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Dead horse / undertaker

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by markshr151, Dec 27, 2011.

  1. markshr151

    markshr151 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    central fl.
    I buried a horse the day after Christmas. I started to do some math in my head. Over 10,000 horses in Bervard Co., average life span for a horse is around 20 -25 years, though they can live for up to 30 years.$250 to $600 per horse. Even a low estament would be living.
    Do any of you bury many horses on a regular bases?







    e
     
  2. JBGASH

    JBGASH Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2011
    Messages:
    752
    Occupation:
    Plumbing & Excavation Contractor / farmer
    Location:
    Missouri
    We bury 6- 8 per year, usually from customers that we have done work for in the past. it is somewhat a PITA for us but we have not charged anyone for doing one yet, as long as they have had us do work for them.
     
  3. DirtIsMyName

    DirtIsMyName Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2010
    Messages:
    90
    Location:
    Mobile, AL
    There is a trend toward composting carcasses instead of burying them, groundwater issues. You could charge for disposing of the carcass and sell the compost.
     
  4. JS580SL

    JS580SL Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2007
    Messages:
    558
    Occupation:
    operator
    Location:
    Massachuessetts
    Back in the day my dad use to park his equipment at a friends farm, I know he has quite a few under his belt. I have a few under mine as well. Not as common any more though. The most memorable was the donkey that decided to jump in the hole while no one was looking and wait for the vet to show up. I came around the corner and noticed she was gone, well, look down in the hole and there she is standing waiting. Was like she new exactly what was happening.

    On a different occasion had to bury 2 horses for a friend's friend using his 426 cat with backwards controls. Told me no one will be around to watch you and the holes will be dug, just have to bury them. Well his friend thought it was a fact of life and the kids need to know whats going on. I felt terrible while Im trying to be gentle but backwards controls was helping very much.
     
  5. Kurly

    Kurly Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 17, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    WI
    I live in "horse country" Caledonia Wisconsin and bury about 8- 10 horses a year. I charge about $200 - $300. I can drive to the farms and usually don't even trailer my 580 C with 1500 original hours. I wish I could find more regular work, but I am known in the area for burying horses. I buried my neighbor's dog the day before Christmas, he insisted I take $40. My buddy charges $900 -$1000 for cemetery burials. If you have to drag the horse, pull them by the rear legs. If you pull them by the front legs their head drags backwards and the owners get freaked out. Good luck!
     
  6. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,961
    Occupation:
    Movin dirt
    Location:
    Port Allegany, pa
    Was at the local butcher shop discussing this very issue with the ower who is a friend. He was going to burry a pile of deer carcasses a couple of years back but the feds stepped in, dep or some other alphabet soup, said he had to call a rendering truck or incenerate them. So he built a huge outdoor wood stove. He says that all it takes is a little cardboard the leftovers take care of the rest. Pet cremation might be a better gig...
     
  7. carlsharp

    carlsharp Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    Messages:
    91
    Location:
    Chino Hills, CA
    Here in So Cal we usually call the render truck, usually shows up within a couple hours. I think it's about $300. We bury a few of the 'important' ones...
     
  8. markshr151

    markshr151 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    central fl.
    I am thinking dealing with people and collecting money would be tuff.
     
  9. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Movin dirt
    Location:
    Port Allegany, pa
    Just like with demos, money up front... As far as dealing with people, your in a service industry, need I say more?
     
  10. blademan150

    blademan150 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Messages:
    81
    Occupation:
    Retired Local 150 Operating Engineer
    Location:
    No. Il
    I've buried probably over 100 through the years (35 at once after a barn fire) but around here, like others have said the EPA now has rules and we have to call a rendering service for "field horses" special ones are usually buried, even if its against the law.
     
  11. trevor b

    trevor b Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2011
    Messages:
    206
    Location:
    eastern ontario
    iv'e done a few not a big part of my type of work tb
     
  12. markshr151

    markshr151 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    central fl.
    This is why I brought it up , I now have a better picture of how it would look and problems one might run in to.
     
  13. stumpjumper83

    stumpjumper83 Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Movin dirt
    Location:
    Port Allegany, pa
    whatever you do, always make sure that the hole is 2x as big as you think you need. you want the dead beast to fit with easy even if rigor mortis has it all splayed out...
     
  14. Mr. Butcher.

    Mr. Butcher. Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    Wales, GB.
    About 4/5 years ago one of our horses got out in the early hours of the morning, turns out somebody had opened the field gates to go shooting after the foxes and rabbites then never shut the gates:mad:. It had some how got its self into next doors garden and consumed half a Laurel hedge, laurel being quiet toxic to horses. By the time the vet had come put the horse down and gone, then myself arriving with a backhoe borrowed from work to remove the horse as the garden is 6ft above the road level, this all coincided with the 9:00am primary school start which just so happens to near enough opposite our neigbours:rolleyes:

    We managed to get the hourse removed and buried with out to much fuss and scaring of the kids:eek:. just make sure that the hole is dug big and deep enough to accomidate the effects of rigour.
     
  15. Wick

    Wick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2011
    Messages:
    46
    Occupation:
    Heavy vehicle mechanic/engineer
    Location:
    Orbost Victoria Australia
    Ha ha !! this one brings back memories, when I was around 13 my old man sent me to bury a cow the neighbors had dragged to their burial plot (unbeknown to me at the time) so I preceded to dig the hole in a small depression I thought would be the best spot as once the hole was backfilled the depression would fill to the same level as the surrounding dirt, guess what I found down a few feet !! yep - a previous burial - not a pleasant experience - had a hell of a stinkin' mess before I'd finished, got bogged in the process too - what a way to learn.
     
  16. markshr151

    markshr151 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 29, 2010
    Messages:
    176
    Location:
    central fl.
    Sounds like some of the story's they were only buried a few (about 3') feet down. I did mine 7' and room to put a small piano on the bottom.
     
  17. rjsmithffb

    rjsmithffb Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2012
    Messages:
    14
    Location:
    Danville IN
    My dear wife has a few horse critters I would like to bury - guess I should let the kick off first. That $8 / square bale habit of theirs is hard for a cheap guy like me to deal with...