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building a new heavy equipment shop?

Discussion in 'Shop Talk' started by earthscratcher, Mar 12, 2019.

  1. Nige

    Nige Senior Member

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    Come up with a design footprint for the building that appears to work once you put benches, etc, in it.
    Then double the size............ you'll be amazed how many shops are nowhere near big enough for everything that has to go in them once they are actually built and it's pretty much too late to do anytrhing about it.
     
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  2. check

    check Senior Member

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    Heat and insulation can nearly double the cost of a shop if you go with any significant R value. Up North open wings on the eave sides can be a good compromise. Only half the structure would be enclosed and insulated, the rest only covered. There you can park long term low priority projects and work on them as weather permits. The wings can be dirt floor to keep taxes down. Disadvantage of this is that, being on the eave sides, they have lower ceilings. If you try to do this on the gable ends, you always have a machine to move before you can get another in the door.
     
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  3. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    The quarry at St. Charles had some massive shops, all air sent thru lines in the floors, mostly to Tower Jib cranes where the bases were used as extra air supply tanks. Had drains on those we hit at least once a week, do not remember them ever water loading too bad. Believe that foreman told me had embedded 2" sch 40 steel pipe (Welded) in the floors to the towers, came up alongside the bases and connected with flex line. Shops always too small, would end up working on half the workload Outside under eave awnings.
     
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  4. JD955SC

    JD955SC Senior Member

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    Small Indoor pressure washer bay for cleaning components to knock the mud off before tearing stuff apart.

    Good organizational/storage racks for chains, big prybars, rigging, cribbing, chocks, jumper cables, specialty tools, etc.

    A good set aside area for jackstands, jacks and oil drain pans and other things that have to stay on the floor but you don’t want in the way

    I’ve been wondering if it would be possible to pour concrete ramps to get a machine up off the ground for easier belly pan removal and work under the machine. At work we make do with running D3-D6Ks up on 6x6 blocks for some room working under them but it still isn’t fun.

    Position benches under reach of cranes

    Definitely good lighting. I’d love to have natural light without opening doors
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2019
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  5. Former Wrench

    Former Wrench Senior Member

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    This is a repeat, but steel rails and anchor posts embedded in the floor. Having a place to keep racks and shelves for parts and special tools. Extra fire extinguishers. A few hooks to hang coveralls, rain gear, winter coats. Plenty of electric outlets. Think ahead about a steam cleaner, where you would put it, and how to plumb in a sump. Having a press is nice too; buy new/used or homemade. Running water if possible to hose the floor once in awhile to remove mud and dirt. There's more but I don't want to put you in the poor-house before you get going.
     
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  6. RZucker

    RZucker Senior Member

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    A good alarm system with battery back up. Mine is setup to call me, the sheriff's department, and the alarm company. Both door and motion sensors. It also sends me an e-mail if it hasn't been set by 6 pm.
     
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  7. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    Kegerator! Fill a cup a few times and you won’t need anything else but an old lazy boy recliner!
     
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  8. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    OMG, now it comes, Wait for it, Wait!>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Popcorn Machine!!!!!!! Cannot forget Popcorn machine!!
     
  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Can see cribbing timbers or crane matt timbers for crawlers to run up on, not sure would like to try to set concrete ramps and run them up on them.
     
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  10. Junkyard

    Junkyard Senior Member

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    Oh yes of course. Can’t be without that. Imagine all the beer belches and popcorn farts! Which brings me to a new “must have”. Ventilation!!!
     
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  11. check

    check Senior Member

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    Steel against concrete = very slippery.
     
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  12. Numbfingers

    Numbfingers Well-Known Member

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    Parts washer, shop press, and a real heavy duty bench for disassembling components. Then another lightweight bench for laying out all the cleaned pieces of a broken down component. I like to be organized.
     
  13. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Like timbers as tend to get some bite on them from any form of grouser.
     
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  14. funwithfuel

    funwithfuel Senior Member

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    The only thing I would add to this already growing list would be to run the rails full length all the way out to and through the aprons. Maybe a third rail to support smaller crawlers.
     
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  15. Vetech63

    Vetech63 Senior Member

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    So if we add up all the suggestions here...……..is this a 250K shop? LOL
     
  16. funwithfuel

    funwithfuel Senior Member

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    Sounds a little too cheap, must be using imported labor.
     
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  17. Vetech63

    Vetech63 Senior Member

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    LOL The wife has been slacking on my back massages lately...……..told her I was going to import me a new masseuse. The look on her face told me that wasn't funny.
     
  18. check

    check Senior Member

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    You get a bunch of mechanics discussing how things should be done and you would think they are all millionaires.
     
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  19. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Depends how big. If you want just a single bay shop to work on one piece at a time, you might build the building for that, if you already have the ground. The shell of the building isn't expensive. Its the concrete, water, sewer, electric, insulation, windows, doors, compressor, overhead crane, etc. etc. etc.

    If you don't own the ground, and have to buy commercial zoned land, bring in water sewer elec, pour concrete, and want a 3 bay 70 x 100, I think you would be staring at $1 million.

    Now, if I was just wanting to get out of the sun and the wind. I think I would pour a 60' x 80' slab, and set 4 -40' high cube conexes around the outside perimeter. Then cover the center with a fabric arch building. But it doesn't get that cold by me.

    [​IMG] upload_2019-3-14_8-15-0.jpeg [​IMG]
     
  20. bam1968

    bam1968 Senior Member

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    I have been thinking about the container thing myself. 2fbe341b270400cddf235be53228e04d--shipping-container-barn-ideas-shipping-container-homes.jpg 2fbe341b270400cddf235be53228e04d--shipping-container-barn-ideas-shipping-container-homes.jpg images container shop.jpg
     
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