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Adding Ramps to a PJ Trailer?

Discussion in 'Trailers' started by Makers Acres, Sep 13, 2020.

  1. Makers Acres

    Makers Acres Member

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    I have a 2012 5 Ton 24' Flatbed Trailer by PJ. I really love the trailer, however the ramps on this unit seemed to be an afterthought. I know they make ones with nice ramps, but this one just doesn't have them. I bought it used from someone who drove it once and could not get it into his shop, so he sold it. The Ramps were so comically steep, the previous owner expanded each steel ramp by 4 feet making the ramps around 150-200 pounds each and they no longer fit into the onboard storage. I am tired of hurting myself dealing with these ramps!

    So my question is, does someone make a good aftermarket ramp conversion kit for this, or am I better of just building one from scratch, or just buying a new trailer?

    Thanks for the advice!
     
  2. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    Post a few pics and I know we'll have ideas. I've added ramps to a few trailers.
     
  3. Makers Acres

    Makers Acres Member

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    Thanks, see below:
     

    Attached Files:

  4. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

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    If it was mine, I'd add a beaver tail (sloped section) to the back of the trailer, and then hinge the ramps to the bottom of the beaver tail with some strong springs. You can get the springs from Redneck Trailer Supply for $14. It would probably take me about 2 days, and a few hundred in new material, though I am allergic to new material, and am friends with a scrap yard owner.
     
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  5. Makers Acres

    Makers Acres Member

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    Haha! Ok, thank you for the advice! Maybe this will make it on my projects list.
     
  6. Flat Thunder Channel

    Flat Thunder Channel Well-Known Member

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    Those do look like monster heavy units. Our old car trailer has similar ramps, but they are much shorter. The car trailer also has a beaver tail which helps with loading angles.

    Speaking of comical loading angles; I bought a brand new PJ gooseneck 24' tilt deck trailer in 2013. It has been really handy to have around for moving just about anything. However the incline is down right scary at times. I contemplated trading it in for a hydraulic beaver tail unit. Over the years I stopped and looked at a few trailers. I saw one trailer with hydraulic powered flip ramps. I think each style has a specific feature which makes it beneficial for different applications. I will probably keep mine around as I have grown accustom to how it operates. It was my first gooseneck and I have to say I'll never go back to bumper pull trailers. They pull so much better and it's easier on the truck.
     
  7. Old Doug

    Old Doug Senior Member

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    I would also go with a dovetail but its going to be long so i would cut the last so many feet and make it into a dovetail. It may make scents to trade. I got a tilt bed this spring no ramps i will never go back if i could go back in time i would do what ever it took to get one even if i had to sell a kidney. When i use a trailer i have to load and unload several time in a day.
     
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  8. Makers Acres

    Makers Acres Member

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    Ya, I am slowly coming around to that idea of needing a gooseneck / 5th wheel. They problem is that I use my truck 99% as a truck and I am constantly using the Bed. I don't want to have to take the adapter in and out every time I need to use the truck. I think that is why I have been dragging my feet for so long. I guess I have the long dream of getting myself a nice commercial rig someday so I can buy a 60-80 man lift which are around 40,000 pounds.
     
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  9. Flat Thunder Channel

    Flat Thunder Channel Well-Known Member

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    The nice part about a gooseneck trailer is you get the benefits of fifth wheel geometry without the the big bearing plate assembly. I purchased and installed a B&W turnover ball hitch in my truck. The simple pull of a lever in the fender well allows me to convert my gooseneck hauler into a regular truck bed. After installing it I honestly can say it will be one of the first add on items if I ever need to purchase a new truck. Hahaha new, but then again I don't want go in debt forever for an 80k truck. Lets see I can buy a second house or a new truck.

    If you get into those big weights I think a commercial outfit would be ideal too. Cheers,
     
  10. suladas

    suladas Senior Member

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    The only reason I went to bumper pull is I need to pull behind my dump truck, otherwise gooseneck is better in every way. You get a much longer deck compared to a bumper pull that will get around in the same areas. You can still use most of the box/deck area you just need to keep a small area clear for the coupler to get in and out. I really never bothered turning over the ball on my B&W unless I was hauling a pallet or something where I needed the bottom level. It's so small it doesn't get in the way for most stuff in the box.

    It would take a ton of time to cut the rear off that trailer and make a proper beavertail. I would say make the ramps flip up with a spring assist so they aren't really heavy to lift, make proper ramps around 7' long so they are still a reasonable weight to handle, or sell the trailer. You may find if you load enough times you just get use to them and are fine. My dad bought same type of trailer about 10 years ago with only 6' ramps, it took awhile to get use to loading skidsteer on that steep of ramps but eventually it's no big deal, went to 7' after the first set bent and it's even better.

    Unless the person welding those ramps together really knew what they were doing and you inspect the joint often, I think it's an accident waiting to happen.
     
  11. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    That little genie telehandler on your trailer is probably a load. If its a 5519, those little critters are close to 11,000lbs if I remember right. On a 5 ton trailer you're getting your $$$ worth.

    That said, if you want to continue to use this trailer and are loading and unloading a lot, the beavertail and ramps with springs like mitch504 suggested would be the way to go. You could shorten the ramps and it would make the "break over" point less.

    I have a trailer built like this on the rear, the middle raise section is kind of handy, and it can get you a little longer deck if you don't have to unload (like hauling lumber or barn tin etc.)

    [​IMG]

    I'd probably just build something like this and use your existing ramps. You're dovetail wouldn't even have to be that long.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    Notching the frame from the bottom and bending a dovetail in is not a big job. Just cut the correct size inverted V and leave the top beam flange to bend down until your notch closes up. Some heat on the top flange and the weight will gently let it settle into place. We did one on our old pintle hitch trailer in less than a day. After tacking we did lay it on its side with the log loader to make the weld up easy. We fish plated it to but I don't think it was needed. I tend to overbuild everything.
     
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  13. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    That’s quite a load for that trailer u have there. Unless there’s more tires under there I can’t see.