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Dangers of welding wheels.

Discussion in 'Safety Issues' started by Lee-online, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. Randy88

    Randy88 Senior Member

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    Not sure if I caused the stir or not I reread my post and didn't want anyone to take it the wrong way, first I was asking if its better to toss water or snow on a rim or hub to see if it sizzles or makes noise before checking for a hot wheel bearing or pounding on a tire checking for flats instead of just walking up to the hub and putting your hand on it to see if its normal, warmer than normal or hot to the touch and there's a problem, second at what temp does a hub get to start the reaction in the first place, a wheel bearing going out or a dragging brake will set it off but at what temp, if the hub or brake drum is at normal operating temp that shouldn't do it, but how much hotter does it need to be, water sizzle on the hub?, slightly before? need smoking brakes? or the sound of sizzling grease?

    Most everyone has worked around hot brakes at one time or another, you pull some steep hills and you finally get to where your going and need to unload, the first thing I usually do is to see if any brake got hot or you've got flat tires or low tires, most of my trailers are lowboys and the tires are fully exposed so you do the walk around and check as you take chains and binders off and get unloaded. The initial question I had was is it better to toss some snow on or water on from a distance first before ever getting near the tire and hub when you don't hear any sizzling grease or smell anything hot or just do the normal walk around and touch the hubs and pound on the tires to check for flats? Do you need to hear or smell something for the reaction to start or at that point is it already too late? I thought the temp gun was a great suggestion now at what temp is it safe to walk up to them and do the normal walk around and work around them?
     
  2. rare ss

    rare ss Senior Member

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    there was in incident over here with a L1850 LeTourneau popped a tyre in the workshop with 3 boilermarkers welding the on the boom.. was a weriod failure was like it was a weakness in the sidewall and blew a 2" x 2" hole
    apart from their hearing the guys where ok
     
  3. markshr151

    markshr151 Well-Known Member

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    What about seating beads with starting fluid? Dose this not make it hot enough?
     
  4. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    Are these videos hosted elsewhere? if so maybe you can post a link for us.............................
     
  5. LuNaTIcFrEAk

    LuNaTIcFrEAk Member

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    No, I got them on a flash drive from a training course I took down at the Michelin training center. I will upload them to rapidshare sometime this week.
     
  6. Dinale Precast

    Dinale Precast Active Member

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    I would be very interested in seeing these videos.
     
  7. tireman

    tireman Senior Member

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    No,there is no sustained fire to generate the heat-although it is strongly recommended against doing this.There are many,many other ways to get a tire to take air(blast of air,pack the beads with soap,etc.).All it it takes is a little too much starting fluid,and you've got an explosion.
     
  8. oldtanker

    oldtanker Senior Member

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    Interestingly enough a non mechanical friend moved into a new home a couple of weeks ago. He calls me up and tells me he has a trailer tire with a broken bead and wants to know about using starting fluid to seat it. So I drove over to see what he had going on thinking it was on his single axle trailer. Well it kinda was.....single axle lawn cart! I tipped it on it's side......removed the cotter pin and slid the wheel off and we drove into the local repair shop who seated the tire for him at no charge! His very lame excuse was "I didn't know how easy it was to take that off"......cause he didn't look! It isn't the tires that are dangerous......it's the people working around them!

    Rick
     
  9. tireman

    tireman Senior Member

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    Oh yes they are dangerous.ANYTHING pressurized is dangerous.But you are correct that it's the human factor that determines the final outcome indeed.Ignorance is a useless excuse after the fact-providing that there is a survivor.
     
  10. OFF

    OFF Senior Member

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    We had a local tire shop death on the weekend - welding on a wheel. Bump for all those who haven't watched the video in the first post yet.
     
  11. 544D10

    544D10 Well-Known Member

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    Why not just dismount the tire?
     
  12. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Well, that would be the proper way, but some peple are always in too big of a hurry to spend the extra time it takes to do it right. Unfortunately, some like the above tire man will never get the chance to do it over the right way.
     
  13. Nick L

    Nick L New Member

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    I think the cause of the explosion has nothing to do with the tire at all. I am pretty sure that it it caused by the transfer of heat from the rim to the air that inside of a preassurre vessile. In this case the tire that is on the rim is the weakest link in the preasure vessile and that is what fails first.
     
  14. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    If you listen to the soundtrack on the video the Bridgestone guy explains it. The root cause is a chemical reaction called pyrolisis caused initially by the transfer of heat from welding the rim to the tyre in the first instance. However even if you take away the source of heat the reaction continues and it's the heat generated by that reaction that causes the pressure to rocket up and finally the tyre to explode. So the process is more complicated than you think.

    The problem is that even removing the valve stem is not guaranteed to allow the air to exit fast enough, because the rapid rise in pressure cannot be relieved just through the small diameter of a valve stem, so the tyre may still explode.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2012
  15. scott_s

    scott_s Member

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    Thanks for sharing! I passed it along to a few of my coworkers.
     
  16. alexllever

    alexllever Member

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    yes it's true, rubber burning can kill u in very short time.
    thx for the life saving share.
     
  17. daterplant

    daterplant Well-Known Member

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    www.cnplus.co.uk/...dyggor-gaylord...tyre-explosion/1677866.articl...
    This is the result of heat transfer to a DEFLETED tyre.

    Until I read this thread I thought a deflated tyre was safe, which got me thinking of an accident some years ago at Dyggor gaylord in the UK
    I use to work for that company and thought the tyre which exploded was inflated.
    However, after looking at the report I now know it was deflated.
    Thanks for starting this thread it has made me look at the safety of working around tyres in a whole different way.
     
  18. DirtHauler

    DirtHauler Senior Member

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    http://webcache.googleusercontent.c...pot/1691691.article+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us correct link



    Here is an other video that shows what happened less than 2 mins after a weld was made on a wheel.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kZuBj_KW84E
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2012
  19. stock

    stock Senior Member

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    06Apr90 UK: SAFETY EXPERTS SEEK SOLUTION TO EXPLOSION AT DYGGOR GAYLORD DEPOT.
    5 April, 1990 | By CNPLUS

    Safety experts are blowing up tyres to try to find out how three fitters died during an explosion at a plant hire firm in Nottingham last week. Health and Safety Executive scientists are carrying out controlled explosions on 2.5 m tyres similar to the one that blew up and killed three men at Dyggor Gaylord's depot.An inquest into the deaths was adjourned last week pending results of the scientists work.An HSE spokesman said: 'The research and laboratory divisions have been called in. They have collected debris and are doing forensic tests and setting up controlled explosions.'We are doing what we can to ascertain exactly what happened. The job is made difficult because all the immediate witnesses are dead.'Three men were working on the brakes of a Caterpillar 631 scraper with oxyacetelene welding equipment when the huge tyre blew up in their faces.Fitter Gordon Bradley, 39 and welder Colin Keightley, 30 died instantly from multiple injuries.Fitter Patrick Richardson, 22, died later in Nottingham's Queen's Medical Centre.A one-tonne brake drum was blown 10m by the force of the explosion.John Clarke, who saw the explosion, told the Nottingham Evening Post: 'There was a very loud bang - I turned and saw a cloud of thick black smoke.'It's a terrible shock, everyone is very subdued. It hasn't sunk in yet.'The resumed inquests will be heard before a jury because the men died on industrial premises.Guidance on working with high pressure pneumatic tyres is expected from the HSE once the results of the inquest are known.Dyggor Gaylord is a subsidiary of CP Holdings.
     
  20. CAT303 SR

    CAT303 SR Member

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    Work safe - think about what your doing - take the extra few minutes the down side of death; injury & equipment damage is a far more expensive in the long run

    Spread the word - Well done