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Cros-contamination using fuel buckets for hydraulic fluid

Discussion in 'Lubrication' started by Labparamour, Mar 11, 2017.

  1. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

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    Happy Friday,

    I'm needing to drain the hydraulic fluid on my Deere 450B to repair main suction line from tank to pump.
    Do you see any problems using empty diesel buckets to hold hydraulic oil while doing repairs then putting buckets back into diesel storage when done?
    (Any harm from small amounts of residual products cross-contaminating.)

    Thanks,
    DB
     
  2. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    I don't see a problem with that, there won't be much diesel left in the empty fuel can to affect the hydraulic oil you drain out of the machine. But likewise, I wouldn't think a Deere 450B would hold a whole lot of oil in the hydraulic reservoir, maybe you should consider dumping it and pouring fresh oil back in it when repairs are done? Only you could answer that question. But if you choose to recover and re-use, the little bit of hyd oil left in the fuel cans wouldn't hurt the injection system on a machine of that vintage either.
     
  3. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

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    Thanks for the reply.
    I put fresh fluids in when I got this previously abused machine several years ago.
    I recently noticed the steel suction line has one spot that is crushed in 1/2 the diameter...no belly pan on the machine (it's on my list of things to do).
    Reservoir is 7 gallons but, as I'm breaking the line at the lowest spot, I'm sure there will be more!

    Have a great weekend!
    DB
     
  4. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Well of course, that's the way things typically work, which is where one typically uses ones favorite swear words at full voice while getting doused in hydraulic oil. LoL
     
  5. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Don't you think it might actually be a good time to replace the hydraulic oil based on that statement ..? Just my 2c.
     
    GregsHD likes this.
  6. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

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    Nige, thanks, I appreciate your input.

    The machine is now a weekend, small-acreage use machine.
    While she went unloved by her previous owner, I'm plugging away at issues I find.
    I did replace all fluids when it came home in 2013 and it sees about 100hrs a year around here.
    To the eye, hydraulic fluid still looks nice.
    I'll look at the screen when I get everything drained.
    I agree, in grand scheme, oil is pretty cheap...

    DB
     
  7. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    Have heard of technique ... Put a shop vac on the tank breather to hold the oil back while you break the tube connection. I do see a issue with sucking dirt into the system if the fittings aren't cleaned.

    This is how wood moldings are continuously primed as they are made. A vacuum box full of paint with an entrance & exit hole
     
  8. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

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    The idea of using a shopvac is interesting....might be an option when I change out the coolant temp sending unit.
    For my hydraulic line, probably not. This isn't gonna be a quick fix. I can just imagine my dog tripping on the vac cord while I'm under the open fitting!

    My damaged suction line is no longer available from Deere so I'm debating trying to fab a new one or cut the current one next to the damage, heat and pound out then reweld.

    DB
     
  9. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    One doesn't have to have the vac on continuously. Just long enough to get a plug or cap on the tank side. I would still have a 10 gallon pan (or pans) ready at hand if the vac doesn't work as planned. :eek:
     
  10. lantraxco

    lantraxco Senior Member

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    Typical field repair on a suction tube would be to cut out the damaged section, replace with a length of rubber hose and two or four clamps.
     
    DB2 likes this.
  11. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

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    I like that idea!
    I need to get some hose anyway as each end terminates in hose w clamps....I'll just get a little extra ;)

    DB
     
  12. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

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    Update:
    Doing some repairs during the winter months.
    The suction hard-line had the crushed spot right in the middle of the run.
    I spliced a new section in.
    (Going to pressure test for leaks then paint)
    Replacing the rubber hoses, too.

    I made a “suck bucket” (thanks Willie59) and drained most of the reservoir from the top so there was minimal to catch/wear when I broke the line below.

    Thanks again for everyone’s help.
    Darryl
     

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