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Could REALLY use some input on a Cat D6-9U dozer...........PLEASE and THANK YOU!!!

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by JDDozerman, Oct 14, 2011.

  1. Animal

    Animal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Hi JDDozerman, A couple fo things I maybe able to help with, first, no the 9U will not be able to push as much as a 14C or even TD15 as they only had as much push as an early D5. The D5 acted as a filler between the D4 and D6 when they upgraded the 9U to the D6b. Secondly, some ag tractors had turbos fitted and seemed to run O.K. but they were only doing draft work. The CAT motor in them was a very nice engine and I'm sure it was one of the reasons why CAT has the reputation it has. I had the privilege to operate one in the early '80 with only 2500 hours on the clock from new in 1957 but compared to modern machinery, you can't! Down here they are becoming a collectors machine so pay a premium for them. I would stick with a power shift machine for ease of operation. I'll leave it with you, Nelson.
     
  2. Rusted

    Rusted Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2007
    Messages:
    206
    Location:
    Australia
    Have to disagree there Animal, I think you'll find that the D6B replaced the 9U series in 1960 and both were only available as direct drive....and the D5 replaced the D6B in 1967 with the option of direct drive or powershift otherwise they were pretty much the same machine.
     
  3. OldandWorn

    OldandWorn Senior Member

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2009
    Messages:
    908
    Location:
    Md/Pa
    A little off topic, but I'm wondering why there are so many negative comments about pony motors? To me, they seem like the perfect way to start a big cold diesel. Is the pony motor itself hard to start? Some day I would like to own a dozer with a pony motor just because the concept is so cool but I certainly don't want another headache.
     
  4. JDDozerman

    JDDozerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    105
    Occupation:
    Disabled Farmer
    Location:
    Jacksonville,Missouri
    Thanks for your input Animal (Nelson), I must admit I'm having some pretty hefty reservations, at least with this particular 9U, NOT because it isn't a great dozer, but due to the fact the owner doesn't seem to even know his own machine, which makes me wonder what kind of condition it's "really" in. He has "no idea" how many hours are on it, or what all has been done to it. From what I've read here, he doesn't even seem to know how to operate it properly, since he says flat out it's a "pedal steer"! I have NO idea how the "hydraulic conversion" was done, or IF it was done properly, plus he said "it had sat for 30 YEARS, only being started once in a while"! On top of that, I'm not sure of the correct "terminology", and please correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't believe this dozer has the "pump up" or "automatic" track adjusters?!?!? Don't these older 9U's have like a "manual threaded type" track adjuster of some sort, that is kind of a pain in the arse?? I guess what I'm getting at is, I don't want to get the dozer and then find out that it's going to need a lot of work, plus, I just read an older post that talked about a rather worrisome, and "famous" problem these older D6's had with busting, or breaking, the intermediate shafts, as well as problems with the steering clutches locking up, etc.. I DO realize ANY "used" dozer could have potential problems, however, I am looking at some other tractors that I at least know a LOT more "history" about, such as what's been done to them, how many hours they have, etc., that would probably be much easier for me to operate, as well as having more things going for them, such as having a tilt blade (but not a 6 way), more weight and horsepower, NO pony motor to cuss at, etc.. I don't know, I'm just seeing a LOT of "red flags" with this specific D6-9U! It may wind up being a "moot" point anyway, as he doesn't seem to be in any hurry to get me the rest of the info, pics, and video, he said he would. Onward and upward, the saga continues, if nothing else I'm sure learning a LOT from you all, and I really appreciate it! I just REALLY need to get SOMETHING SOON, because each day is just putting me farther and farther behind schedule! It doesn't help that I'm disabled, because I wouldn't have to be so darn "picky", but that's the way it is, I just gotta live with it! I wish everyone a great day, and thank you all!

    JD
     
  5. Komatsu 150

    Komatsu 150 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Messages:
    673
    Location:
    Northern Illinois
    Hoo Boy. Pony motors would start machines in the winter when electric starting systems of the day couldn't. Other than that nothing good. They worked perfectly fine when in good shape and well maintained. A pony motor had a terrible life - Start from dead cold go to full throttle, load the daylights out of it and then shut down. Lots of parts, gasoline to go bad, carburetor to varnish up, weak ignition - you get the idea. They seemed to have a short life and were amazingly expensive to repair. I remember a friend pricing a short block from Cat and the price was $2200.00 and this was in the seventies.
     
  6. ILLICEMAN

    ILLICEMAN Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2007
    Messages:
    168
    Occupation:
    FARMER ex CHEVY DEALER
    Location:
    lake ozark,mo.
    Simple

    Get a D5b or a D6c or a D6d.
     
  7. 51kw

    51kw Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2007
    Messages:
    239
    Location:
    Minnesota
    JDDozerman I am from Owatonna. Doesnt sound to me like the person selling it knows this machine at all.
     
  8. JDDozerman

    JDDozerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    105
    Occupation:
    Disabled Farmer
    Location:
    Jacksonville,Missouri
    That's pretty wild, I grew up on a farm southeast of Cannon Falls, and I definitely know Owatonna very well also, at least I use to. I would have to agree with you at this point, still no follow up from the guy so I guess I just keep looking. I feel like a woman trying to pick out the right hat!!! :^( I haven't had much luck finding any decent D6's or D7's at all, most have been cable dozers, which I definitely don't want. I have an option on a couple other brands, but I'm going to do some more searching in the meantime, I just wish I had more money, and time! Same old song and dance! Hope everyone has a great evening!

    JD
     
  9. dieseldave

    dieseldave Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2007
    Messages:
    337
    Location:
    egg harbor NJ
    I have a later model oil clutch D6 9U, and it's one of the toughest machines Cat ever built. Here's an old thread on it https://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/showthread.php?5174-old-pony-start-D6&highlight= , and if you go to my youtube channel there are some vids of it there pushing trees. I put a turbo on mine, and it helped but it was really just fine without it. The dry clutch machines aren't too bad- they worked many thousands of hours back in the day- but the oil clutch is a better setup. The dry clutch machines used rubber links between the flywheel and the clutch to transmit the power, and the last time I bought a set for my D7 about ten years ago they were getting harder to find and a bit pricey. Nothing wrong with a pony motor if it's in good shape, but I'm betting the one on the machine in question has seen better days. Still, it may be more economical to fix it rather than converting to direct electric, especially if the flywheel housing isn't already machined to take a starter- some were, some weren't.
     
  10. Animal

    Animal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2011
    Messages:
    58
    Location:
    New Zealand
    Thanks for that Rusted, I stand to be corrected as it was a few years ago that I was told that and as normal I probably wasn't listening correctly.
     
  11. chevota84

    chevota84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Prineville OR
    If its not pushing or climbing you'd have to use the brake pedals to slow/stop a track to turn, that's probably why he keeps saying "pedal steer". Have you ever ran a direct drive machine?

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
     
  12. JDDozerman

    JDDozerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    105
    Occupation:
    Disabled Farmer
    Location:
    Jacksonville,Missouri
    Hello chevota84, thanks for that input, I have operated direct drive machines before, the "problem" here was the guy had done some "modifying" to the tractor, and in addition, I was just going off what he told me. As it turns out, he was just waisting my time anyway, as he never sent me the additional info, pics, and video, he had promised, and after waiting for a couple weeks, he finally emailed me and just said "it probably wouldn't be a good dozer for me", so who knows, I kind of figure it probably was not as nice as he claimed, or something was wrong with it, but who knows, it all a "moot point" now. I'm have other machines I'm looking at so life goes on. I did learn a lot about these old D6-9U's, so it was not a "total waste" at least, I just wish the guy would have shot me straight from the beginning, but I'm not going to dwell on it. Thanks again, and thanks EVERYONE for all the great input, assistance, and information, I REALLY do appreciate it!
    Best wishes to all,
    JD
     
  13. chevota84

    chevota84 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2011
    Messages:
    189
    Location:
    Prineville OR
    I wasnt trying to be a Richard but I saw your username and thought that if you were used to newer jd dozers you weren't going to like an old direct drive cat much lol. Good luck on your search.

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
     
  14. JDDozerman

    JDDozerman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2011
    Messages:
    105
    Occupation:
    Disabled Farmer
    Location:
    Jacksonville,Missouri
    Hey no problem, I didn't take it in a "negative" way, so no worries. I have operated a few different machines, mostly back before I became disabled, so it has been several years. If anything I would probably have to get use to the "newer" hystats, or maybe some of the powershifts, if they have changed drastically, but I'm a pretty quick learner so it shouldn't be too awful tough. My main problem is that, because of my legs getting crushed, I have limited use, and strength, in them, so I just can't get something that has "heavy duty" pedals, if you get my drift. That's why I was aiming at a "lever steer" tractor, or something that required the least amount of "foot work". Anyway, all is well, I have narrowed down my search considerably, and will most likely be making my final decision this week, at least IF everything goes as planned!!! Thank you for your support, and kindness, have a good one!
    Jeff
    (JDDozerman)
     
  15. tractorg25

    tractorg25 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Occupation:
    Heavy Equipment Technical Support
    Location:
    Union, SC, USA
    Ok Cat D6 9U. I have a late 47 or early 1948 serial number 9U00428. It has the heavy hard nose as some call it. Its the hydraulic cylinder mount and has the 46 hydraulic control. As other have stated its direct drive, hand clutch for main, lever to release steer clutch and pedal to engage brake. The pony motor with clean fuel and proper tune will start every time and if the pony motor starts the big engine will start as long as it has fuel. As for the cable control it is NOT A WINCH!!. If it where used to try and free a stuck tractor it may very well rip out of the mounts. Very thin metal comapred to a Hyster winch. This machine will do most any job I have from root raking, KG blade, land clearing, pond building, Fire lines, tree planting, pulling plows , its a real work horse. However as someone already mentioned its not a D8.
     
  16. Jaylo

    Jaylo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    Hey JD,

    Did you ever get a dozer? We have a D6-9U hydrolic hard-nose that we rescued about a year and a half ago. Since that time we have had the hydrolic cylinders rebuilt, removed and reset the head, replaced the injectors and replaced the trunions. We also greased all fittings, replacing those needing replacement. All filters (fuel, oil, hydrolic) have also been replaced. It was converted to the electric start before we got it. We just pushed our first tree down today and it operated stronger than our previous dozer, a D6B. You can see it at this link on youtube: http://youtu.be/t1oQ4O0bO9A You can reach me at slnlr@yahoo.com or (931) 797-2989.

    Jason
     
  17. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2009
    Messages:
    3,481
    Location:
    Gladstone Queensland Australia
    Yair...Over here you very seldom see a bush tractor without a treepusher but in the U.S. (going by the Youtube clips) they are very seldom used.

    Why would this be? A treepusher is easier on the tractor any way you look at it...and you can tip out bigger trees.

    You don't need horsepower, all a tractor can do is spin its tracks, what you need is leverage...and down pressure to give traction.

    If you go in too low with a cable blade you pull both steering clutches back together as you rock to keep the PCU 'live' and lift the blade.

    Cheers.
     
  18. Jaylo

    Jaylo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2011
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    United States
    Scrub Puller,

    I can't really speak for anyone else, but in our part of the country, except for the occasional fence row, we have very little soil. We have rock so most roots don't get real deep. That tree was an exception. Thanks for the operating lesson. I am a much better mechanic than an operator.

    Jason
     
  19. ksahlstr

    ksahlstr New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2012
    Messages:
    1
    Location:
    Minnisota
    Hi JDDozerman:

    Coincidentally, I purchased a Cat D69U (1955, 66 HP, cable blade, 12" wide tracks) about 6 months ago and have used it (north central MN) to push out some stumps and dig out a pond. I'm pretty happy with the (all original) pony motor and diesel engines as well as the operation. The key to your questions lies in the Serial Number (SN) of your Cat. Also, one of the best things I did was to buy the original Operator's Instructions and Parts Book for this Cat.
    Note that each track is independently driven by a steering clutch and brake - one for each - the type of clutch (wet or dry) depends on the SN. Cats with SN lower than (earlier than) 8U6444 and 9U13263 are DRY clutch, SN higher than this (like mine) are Oil-type. Also, ideally, only the steering clutches should be used to turn, especially when pushing or pulling a load; braking just makes for sharper turns.


    Here is a cut/paste from Wikipedia that answers a lot of your questions. (the link is shown below):

    "The D6 started out in 1935 as the RD6, fitted with a 3-cylinder 45 hp D6600 engine. The numbering was changed to the D6 in 1937.[2] Caterpillar first introduced the entirely new D6 in 1941 with the 4R & 5R series. This was powered by the D4600 engine of 55 hp (drawbar).

    The D6 4R/5R was replaced by the D6 8U & 9U series, fitted with the 6-cylinder D318 engine of 66 hp, in 1947.
    In 1959 the D6 was replaced with the D6B after 60,000 D6 4R/5R and 8U/9U tractors had been built.
    In 1963 the D6C was introduced.
    In 1977 the D6D with a 140 hp engine was introduced, as well as the D6D SA version with 125 hp (drawbar) for agricultural use.
    The D6H was introduced in 1986 along with 3 other H-Series track-type tractors. This was the first D6 with Caterpillar's elevated drive sprocket undercarriage.
    The D6R replaced the D6H in 1996.
    The D6M was a LGP version with 140 hp.
    Since 1996 the D6K at 125 hp and 28,409 lb, the D6N at 150 hp and 36,497 lb and the D6T at 165 hp at 46,690 lb all have been introduced

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caterpillar_D6