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Case 580E steering cylinder disassembly

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by rockbust, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. rockbust

    rockbust Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    sc
    Hi, I have a bad leak in my steering cylinder on my 580 super e 4x4. I removed the cylinder but can not get the piston rod out.
    1. I removed the first thin retaining ring that went in a groove. (see my attached photo)
    2. I tried to remove that white Teflon under the s nap ring. Broke some small pieces off but it will not come out.
    3. I read somewhere that this part the first snap ring is in should be tapped down to expose a second snap ring. I tried banging this down to the point where it is getting dented hacked up.

    Can anyone please offer any advice how to get it apart. CYLINDER.jpg
     
  2. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

    Joined:
    May 21, 2009
    Messages:
    2,840
    Location:
    IL. USA
    Here ya go Rockbust ! Right out of the service manual. steering.png
     
  3. siganens

    siganens Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2016
    Messages:
    15
    Location:
    france
    Hi Rockbust,
    Funnily enough I did one of my steering cylinders today.
    Take out top snap ring
    Remove teflon packer, I just used a small sharp screwdrivm
    er between cylinder wall and teflon packer and levered it out........it is quite tough
    You will then find a second snap ring below the teflon packer, mine broke taking it out but there was a new one in the kit of parts.
    Having removed second snap ring, everything pulls out of the cylinder

    Good luck.
     
  4. rockbust

    rockbust Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2017
    Messages:
    10
    Location:
    sc
    Thank you all for the info. I just couldnt get that teflon packer out. I was finally able to drive down the Gland with a piece of chrome closet pole that fit perfect. That piece that goes inside the gland is a pain. I squished i in half and put a piece of thin wire around it. then folded it again to squeeze it in. first try the o ring popped out in one spot, second try worked.
     
  5. permaculture bob

    permaculture bob New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    VA
    I just wanted to add to this thread for dummies like me who have never done this before and don't have a service manual or other directions

    The teflon spacer and the top snap ring do not come in the standard case seal kit and must be ordered separately which I was not aware of when I destroyed the old spacer trying to get it out.
    When my seal kit and the directions- reproduced from the case service manual- came, it says to remove the outer snap ring and push the gland 1 inch into the cylinder at which point the spacer and inner snap ring should come out more easily and the spacer does not have to be destroyed (like I did charging ahead like a bull in a china shop)

    That single teflon spacer costs about the same as the entire seal kit so it is worth saving if possible, but on an older machine it would be wise to order both the kit and spacer since things may not always go smoothly .

    I personally, (and the guy who sold me the kit,) think the spacer should be part of the seal kit, and perhaps a top mechanic on a newer machine working under ideal conditions can get it out easily without damage, but I really couldn't push the gland in even after the spacer and snap rings were all removed. In fact, I used the live hydraulics to push the piston and gland out of the cylinder (I had to turn the wheel quite a bit, even back and forth before it would budge.)
     
  6. franklin2

    franklin2 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2016
    Messages:
    120
    Location:
    Virginia
    I just did one of my steering cylinders on my 480C. This actually turned out to be more difficult than the larger cylinders on the hoe and the front end loader. Just like small lawnmower tires, being a small cylinder makes it more difficult.

    The most difficult part was getting that seal in the groove up in there, the one the other poster said he had to "squish" in half. Yep, that is really the only way it will go in, and the first time I did it, the weather was a little cold and I was working outside. After it was all done it still leaked.

    So after debating on just getting a whole new $80 cylinder, I decided to try again and got another seal kit. This time I warmed up a cup of water in the microwave and then put this problem seal down in the hot water. This made it more flexible, and I also brought everything inside to warm it up. Things went better and it's working ok now, but you still have to torture that seal pretty good to get it in. I can't see them doing this all day long at the factory, but I think I discovered how they do it. This groove we are trying to put this seal in is made up on one side by a brass guide bushing. I bet when they assemble these at the factory, they slide the seal in place and then press the bushing in behind it.
     
  7. permaculture bob

    permaculture bob New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
    Messages:
    3
    Location:
    VA
    Where do you get a new cylinder for 80$? maybe you have a different system, my cylinder cost 192! although after I had ordered it I saw another for sale for 145.

    With the piston rod out of the cylinder and the end nut removed, I had the misfortune to have to "tap" on the piston to try and remove it. Someone had used loctite or something similar to keep the nut on, and it didn't want to budge (although the nut came off pretty easy) One thing and another, I guess my frustration level went beyond common sense, and before I knew it the soft aluminum piston was deformed by my "gentle" taps.

    Anyway, I broke down and bought a new cylinder. A new piston would cost 65+, the spacer another 20+, and the aggravation of trying to make it all work, priceless. 192 was a bargain when it came to peace of mind and moving on.

    chalk it up to experience and move on.
     
  8. catskinner 10

    catskinner 10 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
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    Occupation:
    Retired Operator/Master Mechanic 48Yr Member IUOE
    Location:
    Metro-East IL.
    Sometimes you have to use a little heat to get the gland to move.
    They can rust in.
    Always use a little heat on the piston bolt or nut because they
    Always have a little Lock-tight on them from the factory and you should do
    The same on reassembly.
    At least with Case anyway.
    Tom
     
  9. permaculture bob

    permaculture bob New Member

    Joined:
    May 12, 2018
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    Location:
    VA
    I was in the middle of using heat and tapping when I suddenly noticed the damage I was doing. I might have salvaged it, but quite honestly the whole project had just gotten too complicated, and throwing money at it seemed a lot easier. The boom cylinder was easy compared with this.

    I do have a few tricks for the next steering cylinder--so maybe that will be a bit easier.

    I definitely reinforced the idea of taking it slow and reading before starting--then rereading, sleeping on it, and reading again in the morning. (having an actual service manual now helps )