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Compact Loader Tire size?

Discussion in 'Compact Wheel Loaders' started by Steve Bowman, Jul 27, 2018.

  1. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Southern Ohio
    It is a Waldon 7000 which specs a 14x17.5 10 ply tire size.
    After picking it up recently, I have been doing some work on it to get it operational and I have not yet operated this loader. So, I don't really have a personal baseline.

    Currently, it sits on solid, smooth 825-15 6.50 tires. They measure about 29" tall. My intended use is around the farm on and off gravel roads. So compared to what I have, a change back to pneumatic is the way to go
    Given the fact that I have solid tires now, I will also have to source the wheels when looking for new tires.

    From what I can find, the 14x17.5 tires are roughly 36" tall and I assume, 14" wide, but I am not sure.

    I have found a set of 4 31x15.5-15 that look pretty good. I have also located a set of the 14x17.5 tires. Based on the pictures of both, the 31x15.5-15's look noticeably wider than the 14x17.5. I definitely like that for increased flotation. I don't plan on much road time, so I think the slightly lower gearing of the 31's won't be an issue.

    Not really related to the tires themselves, but it looks like my bolt pattern and center hole are not standard skid steer dimensions, so I plan on putting new centers in the wheels also. So, any input regarding offset might be helpful. Currently, the solid wheels have about 4" to the inside, and 3" to the outside. I am thinking of trying to maintain that 3" to the outside, and let the rest go to the inside, but I might benefit from a wider stance, so I am not sure.


    I can't think of any pitfalls, but thought I might just throw it out there in case there is something I am not considering.

    Thanks
     
  2. Theweldor

    Theweldor Senior Member

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    Location:
    Western, NY
    If you are changing centers on the rims, just check that you have clearance between the tires and frame. Also never weld on a rim with the tire mounted. Bad things can happen.
     
  3. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the reminder about welding on mounted wheels. Although I will probably do it anyway.:eek:
    I will definitely at least remove the valve cores, maybe even break down one bead. All while keeping my eye on the heat gain in the wheel. But maybe that is not a shortcut I should even consider.


    I say this without laying my eyes on the rims yet. If they need valve stems and or patches, they might come off the wheels anyway. Will know more this weekend, I think.


    What about loading the tires with liquid? Maybe not necessary, but my tractor benefited from it. Mostly thinking of it improving my stability with uneven ground.
     
  4. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

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    The set of 14-17.50 tires I located are foam filled. I would say that for general use, that might be desired, but it is a definite no-no for welding on.

    Another reason I am leaning towards the 31's
     
  5. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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    Not to get off course but welding on a tire wheel assembly is far more dangerous than most think
     
  6. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for that. That is completely surprising. I am not clear as to what would actually start that reaction within the tire they reference. Wish it was clearer. I wonder how close to the bead they where welding? I can' really see how a short weld like that could cause the tire casing to heat up and start a reaction. I would bet that during peak summer temps it would not be unheard of to get tire temps in the 140f range.

    Why would that not start this type of reaction?

    Obviously the video is edited, but I would like to see the gradual rise from 73 to 216 degrees, rather than the edit that takes place. Just hard to believe.

    Personally, I would be much less surprised to see this after using starting fluid to seat a bead. I have seen and done this many times.

    But it is definitely a little more risky than I had considered.
     
  7. Jonas302

    Jonas302 Senior Member

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  8. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    G..G..G..Granville...........!!
    The process by which the combustion starts is generally refered to as pyrolysis, however that's not 100% technically true. It's the same process that can cause pneumatic tyres to explode after a machine/vehicle has suffered a lightning strike.

    Here's a detailed explanation from an expert in the field, a guy I worked with a number of years ago. The pair of us were part of the team that carried out a fatal accident investigation on a large haul truck front tyre that exploded and killed the operator. I would go as far as to say that what he doesn't know about tyres isn't worth knowing. His article is more oriented towards off-road tyres but on-highway tyres can be just as dangerous - the only difference is the amount of force produced by the bang ....

    http://otrglobal.com.au/wp-content/...al-bulletin-Tyre-explosion-misconceptions.pdf
     
  9. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

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    Well, I now have the tires/wheels. Given the work involved preparing the wheels, I have decided that my best option will be to completely dismount the tires.

    Thanks for the advice