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CASE 1845c Restoration. Follow my progress!

Discussion in 'Skid Steers' started by Larpy, Feb 14, 2019.

  1. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    The prior owner went crazy welding every seam, joint or plate on the lift arm and crappy welds at that. I am going to grind two particular areas to clean it up but most importantly figure out if there is an issue or not. The welds are horrible!
     
  2. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    I'm having a hard time figuring out how one could damage that boom in that area!
    Last I knew the 1989 1845C at the quarry was still going strong and despite the best efforts of the apes, I mean operators! they never broke a boom like that.

    I agree with SimS, you need to do a good repair on that boom. If you are not a welder it would be a excellent idea to have a professional look at the job. At least it's nice and clean and off the machine so that should make them happy.
     
  3. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    I don't think it is damaged. It looks like somebody was practicing on welding and used every seam as a project!
     
  4. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Maybe there is someone here who can advise on anything that you should do to fix this "fix"! I personally would be concerned about the welding causing "stress risers".

    I sure hope who ever did it got a big "Dope Slap"

    Dope slap.gif
     
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  5. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    I mentor a young man that is fatherless and try and teach him various skills. Today it was media blasting! We had fun....as mess but fun. There is something exciting about clean, raw steel! The only part left to media blast is the main body which will actually be the easiest. That will be done by weeks end and the paint both this weekend of all goes well! Re-Assembly will be fun since everything is clean :)
     

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  6. 3X8

    3X8 Well-Known Member

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    The young man looks pretty proud! Good on you Larpy :)
     
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  7. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    Lots of work done today! Having the right tools sure makes things easier.
     

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  8. phil314

    phil314 Well-Known Member

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    Looking great. Can't wait to see it done.
    Just one question - if I drop mine off, will you do it next? ;)
     
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  9. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    I am in the paint booth!
     

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  10. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    Almost there!
     

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  11. Jeepwalker

    Jeepwalker Senior Member

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    Looks great. Something I may do at some point in the future.

    Here's a tip if you're interested that'll take a restoration to the next level. I've done a number of classic cars and this will take your restoration to the next level. Maybe you're already going to do this:

    Look around in your area for a plating company. I would think there's one in Denver which serves manufacturers. What I've done is stop in personally and talk to the owner. Ask them if they could do a couple 'runs' for you. What I did was on my last classic car, was put all the silver cad plated parts in a box (things like hood hinges, latches, striker bolts, all inner window regulator parts, bolts, etc), and the Yellow zinc cad items in another box (things like alternator pulley, gold-cad plated bolts, engine parts, engine steel vacuum lines, etc). Everything was paint-free and degreased.

    They did a 'run' of each. What you want to do is find a place that'll first chemical dip (strip) the parts, then plate them. What I received back were perfectly plated parts which looked like expensive brand NEW with all the original tooling marks. And it was like $40 per box. I also paid another $40 for a 'clear' on them, which makes it last longer.

    You could theoretically re-plate all the hydraulic lines and all original pins, parts and bolts. It's WAY better than painting them with silver paint like some guys do ....and better than buying hardware store bolts (which look like "cheapo hardware store bolts"!).

    Another tip I learned from another plating company I'll share: To make it easy for the plating company to inexpensively do small parts, what you can do is get some copper wire and wind the wire through and around all the nuts, parts and pieces you want plated into a 3' long string. It kind of looks like entrails with the parts on a long wire with a hook on the end. But in effect all they need to do is pull the string of wire (with parts attached) out of the box and hang it onto their plating hook, along with the rest of your parts ...first to strip, then to replate. That takes them 30 seconds of work. It's not worth it for the plating company to handle all the small parts unless they put them in a basket (but then you're paying for a more expensive 'run' too. String them up so they WON'T fall off. The cost to buy all those small parts 'replated' new for a classic car restoration, if they're even available, could be immense. But in one shipment you could get back all the parts like brand new. As an example, with the other parts on my wire string, I had all my scuzzy Wittco radiator hose clamps replated, (haven't been avail for years) stripped and replated, and they looked brand new.

    What you want to avoid is any shop which 'blasts' parts prior to plating (that ruins them). Blasted parts dont plate well and look like crap. If you go to a shop and they won't chemically strip the parts, then try another shop. Also all parts should be de-greased and free of paint before taking in. Don't take in any greasy parts b/c they'll reject them. One of the reason places don't like doing parts for people off the street is they can't trust them to bring in 'clean' parts to plate. Painted parts won't plate. Greasy parts will shorten the life of their chemicals. But parts with rubber (like hold-down brackets) are ok b/c the metal will plate but the rubber won't.

    Just thought I'd throw that out.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2019
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  12. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    Great idea!
     
  13. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    I got a lot done this weekend! The lower controls are reassembled with new bushings, machine washers, etc. I also finished media blasting the rest of the body. Paint booth later this week.
     

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  14. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Larpy likes this.
  15. sims

    sims Well-Known Member

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    Very nice work. I'm waiting for the bucket restoration. Cad or Chrome plating??

    SimS
     
  16. Larpy

    Larpy Well-Known Member

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    Funny you would mention the bucket. I am actually not touching the bucket. It is dented, dirty, and warped ....I like it like that lol. My buddies were laughing that I am a leaving it "original". Hey, it is just a skidsteer :)
     
  17. Jeepwalker

    Jeepwalker Senior Member

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    Use care b/f putting A/A or other so called 'protectants' on your tires. Guys on the classic car forums pretty much uniformly agree the silicates dry up and crack tires. I use WD 40 instead. Doesn't last as long, or shine as bright, but doesn't screw up rubber either.
     
    Last edited: Apr 15, 2019
  18. Jeepwalker

    Jeepwalker Senior Member

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    Work looks great! You're making me want to re-do mine!! :D
    What color is your bucket now? One option might be to spray the top/sides yellow, but leave the rest a light cream (primer) color, or perhaps gray or black. Virnig attachments are a gray color and look pretty good with a skid steer.
     
  19. Dmoneyallstar

    Dmoneyallstar Active Member

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    Looks great! Wish I had another steer or a gantry crane to disassemble my 1845c and give her a make-over like this.
     
  20. crankshaftdan

    crankshaftdan Member

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    This is really a excellent thread-most people like to re-furbish autos/trucks/bikes--construction equip.?? This has to be a first!