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Biggest Telehandler?

Discussion in 'Forklifts/Telehandlers' started by Tri-Star, Aug 15, 2008.

  1. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    Yea 60 feet forward reach :cool2:eek::eek::notworthy:notworthy
     
  2. Man of God

    Man of God Member

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    Anyone know anything about old Pettibone Carry Lifts?
     
  3. I AM IRONMAN

    I AM IRONMAN Well-Known Member

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    I've been around Pettibones for years, they were good machines in there day. They still build them but they have had a lot of trouble staying in business. A lot of their business was in sawmills, some of the models were the Super 10, Super 15, and Super 20. I think they had a lot of other models too, including the shooting boom types. They usually had Detroit diesels or Cummings for engines. Good sturdy machines!
     
  4. catc15

    catc15 Active Member

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    I would have to agree, the xtreme is and excellent brand of machinery. I've had the personal opportunity of operating the XRM1267. Before I got to operate that I was running just a typical mast type rough terrain forklift, going from that to the xtreme telehandler was awsome. It has great visibility, great strength, great stability, and great amount of power when needed.
     
  5. albertozordan

    albertozordan Member

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    I think that Xtreme telehandlers are manifactured by the italian company Dieci, is it right?
     
  6. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    made in NV as I know it. Not sure who owns the company for real.
     
  7. albertozordan

    albertozordan Member

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    Ok. It was just because a saw that the compact model are from Dieci, that is an italian manifacturer but sicerely I don't know if it is the same for the biggest models too.
     
  8. ForksNI

    ForksNI Member

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    albertozordan - the 'low mount' & slewing telehandlers are made by Dieci for Xtreme, basically they are just machines from the Dieci European range in orange instead of yellow.
     
  9. albertozordan

    albertozordan Member

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    Oh nice.
    Any other not european manufacturer of big telehandlers?
     
  10. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    what do you mean by slewing? thanks
     
  11. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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  12. ForksNI

    ForksNI Member

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    Yeah its basically a telehandler mounted on a slewing structure - the Manitou pictured earlier in the thread is a smaller version. Our company has the larger 25metre Manitous (newer versions of the one in the video) & having come off a 'ordinary' telehandler to go on to a slewing one, in my opinion they are definatly the way forward - especially with the radio control for the crane winch or jib attachments - no relying on hand signals just stand where you can see everything & work from there!
     
  13. Speedpup

    Speedpup Senior Member

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    25+ years ago I said they would end up sticking forks on a Cherry pickers.
     
  14. ForksNI

    ForksNI Member

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    The slewing telehandler is basically that idea the other way round - you take the forks off to put the radio control personnel carrying basket on, which along with the crane attachments, is designed & of course certified for use with the machine. One of the Merlo telehandler dealers in Europe (in conjunction with Merlo) has designed & built a track mounted fully radio controlled machine - the Giraf Track - designed mainly as a cherry picker but fully certified to be used with forks & crane attachments. Another European manufacture - Sennebogen - has machine in its range which is mainly a mobile crane but again certified to be used a cherry picker & slewing telehandler
     

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    Last edited: May 17, 2009
  15. albertozordan

    albertozordan Member

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    Cool! Even if I'm in the telehandlers businness I've never heard about Sennebogen.
    It's nice to learn stuff from you guys!
     
  16. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    I didn't know Sennebogen made telehandlers, not that it really surprises me. It seems they only sell a normal telehandler with a lifting cab in NA. On bigger construction jobs around here they stockpile all the building materials or atleast until they run out of room. I can see slewing forklifts being really good at building stockpiles and lifting everything were it needs to go. Wouldn't it be a bit of a waste to have the slewing forklift running back and forth from the building to the stockpile? Still need a telehandler to unbuild the stockpile and bring it to the rotator. I guess there could be two rotators one at the building and one at the stockpile with a site truck running between.
     
  17. tonka

    tonka Senior Member

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    Sennebogen's rule!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! can we see whats behind pic # 3?
     
  18. ForksNI

    ForksNI Member

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    Yeah they sell that one over here to the 308 I think it is they mainly go into waste & recycling applications. On our sites the materials are stockpiled to where they are being used so there is little or no travelling to gather up materials - however occasionally with that there still is a small degree of running about eg more vauable items are in a central shed on the site so when there needed they have to be brought up or occasionally stillages of scaffolding, bales of planks etc up from or down to the scaffolders compound. Apart from that once the machine is set up it can sit without turning a wheel or even having the forks on for 2-3 days. Doing it that way certainly keeps the dirt & dust down, I've been on sites before where everything has been centrally stockpiled - in winter mud & dirt everywere & in summer dust everywere because of machines running around.

    Tonka - Unfortunatly I don't have pics/details of the other machines in pic 3 but I wouldn't turn down a go on the scrap handler ! !
     

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  19. tonka

    tonka Senior Member

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  20. barklee

    barklee Senior Member

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    That Giraf is amazing! We have been thinking of purchasing a 2450 mrt this year. It really seems to be very difficult to manuver and very heavy. Is that a true assumption, also are there any other weak points worth mentioning? We currently have two Lull 1044's and a terex 1056 now, seems to me that this would far our perform those hands down!