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Building logging roads in the BC interior

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by BDFT, Aug 4, 2012.

  1. BDFT

    BDFT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    265
    Location:
    Northwest BC
    Found myself loading rock the other day. Here's some pics.

    My saddlehorse. Cat EL240. 18000+ hrs but still pretty tight.
    Neufeld-2.jpg

    My view from the rock pit.
    Neufeld-5.jpg

    Cat 527 spreading rock.
    Neufeld-3.jpg

    Filling holes for the 8N.
    Neufeld-1.jpg

    Another shot of the 8N
    Neufeld-4.jpg

    Note that the logs are already processed. Often the roads are built after the wood is skidded and processed.
    The loader might be weeks behind. This particular outfit moves about 1000 cubic meters a day so no one waits for anybody.
    The skidders chase the bunchers and the processors chase the skidders. The loader chases everybody.
     
  2. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2007
    Messages:
    3,074
    Location:
    SoCal
    Nice pictures there. Thanks BDFT
     
  3. firetruck dvr.

    firetruck dvr. Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2008
    Messages:
    36
    Occupation:
    Full time firefighter engineer, and part time heav
    Location:
    Little Rock, AR
    Nice pics thanks for sharing!
     
  4. csquared

    csquared Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2006
    Messages:
    125
    Location:
    BC
    who are you working for? just doing 2 bundles on trucks? being just one deck, not a front and back deck, it looks like the logs are over 20 feet?...real tidy piles, must have some good processor operators.
     
  5. BDFT

    BDFT Senior Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2010
    Messages:
    265
    Location:
    Northwest BC
    We're cutting all short logs for Canfor in Houston. Optimum lengths are 20' to 12'. Three sets of 10' wide bunks on the trucks. Two on the trailer and one on the truck. They are running quad trailers on tridem trucks. In those pictures there just wasn't that much wood to process so the decks are small. In other places there are three decks piled up. The decks have to be neat or it takes forever to load and at 15 off highway loads a day you want to put a load on fairly fast.
     
  6. Doug1966

    Doug1966 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 5, 2011
    Messages:
    104
    Occupation:
    Woodworker
    Location:
    Victoria BC
    Any Chance You Know

    Hi Any chance you know the Imrie's. I built this for them as a christmas gift for Don from his kids. Thanks Doug.

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Hitachi350Man

    Hitachi350Man Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2007
    Messages:
    88
    Location:
    Pacific
    BDFT

    Is most of the logging road building in the bc interior done with a hoe or a cat?
    When pushing road are you also affected like the loggers by the seasons, i.e. spring, summer, fall, winter?
    Is there times of the year you can't build road due to weather or snow?

    Thanks!