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Brush cutter question???

Discussion in 'Compact Track/Multi Terrain Loaders' started by CCW13, May 21, 2016.

  1. HRPServicesTX

    HRPServicesTX Well-Known Member

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    I think I'd still go for high flow because it would prob do better on the resale end too if you ever wanted/needed to sell it. Not to mention it'll just handle more things you throw at it.
     
  2. KSSS

    KSSS Senior Member

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    I have a high flow Diamond mower. It is excellent, very heavy duty, leaves a great finished product.
     
  3. pafarmer

    pafarmer Senior Member

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    KSSS,
    Would you happen to have a picture of what is left behind after the diamond goes through. They look like a serious cutter.
    How often do you have to replace the cutting bits on it.

    Thx
    Farmer
     
  4. HRPServicesTX

    HRPServicesTX Well-Known Member

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    I'm interested in seeing pics of that too. When I need to purchase a cutter I'm going to get that brand.

    Hey pafarmer...you ever order a set of those trelleborgs? I'll do a review of mine when I can use them on dry ground, been wet or muddy for weeks now.
     
  5. still learn'n

    still learn'n Senior Member

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    We demo'd a diamond and ran it on clearing around a pasture fence for 2 days and that thing is a beastly tree eating machine it bangs and vibrates around but it will grind and cut up trees! The diamond was supposed to be good up to a 7" tree! And then my boss went and bought a bradco and I went to a job and mowed off up to 5-6" trees with it and I didn't like it as well as the diamond but it is cheaper. If all you are mowing if grass and weeds I would think a bradco out such would be plenty I didn't look at the blue diamond.

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
     
  6. Todd v.

    Todd v. Well-Known Member

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    Overgrown pasture before with the diamomd mower

    uploadfromtaptalk1464172872460.jpg

    After
    uploadfromtaptalk1464172964450.jpg

    Here is a spot that had a good bit of wood in it afterwards

    uploadfromtaptalk1464173061526.jpg

    uploadfromtaptalk1464173081590.jpg

    When the ground is flat the diamond mower will really chop up everything left behind without getting into the dirt.

    As far as Hi/Low flow. I only run mine in Hiflo when doing heavier stuff, 3" and up or if it's very thick. For the lighter stuff and pasture it doesn't help much other than to burn more fuel. But when you get to the thicker wood it makes all the difference in the world.
     
  7. CCW13

    CCW13 Well-Known Member

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    That did a nice job! I'm going with the Blue Diamond standard flow I believe. I'm just using it personally and won't be clearing any large trees. I appreciate everyones help.
     
  8. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . .

    Todd v. Good illustrative pictures . . . I take it mowing of that pasture will be an ongoing job to keep the regrowth at bay so how much does it cot per acre and how often must it be done?

    I am finding that once a paddock is cleared such as you have done with the diamond mower by far the most economical way of maintaining control is with a small ZRT.

    Cheers.
     
  9. Todd v.

    Todd v. Well-Known Member

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    I don't have any pasture that I maintain, I normally just hit them the first time so it can be mowed with a tractor/bushog. Much cheaper that way. I may do this one though because it's in a polo club and those folks don't seem to care what it costs, just that they get the service they expect. That pasture had been growing for a few years unkept and there was a lot of cleanup of smaller trees and low limbs and a 8' tall thicket that ran down the center where the water flowed. I made a lot of unhappy rabbits. Anyhow, 5 acres in 6.5 hours there. If it's mostly just thick grass and small scrub here and there I get about 2-3 acres an hour (6' mower). I charge $100/hr for mowing when I can but some people want a set price so I make sure I cover my guess on hours when I bid them. People around here seem to charge around $65/hr or $25/acre for conventional bushoging on maintained pasture.

    The diamond mower does a much nicer job than a conventional tractor/bushog when the pasture is overgrown because it spins lots faster (even running in std flow) and there's no corners where the material can hide and/or drop out. Less debris and grass piles.
     
  10. Scrub Puller

    Scrub Puller Senior Member

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    Yair . . .

    Todd v. Thanks mate for reply, it's always interesting to see how other folks handle tasks.

    Cheers.
     
  11. CCW13

    CCW13 Well-Known Member

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    Thank you all again. This is a great place to ask questions and get answers. Not all boards are like that.
     
  12. pafarmer

    pafarmer Senior Member

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    Todd,
    Cool depiction of a before and after mulching job...thanks for taking the time to share...
     
  13. Todd v.

    Todd v. Well-Known Member

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    You're welcome. I thought I posted a before on that second one, guess not. Anyhow it looked like this. Ha

    [​IMG]
     
  14. CCW13

    CCW13 Well-Known Member

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    That's a heck of a difference. I can't wait to try mine.
     
  15. JNB

    JNB Senior Member

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    You'll love that cutter. Here's a few photos showing the results of cutting with the inexpensive Brush Buster on a SVL75.

    51 01.jpg 51 02.jpg 51 03.jpg
     
  16. CCW13

    CCW13 Well-Known Member

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    I got to play for just a bit tonight but so far so good. I had fun!
    [​IMG]
     
  17. CCW13

    CCW13 Well-Known Member

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    One more thing. How do you all hook your safety chain?
     
  18. HRPServicesTX

    HRPServicesTX Well-Known Member

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    I'm liking the gaurd for the hydros on the machine.

    You mean to chain it down to transport? I use big transport chain, 4 chains in each corner of the machine, 2' long, with 1 big hook. Hook to the machine, and ratchet boomer on the trailer to the chain on the machine.
     
  19. CCW13

    CCW13 Well-Known Member

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    I'm sorry I meant the safety chain on the mower. I've never used one of these before.
     
  20. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    I think you're referring to the safety chain on your new Blue Diamond brush cutter, that should be covered in the owners manual that came with it. The idea is to attach the safety chain to an anchor point on the front of the machine with just enough slack in the chain that when the operator raises the loader arms the chain will get taught before the cutter raises high enough to expose the operator to the cutter blades, to prevent the operator from being exposed to flying debris with cutter in a raised position. Welcome to our legal world where you can sue McDonalds because coffee is actually served hot (who knew?). :)