1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

Cat 951-C in my sights

Discussion in 'Track Loaders' started by Nitelite, Sep 30, 2013.

  1. Metalman 55

    Metalman 55 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2013
    Messages:
    1,050
    Location:
    Ontario
    Thanks for the updates Nitelite! In spite of your injuries, you have been busy with all those projects going on! Nice job on the shop too......looks well built. The 48 Ford is done up nice as well...…….looks great! Did you do the restoration yourself?
     
    DMiller likes this.
  2. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    Metalman, I bought the 48 Ford pretty well the way it is but I have also done quite a bit of work to it. The transmission was supposed to have only 500 miles on it but whoever rebuilt it did a poor job and now I found it necessary to open it up and do a proper rebuild, replacing all that was neglected on the first rebuild. Several more things need to be done or redone to make the truck right. Something else to tinker with.

    Everything that I own is old. I have found that if you can keep old stuff inside and out of the weather, it helps to prolong its useful life. If I park the old machines inside for a month, then when I go back to use them, they are just as I left them. Buildings are cheaper than replacing machinery. If they are kept inside they can be serviced in inclement weather. I imagine that living where you live, you know all about inclement weather.

    More project pictures. The new house, the new spring holding tank.
     

    Attached Files:

    Tinkerer likes this.
  3. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    4,138
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    Have a small slow discharge spring on our place, drops into a small creek and flows year round, have often thought of capturing that water for other uses but for now supplies a drinking pool for cattle/wildlife.
     
  4. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    Good to hear from you Miller, when I moved here and built the house after returning from the Army in 1970 there was no public water available. A well was out of my financial reach but the spring was available for free water. I paid $150 to have the first 1000 gallon concrete tank fabricated and it supplied all of our water needs for more than forty years. That new replacement tank was $1400 but I expect that it will handle the family water needs of both houses for many years to come. The little spring puts out about a gallon every three minutes 24/7. The overflow, combined with several other springs, feeds a fishing lake. I have another spring that puts out an eight inch stream. It is like a fire hydrant and makes for a really cold lake capable of good habitat for Bass and other game fish. I built the dam and impounded the lake in 1973.
     
    DMiller likes this.
  5. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    Having trouble with the 955k. When the loaded bucket is raised and curled it will slowly uncurl while traveling to the dump site unless I continually and constantly feather the curl lever. I am thinking that it is in the curl/uncurl valve. Any ideas would help. We are still using the machine but it is a pain to travel and feather the control lever.
     
  6. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,632
    Location:
    Canada
    Sure it's not the cylinder seals?
     
    DMiller and DB2 like this.
  7. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2010
    Messages:
    4,138
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Hermann, Missouri
    Would seriously suspect curl cylinder seals on this.
     
  8. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    One cylinder has a realy slow drip. Maybe a drip every three minutes. I will eventually reseal it but I can't see it as serious enough to cause the bucket to uncurl in thirty feet. I am also thinking that both cylinders would bee leaking in order to cause the uncurl.

    Up for consideration would be a bad internal leak letting fluid seep past the rod piston seals inside the cylinder bore.
     
  9. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    5,877
    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    One way to test cylinders for internal leaks is to block off the port at one end then put pressure in the opposite end as in the picture below:
    test cylinder.png
    Pressure going in the "rod end" of cylinder should try to force the piston and rod to move to the right in the above picture. If however the piston seals "ARE" leaking past the rod will extend out. How fast will depend on how bad the leak is!

    In a prefect cylinder with no air in the cylinder the rod would not move at all however if there is a slight amount of air in the end opposite the rod the rod will move a small amount to the right.

    With two cylinders working together like on the tilt circuit it would be best to check them both at the same time.

    If the pressure is applied at the opposite end of the cylinder a leaking piston seal will instead cause the ram to retract when pressure is applied to extend the rod.

    I had a good selection of block off plates and disks but don't have part numbers for them here. The best ones were the disks that were the same size as the end of the lines where you could just remove one of the split flanges, slip hose out and slip the disc with oring in it back in place and reinstall the flange half. Not sure if there is a list of these by sizes but that would be handy if someone has one, NIGE? any chance you have one?
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019 at 4:24 PM
    DMiller likes this.
  10. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
    Messages:
    5,877
    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    I did find this list but not 100% sure they are the right sizes for the 951-C cylinders.

    block off plates.png
    Unfortunately they are not listed by OD might have to do some work to see if I can find those spec's.

    Redid the form so it was all in one place:

    block off plates.png
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019 at 5:49 PM
    DMiller likes this.
  11. colson04

    colson04 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2016
    Messages:
    285
    Location:
    Delton, Michigan
    What's the difference between a 951 and a 955? I see they are both front engine track loaders, but are there a lot of differences? Capacity? Horsepower? Ground pressure/track gauge?

    I'm curious as I'm considering looking for a trackloader to do similar work to what you've been doing @Nitelite.

    What are your thoughts between the 2 track loaders?
     
    DMiller likes this.
  12. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    You can google the specifications for both machines. There really is not a lot of difference in the machines. The control levers are the same. The weight and measurements are just slightly different. The 955 K has a turbo that gives it about fifteen more HP. The 951 has no turbo but the difference in HP is not detectable from the operator's seat. The 951 is about ten years newer than the 955 but on machines that are that old age is not a factor to consider but rather how they were treated and maintained. Parts are plentiful and readily
    available for both machines at decent prices from Cat or multiple aftermarket sources. If you can do your own wrenching, one of those older caterpillars that has had a little TLC can be a good investment and relativity easy on the pocketbook. Any machine will need reasonable maintenance and repairs along the way.
     
    colson04 and DMiller like this.
  13. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    Thanks for the info kshansen. As the cylinders are beginning to leak to the outside, I think my best bet would be to spend my time rebuilding them hoping for the quick fix. They are no trouble to rebuild and I have everything that it takes to do it. Then, if that don't cure the problem do the troubleshooting including the pressure checking. If overhauling the cylinders is not the cure, then it must be the control valve or a return hose sucking air. The machine does have a hydraulic leak coming from somewhere underneath that I have not checked out. I am seeing one drop every two minutes. If that leak is the main return hose, it could be sucking air into the system.

    I just need to suck it up, keep on operating and hope that it can last long enough to finish the basement job that it is working on now. There is a deadline to meet before foundation contractor shows up to dig the footers and pour concrete. I'll keep you posted as to what I find.
     
  14. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    Messages:
    1,632
    Location:
    Canada
    951 is non turbo, a couple tons lighter with a smaller bucket but very similar.

    Cylinder drift is cylinder seals 90% of the time but if there is a leak in any of the lines going to those cylinders would also make the cylinders creep. Only one cylinder needs to leak for both to creep since they are connected together. If the rod seals are leaking, it's probably 98% cylinder seals are the problem if nothing else is leaking. The rods seals alone could cause the cylinders to creep because they aren't holding the pressure to keep the bucket up.
     
  15. Nitelite

    Nitelite Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2013
    Messages:
    853
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Ashland City TN.
    Thanks Welder Dave, everything points to rebuilding the tilt cylinders. Good rainy day work, if only the machine was in the dry.