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Cleaning out a pond.

Discussion in 'Agricultural Operations' started by Jeff D., Aug 30, 2010.

  1. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Not sure if this is the right forum, or if there is one?

    I have a small pond, approx 1/2 acre.

    It's an old pond(originally dug around '70). It has been cleaned around the edges with an excavator a couple of times since then, but it's been atleast 10years since the last time.

    Anyways, the pond has alot of vegetation and has been shallowing around the edges. I measured it's deepest point at 8.5 ft.

    The pond is stocked with fish. Bluegill, Large Mouth Bass, and Perch.

    I cleaned/deeped about 50ft of shoreline with the backhoe and the water turned very turbid. Was worried about killing the fish, so I stopped.(did clear in about a week)

    Anybody here have any experience cleaning/deepening a pond that already has fish?

    Would prefer not killing the fish, if possible.
     
  2. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    If it's your machine and your pond, just do a little at a time, then let water clear. I am working on one now I've been doing off and on for a good customer for about a year. It's a PITA cause i move in for a day and then out for a while, but it gives me something to do on down days. No floaters yet.
     
  3. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Mitch, how big a pond is it, just guessing?

    I know different species can tolerate different amounts of turbidity. 'Specially Catfish. They can tolerate alot. Bass I think can tolerate alot, too, but don't know about the sunfish & perch?

    It is my pond, and my equipment, so you're right, no big timeline, here.

    A little at a time could work.:)
     
  4. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    You need to wait at least as long as the interval between your posts on HEF... :tong

    (Nice to see you, old buddy.) :)
     
  5. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    But it'll fill back in, naturally, faster than that?!:(

    Maybe I'll shorten up the interval a little, then?;)

    Thanks Digger, and back at ya.:)
     
  6. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    The ponds on the family's farm were cleaned out / expanded with a "free" dragline about 20 years ago (Holy Crap! was it really that long ago!?!) and the fishing was slow until the water cleared and the bottom settled up again. But all the species made it through the process. Bass, catfish and bluegill all still there. :)
    And I'll pile on that it's good to see Jeff D. post's on here again!
     
  7. bill onthehill

    bill onthehill Senior Member

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    I think somebody put out too many grade stakes and he could not help himself. Good to see you back and look forward to your posts.
     
  8. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Thanks Korey & Bill for the kind remarks.:)

    Grade stake?? What's that?! I don't know nuthin' bought no grade stakes?!:wink2

    Korey, I just stocked the pond this spring with fingerlings. The DNR required me to put in a dam with spill pipe/screen so my fish wouldn't make an escape during high water. The pond drained through a little swampy area into a designated trout stream.

    Anyways, I should've done all the cleaning of the edges at that time, and waited to stock the pond when it was done. I kinda put the buggy in front of the horse.

    I also never thought the water would get as muddy as it did when I did do some cleaning with the backhoe, either.

    I think I'll just do small portions at a time, like Mitch mentioned.
     
  9. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    It's a very small pond, less than 1/4 acre, landowner rented a backhoe and dug it. He made a disaster out of the sides, and a big timber Co. is paying me to straighten it up as a deal sweetener on some other deal they are doing with him.
     
  10. Autocar

    Autocar Senior Member

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    I will have to remember that one Mitch, Ill dig you a pond for your timber :) Ive used a few lines in my life but never that one ;)
     
  11. Go2ndAmend

    Go2ndAmend Member

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    I have a bit of experience in this area. What we do on our ponds which are used for irrigation water storage is a combination of chemical and mechanical weed control. The chemical we use is called "Reward". It is a fish-friendly aquatic herbicide which is applied once in the spring and twice during the summer months at the label rate. It works well in controling the week populations. We also use either an excavator or backhoe to remove the cattails and other weeds about every 2-3 years. The key is to not do too much of either and end up depleting the oxygen level in the pond to the point where your fish become floaters. We never clean more than 1/2 of a pond at a time, using either chemical or mechanical means, and have never had any problems. The ponds are all stocked with Bass, Blugill and Perch with a few Catfish thrown in for good measure.
     
  12. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Thanks G2A.

    I haven't used any Reward yet. I have used Cutrine+ and Weedtrine(diquat) for algea and duckweed problems. Neither seemed to do much for the weeds though, atleast how I applied it.

    I have an aerator system with 3 diffusers, so an oxygen drop shouldn't be as bad when I do finally do something.

    Anyways, thanks again.
     
  13. Reuben Scott

    Reuben Scott New Member

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    coatesville indiana
    cut a hole in the damn let it set for a year rent a wide track push it all out that,s the best way fish are cheap
     
  14. chucks1999

    chucks1999 New Member

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    ohio
    wind turbe is your best bet they work good