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building a new heavy equipment shop?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by earthscratcher, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. check

    check Senior Member

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    I've built two container barns (not used as shop). Here's one of them. There are pros and cons. Good idea if you don't intend to pour a foundation. mt barn.jpg
     
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  2. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Can still use them on slab, set the anchor bolts at latch lugs, can then also set them Up off grade to keep more dry and taller center section.
     
  3. check

    check Senior Member

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    If you're going to pour a slab, it's not really cost-effective to use the containers. They make the inside of the shop smaller and the doors are tedious to get in and out of. You get four containers and forget which one a part is stored in and you waste a lot of time.
    In many states, portable buildings are not subject to property tax. Stand alone containers are good for storing junk you seldom use. No tax no depreciation. Put them together with a roof and they are subject to tax.
     
  4. bam1968

    bam1968 Senior Member

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    I agree with that not being cost effective. I don't claim to be an engineer by any means. That being said, a few years ago I tore down a hog confinement building that the concrete floor sat on @ 12" concrete 'pillars' (for lack of a better term). They were spaced @ 8' apart throughout the building. So, basically they dug a bunch of 12" post holes and filled them with concrete then poured a slab over them. I'm guessing they used this method instead of a footing because this particular building didn't have any kind of a footing. Basically I was wondering if a person could get by with basically setting a container on a bunch of those 'pillars' then could just pour a slab with footings between the containers? Like I said I'm no expert by any means........
     
  5. check

    check Senior Member

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    I think the purpose of pillars was to build on unstable clay or disturbed ground. The pillars get you down to solid ground below the frost line much cheaper than trying to do the same with a poured footing. Sometimes these pillars are used in conjunction with stem walls in questionable substrates.
    Yes, a pillar at every corner would be fine for a container. They stack em on ships several containers high with all the weight on the corners.
     
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  6. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I'm wanting to do the container thing up the hill from my shop.

    I would pour sono tube pillars where the corners sit and two in the middle. (6 pillars per conex) I've done it like that on several yards. There's no reason to put concrete under them, but I want to keep them level. Then I'll probably start with just leveled and rolled base rock in the middle, but leave it low enough to add concrete to the bottom of the conex floor height. I want to be able to pull two semi's and a crane in boom dolly or multiple cranes between the conexes. Just to keep my equipment out of the weather, sun and rain.

    I really like the white fabric buildings I've been inside, they are like working under a skylight during the day.

    The initial outlay is much less- 4 conexes at $3,000 per, plus the pillars. Then the fabric roof and tube trusses. And center filled with rolled base rock. A couple years down the road add the concrete, or even a "bay" at a time.
     
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  7. check

    check Senior Member

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    They are designed to handle their rated load (60K# or so) with all the weight on just the 4 corners. I have found they are pretty easy to level using a bottle jack (slightly tilted) on the upper flange of the channel iron perimeter.
     
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  8. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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    Occupation:
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    Built a shoestring budget shop to work out of last fall, and I'm mobile only. No machines in my shop but an occasional component. 32x40 pole barn with one 8' overhang, compacted gravel floor, 6.5" foam on exterior, R60 in ceiling. Structure materials cost $32K. Dirtwork cost $16K. 12x12 door was given to me by customer, along with a waste oil heater. Just a bare bones shop to keep my truck and tooling out of the weather. Don't have a picture of it dried in. As I get money I just add stuff to it.
     

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  9. Queenslander

    Queenslander Senior Member

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    When we built our shed we allowed for a container to form part of one wall.
    With an opening in the side, it’s made a cheap but strong extra room that we store oil and the like in.
    Another handy tool for a small shop are these drum trolleys.
    Just wheel the drum up to the machine and pump away.
    83549E2C-6790-4477-80C2-8A5AD6ECFD12.jpeg 221EACBF-0FF4-457A-9EAE-3B429DD1A236.jpeg E76BD1B1-6230-4509-A648-99F84706B1DA.jpeg
     
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  10. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I was going to put in the center stands, because I plan to cut doorways from the center of the building into the side of the conex. That way you could load things in and out of the conex without having to go from the long end.

    The side wall panels are what give the strength to the conex when it only has end support, and I plan to cut some of that out. A center support eliminates that problem. I've just got straight mast forklifts, with a telehandler you could maybe come from the end, but its not handy.
     
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  11. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    I've looked at a few of these in the past as part of business personal property appraisals. They work good for operations that expect to be in one place for more than a year but will eventually have to move somewhere else. Most have wood structures for roofing between two cans. The best one I've seen had asphalt for base but they only worked on trucks and components in that property. The cans were usually wired for 220 volt with welders on the inside and compressors landed on the opposite wall outside to decrease the noise. Most had some kind of heat because in this wet climate lots of slimy stuff will grow in there if not kept dry.
     
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  12. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    We had the Office versions of the Conex at the Nuke, paneled inside with 100a electric service and a separate 240 line connect for heat pump. Hot and moist in summer cold and moist in winter.
     
  13. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

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    Natural Light supplement and high ceilings. I have 14' ceiling and the top 24" or so of the exterior wall is skylight material. I do not recommend the clear for any wall other than one that faces north. Use opaque.

    Bridge crane - I cannot tell you how handy that is. I built it from scratch and traded sawmill work for the main beams, so not a whole lot of $$$ really.

    Radiant tube heat and good insulation for northern areas.

    Apron. Eaves/overhangs and gutters on the building.
     
    Last edited: Mar 16, 2019
  14. terex herder

    terex herder Well-Known Member

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    Some more things from my shop.

    Floor anchors are 1 3/8 Williams Form Engineering ASTM A 722 bars. Bars are anchored with a 1" plate, 40" under finish grade. Bars are in a pvc tube. Tie downs internal to the thick portion of the floor should be good to 75 tons per anchor. Bars are finished below grade with a coupling nut. Remove cover and screw a spare bar into the nut. There will be a crack around the heavy floor section.

    Run electric conduit under the slab. I have subpanels on two walls. No heavy power goes over an overhead door. I have both 240V and 480V panels.

    For your climate, lots of insulation. I have 3 1/2" under the wall and roof panels. After the structure was completed, 8" was added in the walls. The girts are fully insulated, with a white plastic on the inside of the insulation. 8' high white building panels line the inside. The roof purlins are also full of insulation. There is white strapping screwed on the bottoms of the purlins. Then white plastic was laid over the strapping, then the bats were laid on that before the roof was installed.

    If you put doors on the south wall, get extra light panels. My south door is a 9 panel, the bottom 2 panels and the top panel are solid, the 6 center panels have 11? windows.

    If its a cheap building they will omit a girt at 4' off the slab. You need that girt for strength and convenience of hanging stuff.

    Put windows at 16' in the south wall. Put the office on the south wall.

    Make sure the windows in the office are at residential height. My office windows are side sliders setting on the 4' girt. I don't like them. They should be residential single or double hung windows at more like 38".

    If you have a budget problem and have to build smaller than you need, build the width and the height. You can always add length. Tell the builder so the end for expansion will get a full rafter.
     
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  15. Steve Bowman

    Steve Bowman Well-Known Member

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    Spring for storage trusses - can't go wrong for storage space.
     
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