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An unexpected joiner.

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Snowbeast428, Apr 30, 2019.

  1. Snowbeast428

    Snowbeast428 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2019
    Messages:
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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Evening everyone. So I joined this forum for an unconventional reason that hopefully is okay but I saw nothing against it, I'm a game developer and one of the vehicles in my game is based of a CAT D9G 66A. With realism being the goal I thought that joining the forums would help me gain the info I need to make the vehicle behave as realistically as possible.
     
  2. mg2361

    mg2361 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2016
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    Occupation:
    Equipment Mechanic
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Welcome to HEF Snow;)!
     
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  3. Snowbeast428

    Snowbeast428 Member

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    Location:
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    Well thank you very much. I probably won't be active much since the dozer comes much later in development.
     
  4. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2012
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    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    Well I can't be much if any help on the D9G as I only did some basic work on a couple, change radiator and adjust brakes on one.

    One possible thought I might have would be check out any trade schools in your area and see if they offer heavy equipment operators classes. Now I doubt they will have a D9G for you to run but just about any older dozer might give you some feel for how a dozer works.

    If you have enough land you can play on maybe even think about renting a small dozer for a weekend?
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2019
  5. Snowbeast428

    Snowbeast428 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2019
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    Location:
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    That is a possibility although the controls have changed nowadays I know that for sure and most schools have changed over to dozers with that layout. I know general operation slightly but i might ask someone on here for more help.

    I prefer it be a d9g directly since well... I'm going for extreme realism for this game. I want it to be as realistic and as angering as it is real life.
     
  6. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
    Location:
    Northwest
    Steering clutches worked by pulling the levers and power would be disconnect from that particular track. The machine would steer that direction depending on the amount of resistance in the form of a hill or a load on the blade. Brakes worked on the pedals and were usually used for the most part when there wasn't much resistance to cause a turn from the hill or a blade load. It also allowed the machine to pivot steer. Really good operators seldom used the brakes when the machine was in production.
    The blade control was on a lever on the right side. Pushing the lever toward the front of the machine caused the blade to go down while pulling toward the rear of the machine caused the blade to lift. Moving the lever to the left caused the left side of the blade to tilt down while moving the lever to the right caused the right side corner of the blade to go down. The key thing about the blade control is that it didn't react as soon as you moved the lever. Every D9G or H that I had ever been on reacted the same on the blade. It took some time on the machine for that delay to be learned and imprinted into your arm and hand so you could operate the machine smoothly.
    There were multiple types of rippers installed on D9s. The Cat four barrel ripper had a lever on the right side that was surrounded by a plate. The plate had four slots where you could push the lever into. Pushing the lever to the right or away from the operator usually caused the ripper to drop. Pulling the lever toward the operator caused the ripper to raise. Pushing the lever into the forward would changed the angle of the tooth to either extend the upper cylinders and move the tooth closer to the machine or retract the cylinders moving the tooth away from the machine into a steeper angle. Moving the lever into the rear slot was the opposite effect. The tooth angle was made steep when starting the rip and then supposed to be moved to a lesser angle after the tooth had penetrated the rock. The lesser angle at nearly horizontal had the effect of sharpening the tooth and lifted the rock vertically into relief. Many times though, in my career, the operators would just leave the tooth at near vertical and blunt the tooth and put all kinds of extra wear on the shank and causing the machine to burn a lot more fuel. The delay effect between moving the lever was also still in the ripper controls but wasn't as noticeable.
     
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  7. Snowbeast428

    Snowbeast428 Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2019
    Messages:
    5
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    I see,that steering system won't be difficult to implement control scheme wise most likely but physically creating it might be difficult. Do you know how the pony engine start up went? So far I managed to figure this much out from a video:

    Step 1: Fuel to Pony motor

    Step 2: Pony run switch set to On

    Step 3: Dozer set to start

    Step 4: Pony clutch lever in disengaged

    Step 5: Button start (random chance to work)

    Step 6: Let pony idle for a few

    Step 7: Engage engage pony clutch and let it turn engine for a few minutes

    step 8: Kick lever to run setting

    Step 9: Wait for the sound of pony motor to jump up (Automatically disengages from engine) as engine turns under its own power.

    Step 10: Shut off pony motor

    Step 11: Shut off pony fuel.

    step 12: Doze time.
     
  8. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
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    Like I said I'm no way an expert on D9G's and the only two I even touched were "modern" machines with direct electric start.

    But I think I read that the common/correct way to shut off the pony engine was to shut off fuel and let it run out of gas in the carb before shutting off electrical switch.

    Believe the reason to do it that way had to due with the float valve in carb getting damaged from vibration if left full. John C. can you back me up or correct me if I'm full of BS?

    Also don't forget that I believe those pony engine also had hand cranks if batteries were dead, again John C. am I right on that point?

    Might be a good point to add to the program if someone fails to turn off the switch have the battery dead the next start up and make them us the hand crank!

    And also don't the pony transmissions have a two speed in them, for extreme cold starts?
     
  9. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    All the D9s I've been around had direct electric start. One place I worked had a D7 17A, 1 D8 13A and 4 D8 14A models with pony motors. All had crank start in addition to the electric starters but I had only ever seen one cranking handle and only knew one operator that tried to use it. The crane in my avatar had a pony motor for the D318 Cat engine and it had a rope start if the battery was dead. The controls were on the inside of the cab though so I have no idea how they figured there would be enough room to pull the rope.
    You are correct about running the carb out of fuel but plenty of the guys I worked with knew they would be shutting down the machine for lunch and just shut off the pony on the switch. The floats always leaked anyway so if you left the petcock open, you would soon smell the gas anyway and remember to shut it off.
    One thing missing in the start description is that there were two levers to move. One was to pull the pinion gear into the flywheel and the other was the clutch. When the diesel starts it kicks the pinion lever out of gear and then you can shut down the pony. I seem to remember the two speed as well but had never used low gear. You also had a few minutes of running the diesel before starting to move. All the oils were thirty weight so the machine was like a tired old dog waking up on a cold morning. You might run easy on everything until the oils warmed up because everything was slow. Most guys got to the machine half an hour early on Monday to get them started and warming up. If it was real cold you might start working the machine a half hour or more later.
    Direct electric was a huge deal. If there was another machine around we would just push start them.
     
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  10. Truck Shop

    Truck Shop Senior Member

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    Dec 8, 2015
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    Location:
    SE Washington St
    D8 14A

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  11. Snowbeast428

    Snowbeast428 Member

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    Apr 30, 2019
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    Location:
    New Hampshire
    Battery will be a thing for all vehicles so don't you worry about that.