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Can you weld in sub zero temps?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by emmett518, Jan 26, 2022.

  1. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    Dumb question.

    I need to weld two D ring assemblies to my snow plow. Can I do this outside in 15 deg F temps?

    Hobart MIG welder.

    Thanks
     
  2. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    Yes you can but preheat the area with a torch first. I would use a small rosebud myself and get to welding before it cools off.
     
  3. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    G..G..G..Granville.........!! Fetch your cloth.
    And if you can put something around your work area to act as a wind-break so much the better. It will stop the heated area cooling off quite so fast.
     
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  4. terex herder

    terex herder Senior Member

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    Especially with what is probably an underpowered MIG unit preheat is required, not just helpful. It will cool quickly, so I'd try for over 100F preheat. If you can't hold your hand on it for more than a couple of seconds its about minimum. Watch your puddle carefully to insure you are getting fusion. If you stop for a couple of minutes recheck temperature and reheat as necessary.

    If the base metal is thicker than about 3/8, you may not have enough welder no matter the amount of preheat. This is based on the Hobarts I've seen, mostly out of farm stores and similar. If you have one of the old Hobarts before they sold out the company, weld on.
     
  5. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    I knew I should have bought a big Miller MIG.
     
  6. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    Think I am going to wait until summer to do the job. Or take it to my local welding shop.
     
  7. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    Kinda/Sorta like my old Hobart:

    upload_2022-1-26_8-2-51.jpeg

    I've welded a lot out in the cold with this one and usually under a tent as my ass gets cold and I really don't like that.
     
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  8. 56wrench

    56wrench Senior Member

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    Is that an old GL-318? It looks like mine only in better shape
     
  9. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    It is a 1957 GB-318 and runs perfect. Likes it's gas a lot too.....
     
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  10. 56wrench

    56wrench Senior Member

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    Mine is a 1953 and that old flat six chrysler sure gulps the gas if i'm doing a lot of air-arc work. Even just welding a tank of gas doesn't last long:rolleyes:
     
  11. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    No difference with this one either. This one is still 6V as it starts so easy I never seen a reason to change it over. If it will crank, it will start. Always give it a few minutes to warm before lighting up too and usually about five minutes to cool down; especially after air-arcing. Only problem I've ever had is the water pump has been rebuilt over the last 41 years. The idle solenoid even works well, still. It's always kept inside however.
     
  12. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    I took the piece to my local welding shop, and they did it in their warm shop with their industrial Miller MIG for $20. More than fair.
     
  13. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    Reminds me of those gas air compressors that the road crews used to use to run their jack hammers.
     
  14. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    My 1962 Worthington rotary vane air compressor. 250cfm at 125psi. Runs and works perfect with oil free air output:

    upload_2022-1-26_18-27-45.jpeg
     
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  15. JD955SC

    JD955SC Senior Member

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    The little 110 volt migs are good for welding small non load bearing brackets on or thin sheet metal not for heavy duty stuff.

    now if you have a 240V mig that’s a different story.

    And the same parent company that owns Miller owns Hobart. Most of Hobarts line is base model versions of Miller welders. Great for home/farm type shops. Just make sure you are using enough welder for the job not a little 110V hot glue gun.
     
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  16. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    Mine is 220. Hobart 180.
     
  17. emmett518

    emmett518 Senior Member

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    You need a jackhammer with that!!
     
  18. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Now that will sandblast!
     
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  19. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    Everybody needs a good welder. Certainly pains me deep Hobart Bros. is no longer around. With ITW now owning Miller Electric, I feel the same is in store for them also, (eventually).

    If my old GB-318 Hobart ain't got enough ass behind it, This 4.236 Perkins Diesel powered 500A Hobart certainly does.

    upload_2022-1-28_10-51-58.jpeg
    upload_2022-1-28_10-52-29.jpeg
    upload_2022-1-28_10-53-2.jpeg

    Purchased this one so I could run my Hobart Bros. suitcase feeder I caught on sale while still in the navy back in 1986. These two work in perfect unison. I built a remote control for it so once course settings are dialed in, you can fine tune as you weld at the gun.
     
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  20. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    Very enviable! All I have these days is a 2007 Bobcat 250.