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Another lonely forum

Discussion in 'Mills' started by CM1995, Mar 14, 2007.

  1. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    I don't know anything about mills but this forum needs a post. Come on pavement guys!:D
     
  2. Electra_Glide

    Electra_Glide Senior Member

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    The only thing I know about mills is that they don't like concrete. Worked on a job two years ago where they had the paving contractor come in and mill the old parking lot where a major addition was going to go. We removed all the sidewalks and concrete stairs around the old lot. The paving contractor showed up, unloaded and hit a piece of the old sidewalk that was actually UNDER the parking lot as he was halfway through his first pass. Spent the next few hours fixing the machine.

    Joe
     
  3. hoeman600

    hoeman600 Senior Member

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    out here in cali they call"em grinders :pointhead
     
  4. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    This has to be a terminology thing...so OK...What the hell is a mill??

    In my service days a mill was an Boxing torment comprising two opposing tems of 10...you got 60 seconds to beat the daylights out of your opponent....I was lucky...I generally was able to get my nose bent over one way and the get it punched back straight again!:cool:

    (Hi-jack in progress:D )
     
  5. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    Hello Squizzy...It is called a milling machine, it mills or chews asphalt surfaces. Does a great job but it doesn't like concrete. You don't have these down under?

    milllg[1].jpg
     
  6. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    So its a cold Planer then?
     
  7. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    I never heard it called that before, but I would imagine that they are one in the same...anyone else have any input? Is there a difference?
     
  8. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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  9. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    Yup, they are the same thing. I knew them as a "cold planer" to begin with then learned they were also called "mills" or "grinders" for short.


    Or maybe Georgia is really Down Under. :beatsme :D
     
  10. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    We had a milling machine that did a job for us this past summer. It was the type that would chew up the asphalt/chipseal, but didn't have the conveyor attachment. The road was mostly chipseal with a lot of asphalt patches and was in very poor condition.
    So it milled one side of the road first, depositing the material underneath it as it went. I leveled and widened the road (with the grader) to the proper width. Did the same after he milled the other side. After he was completely done I shaped the road up giving it a proper crown.
    We then hauled 6 inches of crushed gravel on the road and resealed it. Road turned out great. The milled material made an excellent base and we never had to haul any pit run.
     
  11. murray83

    murray83 Senior Member

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    I haven't seen a road chipsealed since the early 90's I think I was in grade 3 when they did the road across from me.

    I hear the parts for those rigs aren't cheap,guy from miller once told me a price for a part and I was pretty surprised.
     
  12. hoeman600

    hoeman600 Senior Member

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    the bits on the drum need changed constantly:Banghead . as for names i have herd the bits called bull *** bits:confused:
     
  13. telescooper

    telescooper Well-Known Member

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    It's nice see that this forum is getting looked at. Mills, grinders, or whatever you call them are great pieces of equipment to operate. I spent alot of time around, under, and operating them. Most of my time was spent road widening. One thing is for sure at the end of the day, you will be filthy, and pooped out. They need constant attention and maintenance. Burried manholes, or other steel objects, generally bring a stop to your operation in a hurry.:beatsme Also the conveyor belts can jam with rocks, or large pieces of pavement, if not caught early these jams can cause a belt failure. Team work is very important between the ground man and operator. A good team is very productive. Another good thing about these machines are the paver, and widener guys will cover your messup's. Watch out for the bees.
     
  14. CEwriter

    CEwriter Senior Member

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  15. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    The ones I have worked with will do concrete, but IIRC $800-$900 a hr. for a 4' or 6'er. I've heard them called all of thee above.
     
  16. Motor Grader

    Motor Grader Well-Known Member

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    Contractors and public works officials at the National Pavement Expo were introduced to an innovative new system developed to improve ride quality and extend the life of asphalt roads and highways, without repaving.
    The Roadmaster Ride Quality Improvement System was demonstrated at the nearby Music City Motorplex (Nashville Raceway) by Champion Motor Graders and its development partners.
    The flagship of the system is Champion’s new Roadmaster RP626 Asphalt Profiler, a unique piece of road finishing equipment that mounts a 6’ grinder cutting head under the front frame of a Champion C60 Motor Grader. The RP626 Asphalt Profiler smooths asphalt surfaces by grinding away any bumps and irregularities within tolerances of 1/8th inch or less.
    The complete 3-step Roadmaster system follows up the smoothing process with a sealer to fill any remaining cracks in the surface and then applies a rejuvenator that restores life and resiliency to old asphalt.
    Bryan Abernathy, Vice President Sales & Marketing at Champion Motor Graders, says, "They had done their homework on how the smoothing, sealing and rejuvenating process could save millions of dollars for municipalities and counties every year.
    Maintaining ride quality at a reasonable cost has become a key challenge for planners and contractors in recent years, too. Our graders have been a valuable tool for safe and affordable road maintenance for 25 years. Now we can offer a new solution that goes even further to reduce costs for taxpayers."
    With a background in maintaining asphalt runways for military airports, Jim Wasson collaborated on developing the Roadmaster concept with Charlie Freeburn, a specialist in finishing the paved surfaces for drag strips and race tracks. The pair first built their own version of the RP626 profiler before showing the idea to Champion.
    Wasson says that customers in the motorsport market have been more than impressed by test results on their tracks. At 200 mph, he says, "small bumps in the road make a pretty big difference in performance and safety!' But for public roads and highways, the practical value of the Roadmaster system is in the cost savings in the restoration of paved roads and in extending their useful life. "Refinishing the existing road surface with the Roadmaster system is significantly faster and lower in cost than resurfacing or rebuilding the road. We have been completing 2 lane/miles of roadway in a single 8-hour shift, including the sealer and rejuvenator applications. Contractors and maintenance crews can do the job with less equipment, less material and, compared to other methods of road improvement, there’s almost no disruption to traffic."
    According to Wasson, improved ride quality is a major factor in the lifecycle of a road surface. A smoother road results in reduced wear and less impact from the vehicles that drive on it. Meanwhile, taxpayers get the added value of a safer, more comfortable ride that reduces fatigue, improves fuel efficiency and minimizes wear on their vehicle.
     

    Attached Files:

  17. telescooper

    telescooper Well-Known Member

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    After the surface is profiled what happens to the millings?
     
  18. Countryboy

    Countryboy Senior Member

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    They are reused in the asphalt production process at an asphalt plant.
     
  19. Grader4me

    Grader4me Senior Member

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    When we have a road milled in our area, the millings are stockpiled and reused for shoulder material etc.
     
  20. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    Lots of plants reuse them in the new HMA mix but our local one doesn't. Maybe it's not set up for it? :beatsme
    Here the milling's are used for base under new/rebuilt roads or sold for use on driveways etc. If it is milled fine enough or run through a crusher again it is very durable on driveways. I used it on mine until the price doubled as everyone caught on to it. :(