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Amazing log trailer technology .

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by Iron Horse, Jul 7, 2009.

  1. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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  2. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    That is pretty sweet.:notworthy
     
  3. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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    There must be a lot of lurkers out there , it seems hard to get you guys to post comment on any subject to keep the forum ticking along . It's a great forum , how about giving the keys a bit of a tickle to give us something to chat about ?
     
  4. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Iron Horse

    I looked at this, and I wondered why you needed such a complex log trailer, instead of one you just pick up and set on the truck to go back empty? The unloader sets the trailer on when you get unloaded, and the loader puts it on the ground when you show up to get loaded.

    This is a pretty neat idea, but seems awfully complex for the rugged terrain of the logging industry. More moving parts in tough conditions makes it more likely to break.


    And I agree, some topics get little to no action.
    I am as guilty as any. I will look at a post, then just close it and move on unless it is something directly related to me.
     
  5. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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    These are folding road trains that can carry many bays and many tons of logs , they are not just a log trailer .
     

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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2009
  6. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    I am guilty too, Iron Horse, I read most of the posts and I do enjoy looking at the pics, but I usually only reply if I feel I can contribute to the particular thread or maybe have a little bit of fun occasionally and a lot of topics posted here, I have had no experience in, but that does not mean that I am not interested. You have had 233 views, so keep on posting, there are alot of people looking.

    Rn'R.
     
  7. dozerdave

    dozerdave Well-Known Member

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    I hear you 5X5 Iron Horse but I just don't have the tec. skills that many of you have on here to make a comment. I could rebuild the control valves and change the pumps on a G 1000 Gradall but that is about it.
     
  8. tootalltimmy

    tootalltimmy Senior Member

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    That last picture with the cabover has 12 axles. Wow! That is a lot of truck to stop and start especially in the bush. In B.C. I have pulled a super b-train which has 8 axles including the truck.
     
  9. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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    I didn't want to sound like i was having a sook about people not commenting on this particular thread . I was referring to all threads in general . Sometimes i can log on to HEF after a lapse of a few days and nothing much has changed . I think HEF deserves a little more effort from all of us , just my opinion .

    dozerdave , i would love to see some pictures of a disassembled Gradall valve or pump with a commentary , you do have valuable input for an interesting discussion on the forum .

    tootalltimmy , yes it is a large lorry , can you imagine trying to turn it around at the log dump if it did not stack on top of each other as it does .
     
  10. thejdman04

    thejdman04 Senior Member

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    Looks very neat, but as said wonder in the rough terrain etc how well they hold up
     
  11. ScottAR

    ScottAR Senior Member

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    I'm guessing there's quite a few Km between the mill and the forest? Seems like a
    lot of trouble for a short trip. Would be a sight to see cruising down the road. Alas,
    the DOT would be all over it in short order in the U.S. I'm not sure one could buy
    enough permits for it here in the states. The land of AUS seems to be a lot
    friendlier to the trucker...
     
  12. hvy 1ton

    hvy 1ton Senior Member

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    I think a lot has to do with the lack of railroads, but what do i know.
     
  13. dozerdave

    dozerdave Well-Known Member

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    Hi Iron Horse,

    I ran that G1000 years ago on a dam project. Sorry no books. The upstairs had 2 471 GM's and the carrier had a Waukesha [spelling?] about the size of a D2 Cat. The carb was huge and it burned gallons to the mile, not miles per gallon. I do remember Warner Swasey had to redesign the pumps [2 sets] because of a shoulder right at the spline. The new design was a straight shaft. The bearing that the upstairs sat on was huge and made in 2 pieces with roller bearings inside the 2 raises. That bearing was as beautiful as ite inside of a pocket watch. It had 2 swing motors and would swing easy on steep ground. It had tandum front axels and a super heavy duty carrier. The walking beam shaft was also a problem, probably from working of the side of the machine so much. We worked it in shot rock and steep ground where we would have a dozer push the rig into the work area. Our shop built a heavy front bumper like a push block to take the punishment from the dozer. Another thing, the left hand 471 ran counter clockwise and the right hand 471 ran clockwise. My oiler and I were really proud of it and the oiler waxed it once a week. They hired somebody's cousin and put it on 2 shifts and 1 night they were cleaning foundation in the spillway [22 % grade] and they let it get away. It crashed into a 3/4:1 rock slope and that was the end of waxing the G1000.
     
  14. Cretebaby

    Cretebaby Senior Member

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    Ever been to MI eh?
     
  15. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    I'm with R&R Iron Horse, I've been viewing this thread since you posted it. When I first saw the post, and the title, and that it was posted by you, I knew it would be about Aussie trucks, so I clicked on it. Trucks/trucking in OZ are something to look at. I/we may not have posted, but we've been viewing, we don't run nothin' like those trains here in the states. You guys down under know how to take an American make truck and make it off the chain crazy. I love it. ;)
     
  16. Hendrik

    Hendrik Senior Member

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    That's pretty neat but how will it stand up to a few years of rough roads? Although it would more than likely be used on pine plantations instead of virgin logging ops.
     
  17. Iron Horse

    Iron Horse Senior Member

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    As their website says , their trailers have been tested over millions of kilometres . The crash damaged ones I oversaw the repair of while i was in the industry never had any sign of fatigue cracks in them . It was always a case of tying the trailer down in the crush , jack the twist out of it and replace a couple of bolsters and then straight to the paint shop .

    This is another type they do to gain some payload .
     

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  18. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    That's some really nice engineering Iron Horse.
     
  19. JDOFMEMI

    JDOFMEMI Senior Member

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    Now that one I like, and it is a bit simpler too. Not quite as simple as our US trucks, but not quite the mass of moving parts of the first one in the thread.

    This looks a bit more rugged.
     
  20. dozerdave

    dozerdave Well-Known Member

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    Hi Iron Horse,

    That is a beautiful setup. I have never worked in the woods simply because none of the loggers would hire a 16 year old kid. Insurance problems. I landed a job that summer leveling land.