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BC logging equipment left to rust

skadill

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Jan 30, 2011
Messages
1,404
Location
B.C. Canada
Done Yarding for Now

Think its a washington 78.
 

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BDFT

Senior Member
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Sep 12, 2010
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265
Location
Northwest BC
It is indeed a 78. I've spent many hours either wrenching on one just like it or sitting in the seat. Missing the haulback drum and planetary among other things.
 

Greatwestcam

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Sep 14, 2010
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384
Location
Northern Alberta
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Driver/Mechanic
This one looks a little more operational. Westar Washington 78 grapple yarder Arrow Lakes.
 

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furpo

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Joined
Jun 26, 2010
Messages
319
Location
New Zealand
It is indeed a 78. I've spent many hours either wrenching on one just like it or sitting in the seat. Missing the haulback drum and planetary among other things.

What was the planatary interlock on these machines like? Looks like a more efficent system that a slip clutch. Must be a reason no one else did it.
 

BDFT

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Sep 12, 2010
Messages
265
Location
Northwest BC
The early 78's like th eone shown above had a two giant gears on the end of the haulback. The big case directly to the right of the guyline drums. A set of planetary gears controlled the speed of each gear which was driven by the main driveline on one side and a hydraulic motor on the other. Its kind of hard to explain without many pictures, which I really should scan one of these days. The end result was a yarder that was simple to operate although far too complex and grossly overengineered in some respects. The operator had a trans conrol for forward and reverse and another lever to slack and tighten the haulback and/or the mains. With the rigging running out, push the lever forward and the haulback ran slower than the mains and the rigging slacked on the fly, pull the lever back and the mains slowed, tightening the rigging. You didn't have to ride any brakes or slip any clutches although each drum had an air clutch and a big band brake they were just for stopping. You could park the machine with the rigging in the air and it would stay there with the brakes off and the clutches engaged if you set the lever right. It would also slowly creep in or out if you didn't and I've seen more than one haulback drum snarled up as the line slowly creeped out after the rigging was on the ground. I've never done that of course.

The newer 78A's had a large doubled ended and very expensive hydraulic motor in place of the haulback planetary gear that was quieter, faster and easier to repair but also prone to failure. at least on the machine I ran. When that happened you better have deep pockets.
That's a very brief and rambling explanation and its a lot easier to do it than it is to explain it.

Someone once told me that the Washington yarders were designed by engineers that had left Boeing. I don't know if that is true or not but some of the things I saw on the 78's and 108's made me want to believe it. I think that's one of the reasons that Madill lasted so long. You could fix them with a big hammer, cold chisel and a crescent wrench.
 

Jumbo

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Joined
Nov 12, 2010
Messages
693
Location
Black Diamond WA
Occupation
retired
The early 78's like th eone shown above had a two giant gears on the end of the haulback. The big case directly to the right of the guyline drums. A set of planetary gears controlled the speed of each gear which was driven by the main driveline on one side and a hydraulic motor on the other. Its kind of hard to explain without many pictures, which I really should scan one of these days. The end result was a yarder that was simple to operate although far too complex and grossly overengineered in some respects. The operator had a trans conrol for forward and reverse and another lever to slack and tighten the haulback and/or the mains. With the rigging running out, push the lever forward and the haulback ran slower than the mains and the rigging slacked on the fly, pull the lever back and the mains slowed, tightening the rigging. You didn't have to ride any brakes or slip any clutches although each drum had an air clutch and a big band brake they were just for stopping. You could park the machine with the rigging in the air and it would stay there with the brakes off and the clutches engaged if you set the lever right. It would also slowly creep in or out if you didn't and I've seen more than one haulback drum snarled up as the line slowly creeped out after the rigging was on the ground. I've never done that of course.

The newer 78A's had a large doubled ended and very expensive hydraulic motor in place of the haulback planetary gear that was quieter, faster and easier to repair but also prone to failure. at least on the machine I ran. When that happened you better have deep pockets.
That's a very brief and rambling explanation and its a lot easier to do it than it is to explain it.

Someone once told me that the Washington yarders were designed by engineers that had left Boeing. I don't know if that is true or not but some of the things I saw on the 78's and 108's made me want to believe it. I think that's one of the reasons that Madill lasted so long. You could fix them with a big hammer, cold chisel and a crescent wrench.



The original Washingtons were top notch and easy to work with and on according to donkey doctors I knew. When Formco (I think that was the spelling) bought them out things changed. The story went around Seattle that the first thing Formco did was dump all the casting molds. Adrian Estep was one of Washington's greatest treasures. Louis Bianchi who spent 50 years at Washington was a fellow who had a treasure trove of stories. Louis did a good job of describing Washington's demise after Formco.

Alas, like many other companies who were bought in the late 70's Washington was run into the ground by the new owner.

I always figured Madill was popular because they were cheaper that a Washington or Skagit.:stirthepot

That comment should rile someone up!
 

Hayesno1

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Jun 24, 2009
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Denmark
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Project manager
Found this one last year. It seems it has not been moved for some years...
 

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075

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Feb 21, 2011
Messages
518
Location
Port McNeill
Occupation
Running Supersnorkel
It doses not travel but they use it all the time to load and unload trailers. It looks like that because two years ago a slide came through that area and covered every thing in 2 feet of mud and wood.
 

DBDLS

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Joined
Mar 11, 2010
Messages
225
Location
Campbell River, BC
Occupation
Heavy Equipment Operator
Could someone explain what the stinger arrangement on the Washington 78's undercarriage is all about? I am curious.
 

lg junior

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Joined
Feb 25, 2011
Messages
205
Location
oregon
Could someone explain what the stinger arrangement on the Washington 78's undercarriage is all about? I am curious.

The stinger has the raising and lowering cylinder for the mast and gantry.

In the travel position the mast and gantry are supported by the stinger.
 

skadill

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Joined
Jan 30, 2011
Messages
1,404
Location
B.C. Canada
Kenworth 850

Whats left of an old Saunders truck by the looks of it.Pacific P16,I guessed the Saunders colors automaticly meant KW850.
 

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Greatwestcam

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Northern Alberta
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Driver/Mechanic
Had a friend that drove for Saunders back in the 70's, up at Kemano, when he started there he had a brand new Pacific P16 and all the other trucks on the haul were HDX's at that time, well when he headed up the road listening to all the calls on the radio he tucked into a turn out and here comes this HDX pulling pup smoking buy and the driver calls on the radio "who the hell are you? this is HAYES country". they had a lot of trucks there, think he said 25 or 30 HDX's, they would load out of the lake and haul up and over the mountain down to the salt chuck. said if they got 3 months out of a 91000 clark diff that was good. later when the Kenworths came with 121 clarks they never lost a diff. He had a ton of cool pictures and stories to go with them. RIP Mike P.
 

lowbed driver

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Joined
Feb 14, 2012
Messages
145
Location
Northwest B.C
Had a friend that drove for Saunders back in the 70's, up at Kemano, when he started there he had a brand new Pacific P16 and all the other trucks on the haul were HDX's at that time, well when he headed up the road listening to all the calls on the radio he tucked into a turn out and here comes this HDX pulling pup smoking buy and the driver calls on the radio "who the hell are you? this is HAYES country". they had a lot of trucks there, think he said 25 or 30 HDX's, they would load out of the lake and haul up and over the mountain down to the salt chuck. said if they got 3 months out of a 91000 clark diff that was good. later when the Kenworths came with 121 clarks they never lost a diff. He had a ton of cool pictures and stories to go with them. RIP Mike P.


Had an Uncle who worked the boom boats at Kemano , mostly in the lake, a little in the salt chuck at the dump. He himself hauled about 35 loads total with the HDX. Mostly on weekends when they needed trucks moved and all the drivers were off.
He has alot of good stories about his time there as well. I drove the road from Kemano to the lake in the early 90's. talk about hills. Shoot goats right from the pick up.
 

Hayesno1

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2 old KW loggers finding Peace in Campbell River
 

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Hayesno1

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More rusty trucks from Campbell River. KW is Canadian built. Pics were shot at Tom Turners place.
 

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skadill

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Jan 30, 2011
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Location
B.C. Canada
Old Hitachi UH181 Log Loader

Note backspar mount brackets,which was a little rare for a loader,and raised boom pin mounts.
 

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