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Concrete Paver Production

Discussion in 'Pavers' started by fensoncont., Dec 1, 2007.

  1. fensoncont.

    fensoncont. Senior Member

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    What kind of production can concrete pavers get? I believe a large manufacture is Gomaco, an average size machine of theres. 12" thick concrete base, with laborers working as well. A Bid Tab i saw had 550,000 SY of 12" Portland Cement Paving for a new bypass here in Ohio. The cost was around $35/SY. Just trying to get a general idea for production on those machines because I am not familiar with them.
     
  2. DirtHauler

    DirtHauler Senior Member

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    We just finished paving the runway at Sea-Tac Airport in Seattle. For most of the job we had two placers running and were running the batch plant at full production. We were able to do around 2800 yards in a 12 hour day. This was 17" thick and 37.5' wide pour. We used dump trucks to bring in the concrete from the onsite batch plant. This was with a large crew and we seemed to be the most limited by the production of the batch plant. The paver and one of the placers were both bought new and this was there first job. We had to refuel the paver half way through the day, seemed like a larger fuel tank would have made sense.
     
  3. fensoncont.

    fensoncont. Senior Member

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    Thanks for the reply. I'll use some direct variation to see if I can get some averages done.
     
  4. DirtHauler

    DirtHauler Senior Member

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    I should make clear that this was at a ideal jobsite. There were no public roads between batch plant and paver, lots of open space, all the cages were pinned into the subgrade, 100% compaction subgrade, duel string lines all set, and LOTS of people to make sure everything went as smooth as possible.
     
  5. surfer-joe

    surfer-joe Senior Member

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    In 1970 I was a tandem dump driver, part of the Eisenhour team that slip-formed the first "mile in a day" in Michigan on I-696 near Charlotte. The spreading and finishing machinery was all CMI. The batch plant was a Johnson, 9 yards to a batch. The dumps were all 9yd Diamond Reo's. We drove directly onto the ROW from the plant. I hauled 110 loads myself that day, the other 19 trucks all did about the same. It was about a 6AM to 10PM shift. The slip-former straddled two lanes. Plant power was a Cat D398, that failed and shut down for one hour near the middle of the day. The plant loader was a Cat 980. There were any number of subs hauling aggregate and cement into the plant during the day. The plant went down numerous times for minor problems, mostly electrical.

    Everyone was whipped, but we did nearly as well the next day, hauling further from the plant.
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2007
  6. fensoncont.

    fensoncont. Senior Member

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    Thanks for the help. I would have to say your making production there surfer joe! I'm sure it was a nice experience, although the long day.
     
  7. fensoncont.

    fensoncont. Senior Member

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    Hey DirtHauler,

    What are some model numbers on the 'concrete placers' ? Those are what the dump trucks dump into and those are equipped with a conveyor that will convey it in front of the paver correct?

    What does it take to mobilize one of those concrete pavers?
     
  8. connie shee

    connie shee New Member

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    Sales
    Location:
    China
    We have some models for paver block forming machine for your reference, which can produce color paver bricks and grass planting bricks etc.
     
  9. xcavator120

    xcavator120 Well-Known Member

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    Equipment Operator
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    Kansas
    We've been working on a runway/taxiway widening-extension project. We just finished with the first phase of the project. I know squat about paving and concrete as I work dirt. We were using a Gomaco 2600 which was just purchased by our company. The only problem we've had was the bars in the baskets having broken welds. The concrete was pushing them out. So the basket company had to come out and re-weld them.
     
  10. oakland

    oakland COPPA

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    about 2 1/2 months ago they were doing concrete paving here. the plant loader was a 972H cat. they had a placer/spreader then a paver and finally a finisher. they averaged 1 to 1 1/2 miles every 2 days. mostly because of the weather being very wet. portland cement was used for the entire stretch of the progress with an onsite (portable) batch plant.
     

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  11. Cat is ALL

    Cat is ALL Well-Known Member

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    Pictures of the plant?
     
  12. oakland

    oakland COPPA

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    Location:
    nampa,idaho
    concrete placing company's portable concrete plant, loader, and trucks.
     

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