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Eager Beaver deck replacement

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by rickw, Aug 17, 2018.

  1. rickw

    rickw Well-Known Member

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    My Trailer deck is in need of replacement. I am missing a few boards and bolts so I plan on buying some deck washers to replace the ones that are missing when I replace the wood. It has hex head bolts that are sucked in flush to the surface now? I was thinking of using galv. carriage bolts. Any thoughts? Anybody use ash on there deck instead of white oak? Plenty of ash around to be had.
     
  2. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    Ash is fine if it sleeps under a roof. It won't last like white oak if used outside, probably split up worse too.
     
  3. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    I would suggest bathing the new wood in linseed oil before the first thing is hauled. Coat it well and let it sit out in the sun for a day or so.

    Ditto on white oak, red oak is acceptable.
     
  4. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    I always use apitong it will last forever

    The Torks bolts that flush mount are usually self tapping witch make them fast caribe bolts require more effort I don't know if one will last longer than the other
     
  5. Wes J

    Wes J Senior Member

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    I've always used Oak and purpose made self tapping deck screws. You have to pre-drill them, but they are self tapping. The only thing I don't like about them is that they don't always "cinch" up. Meaning you can lean on them until the torx bit breaks off and they won't suck the wood down to the cross members. In that case, I back them out and use a C clamp to pull them tight to the cross member before reinstalling.

    It doesn't have to be too pretty for an equipment trailer. They get torn up pretty quickly anyway.
     
  6. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    Ash wouldn't be preferred but it depends on local selection ask your sawmill guy what he thinks I like carriage bolts will never use those brittle torx screws again in a few years they have snapped and the boards are loose also with carriage bolts you can pull them in after the wood drys
     
  7. rickw

    rickw Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for all the replies! I researched a little and determined Dad was right. Ash is not as decay resistant as oak. I think I will use carriage bolts. I am going to strip the deck then my brother is going to blast and paint the trailer
     
  8. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    We went with 1 1/2 inch treated lumber last round …

    Cost was $ 275.00 for the 20 foot deck . 100_3225[1].jpg
    100_3224[1].jpg
    Throw down some conveyor belt on the heavy track equipment .
     
  9. rickw

    rickw Well-Known Member

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    All we haul is a Case Backhoe. Looks a little nerve racking load and unloading the excavator!! Not much room for error!!
     
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  10. AzIron

    AzIron Senior Member

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    Td trailer is awesome that excavator wont hurt it nothing to be scared of unless you can't level the deck side to side or its wet
     
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  11. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Not a lot of room …. It's about like getting a free pass on the carnival rides .:)
     
  12. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Trailer is a 1951 model . Gooseneck has been modified to fit the Kenworth truck and added some tailboard pins to keep the excavator from doing the " Funky Chicken " when loading . :D

    Throw down some wood under the tires to level the trailer .

    100_3608[1].JPG
     
    GregsHD likes this.
  13. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Pressure treated is terribly corrosive. Ash weighs less, but rots fast. Red Oak has hollow tubes in it, water soaks deeply into it whenever it rains. It rots fast. White oak if you can get it is the best choice. Black walnut, or black Locust last ten years longer than stone.
     
    Graham1 likes this.
  14. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    We first went with Hickory wood on the deck . It worked pretty good & was tough & had some spring to it .

    It lasted about 10 years out in the weather and would go back with it but it takes a lot of time rapping with the feller at the saw mill …… The time it would take to get a trailer floor cut I could carve out another bow .

    Was quick & simple to go with the treated wood for the low boy & save the hickory for building bows . :)

     
    RZucker likes this.
  15. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    I redecked an old Hyster lowboy a few years ago, used 3"x.." Fir for decking, no screws, I formed 2"x 1/4" flat bar straps to weld over the deck boards. Deck is still there and the hold downs are too.
     
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  16. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I redecked one of my goosenecks a while back and I just used regular 2x instead of treated. When the trailer guys wanted to sell me specially coated screws, otherwise the treating in the wood eats the screws, I decided if it eats the screws its probably going to eat my steel under the boards.

    I coated it with used oil, and parked it out in the sun to dry it a little. A little dirt on the deck makes it less slippery, and it looks pretty good now.
     
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  17. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    Yep, I redeck a few hay trailers every year with 1-1/8" tongue and groove plywood, we soak the bottom side with used oil, seems to work well, the topside we soak with Thompsens water seal. The hay buyers would freak out if the deck was black.
     
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  18. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    White Oak is the best value choice, unless you can get black locust sawn locally. Hickory is in the same range as Ash for rot resistance, not much. If it stays inside, that opens up lots of possibilities for good hardwoods, even cottonwood in a thicker plank.
     
  19. Wes J

    Wes J Senior Member

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    Never understood how folks use Cottonwood. Cut a Cottonwood down here and it'll be soft as a pillow in 6 months.
     
  20. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    So far I haven't noticed any trouble with the treated lumber rusting the frame its mounted to .

    We used treated tongue & groove lumber when we built the bed for the Chevy C-60 .

    Steel subframe was house trailer beams & crossmembers .

    That was 17 years ago . She aint fell apart yet :)

    100_3373[1].jpg