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Any hope of getting this pin out?

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by Andy1845c, Aug 25, 2021.

  1. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    I guess that sheared off grease zerk is why JD put a screw in the eye when it was new.
    If the end of the pin is deformed from beating on it you may be screwed as far as pounding the pin out.
    Are both ends of the pin "deformed" ?
    If they are you may be forced to cut the pin now.
     
  2. Andy1845c

    Andy1845c Well-Known Member

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    I don't know why they would put a screw in there. I was sure it was supposed to be a zerk. Huh. Interesting.
    I am giving up on the pin for the moment. But thank you for giving me a reason to buy a new hammer......
    I honestly considered just making a new on on the old lathe I have, but wasn't sure how hard it needs to be.

    Both side are starting to mush. Thats kinda why I quit. I felt like I was on my way to a mess. I do like all the tips. Every time I come here for advice you guys don't let me down. It's much appreciated. Does anyone know of a pneumatic tool for something like this? Like a large air chisel?
     
  3. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    Take the stabilizer off and press it out. 100 ton press will make a lot of pins move.
     
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  4. Billrog

    Billrog Senior Member

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    Try turning the pin 1/2 a turn with a big pipe wrench then try knocking it out. there may be a grove wore in it hanging it up on the rod eye.
     
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  5. Andy1845c

    Andy1845c Well-Known Member

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    I mused in my head about this. I wondered about the chances of breaking the ear off. haha

    I think I would lance the pin out and pay up for a new one before I tried to get the pin holding the arm to the machine out, then try and support that thing in a press. haha
     
  6. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    here is the screw .
    screw.jpg
     
  7. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    So with the bolt instead of a zerk... the pivot is never greased. I wonder if welding a nut on the pin will let an impact wrench turn the pin loose. Seems the pin is either frozen to the rod or the ears. Not both since the stabilizer rotates the pin through its arc. Any body ever try it ?
     
  8. Andy1845c

    Andy1845c Well-Known Member

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    Its frozen to the ears.

    I wonder if you are supposed to take that bolt out, put a zerk in, grease, then replace the bolt? I'm sure that totally happened.....
     
  9. JLarson

    JLarson Senior Member

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    I've had to cut a lot of outrigger pins, big zip disc, carbide sawzall blades or one some real sloppy ones I've put a 14" hot saw in there lol.
     
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  10. hosspuller

    hosspuller Senior Member

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    Billrog reminded me how I got the pin out of my outrigger. Penetrating oil and knocking the pin in one direction, then the other. Tiny movement at first, then larger. The rust expands and trying to move in one direction builds a wedge. Reciprocating motion combined with oil spreads the rust out.
     
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  11. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

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    They probably decided that pin doesn't move enough to justify a grease fitting, or grease actually wore it faster. And it's not wore out is it? Like hosspuller said, if you can get it to move, it will move back and forth, and you can get it out. If you can't get it to move, you need more force, or rebuild it just the way you are. Smooth those scrapes and forget about it, they'll get scraped again soon enough.

    Building a pin driving animal could be the solution, like a 2" pipe (or DOM) you bolt, strap, or weld in place, then machine a piston of ten to twenty pounds that fits the bore, then add a bead cheetah to the end of the pipe?
     
  12. Swetz

    Swetz Senior Member

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    If you are not going to take the cylinder off, I would suggest using a angle die grinder with the scotchlock pads (not the sandpaper pads) to clean and smooth the chrome. The secret is to remove all high points as they will cut the seals. Low points will not cut seals, but will allow small leaks over time.
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Willie B

    Willie B Senior Member

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    There are a number of cases where John Deere, and other manufacturers choose not to lubricate as grease will hold grit & allow it to wear for a long time. These stabilizer feet don't see much motion & they are always in the dirt.
     
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  14. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    Now that the rod is out of the barrel I don't think the pin needs to be removed. IMHO.
    Out of curiosity I would drill that grease passage and see if the bushing actually has hole in it for grease.
    If it does, it might be possible to force oil in it with a port-a-power.
    I have seen it successfully done. A couple of times it required heating the rod eye and using the porta-a-power together.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2021
  15. Mike-G

    Mike-G Member

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    I had an outrigger with a stuck pin recently. I first used penetrating oil and a sledge hammer with no success. Then I remembered I had bought a hydraulic gear puller from (harbor freight, did I say that?) for just cases like this. I think it's a ten ton. It worked great. I think it cost a hundred bucks. Hope this helps. This site has always helped me. It's great.
     
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  16. 1693TA

    1693TA Senior Member

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    I've got a lot of those type pins removed in three pieces after slicing them with a thin grinding wheel, (.045). I made a small "chop saw" using a DeWalt 5" grinder with an electromagnetic base and using either 24VDC, or 12VDC from the vehicle's battery for power, it stays put. You pull on the handle holding the disc against the pin and it walks through it easy enough.

    Once you get the center out of the pin, not much force is required to break the stub ends free in the ears.
     
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  17. rickw

    rickw Well-Known Member

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    I had the same issuw w/ my Case superL. One side of the pine was siezed in the ear, the other was not. There was enough gap between the eye and the yoke that I could use my Stihl 14" cut off saw and cut the pin and remove 2/3 of it the put 1" bar thru the one ear and eye which centered it nice and drove it out with a large sledge.
     
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  18. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    My Stihl 14" hot saw would also be my choice also if a sledge didn't do the deed.
    Even if the gap is widened a little from the saw blade a couple of washers would fill it.
     
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  19. Welder Dave

    Welder Dave Senior Member

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    Welding a nut on the pin may work to turn the pin with an large impact wrench or breaker bar. The heat should at least break the rust at the welded side.
     
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  20. Andy1845c

    Andy1845c Well-Known Member

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    Someone else said this too I think. It’s actually a good idea and I half want to try it. Weld a large nut on it and use a 3/4 or 1” impact on it while pounding the other end