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500ton trucks...

Discussion in 'Other Earthmoving Equipment' started by MetalDragon_boy, Feb 1, 2007.

  1. Mass-X

    Mass-X Well-Known Member

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    When I get home home this weekend, I'll post additional pictures of the Bingham Canyon Mine. All my photos of that pit are on my PC.
     
  2. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Now that could have been interesting!
     
  3. Gavin84w

    Gavin84w Senior Member

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    Yep Mass X all left hand traffic down here, i like it that way with clockwise traffic out of the pit as it puts the loaded truck against the wall and not out on the edge to the next bench below.
     
  4. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    We run right hand drive since it is what all of the operators are used to outside of work. It allows us to run with standard traffic rules. If we have a pit that dictates the use of left hand drive, or a soft road where left hand drive allows the trucks to stay on the harder side, we simply set up signs and the drive changes to suit.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2009
  5. Mass-X

    Mass-X Well-Known Member

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    Bingham Canyon Mine, run by Rio Tinto’s Kennecott Utah Copper Corp. The haulage fleet consists of over 70 haul trucks; mostly CAT 793D’s and Komatsu 960E’s. Ten electric shovels, all P&H 4100’s and 2800’s. One hydraulic shovel, an O&K RH200. Eight blasthole drills. I don’t know the exact count, but 5-6 24H/M’s, 8-9 16H/M’s, a couple dozen D10R/T’s and D11R/T’s, and a host of 834’s and 854’s, including a new 854K. Daily production exceeds 450,000 tons. The pit is over 5000’ feet deep (1524m), and 2.5 miles (4km) wide.
     

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  6. Mass-X

    Mass-X Well-Known Member

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    Pictures of the crushing operation, showing how they can achieve those haul roads you could skateboard on. Pictures #2 and #3/#4 were taken 21 days apart of the exact same area of the pit as part of the West Pushback 1 Project. Shows what kind of production can be achieved by the army of haulers and shovels.
     

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  7. Mass-X

    Mass-X Well-Known Member

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    This picture shows an operation cleaning up the subsidence after a slope failure on the western side of the pit. A 385C with shovel cab cutting highwall/assist, two D10T's trapping to a 4100XP loading a 793D. A 24H on the floor.

    Lastly, a P&H 2800XPC under construction.
     

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  8. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    It's great to see what it looks like down there. Flew over the mine a week ago on the way south....damn clouds. Great pictures, thanks for posting, and feel free to post many more.

    How many 960Es do they have? Any idea how they're working out? We had a prototype running around at one of the mines up here. They had some pretty severe problems with it, even for a prototype. Mind you, it had the Siemens drive system, not the GE like the other 960E prototypes and pretty much every other Komatsu electric truck has.

    Do you know if they still have any 797s running around down there?
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2009
  9. CAT793

    CAT793 Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for Delivering on the Pictures!!!! Well Done.

    How does the economics work on such a huge Hole and 240T???

    Where do your "D" Trucks fall down?
    Steering/Fan Pumps?
    Head Joint Integrity?
    Acc. Drive Shafts?
    Trans. Slip Times?
     
  10. Gavin84w

    Gavin84w Senior Member

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    Thanks for the pictour Mass X. So let me see if i got this right, they have a dedicated crushing crew that manufacture material on site to sheet the roads?

    Brian, i think the 797,s went long ago from there and are in Indonesia now and as a side note Morenci,s 797,s did not work out either and the 3 of them ended up in your neck of the woods. I don,t really think there was a particular thing that ousted the trucks from either site, running costs possibly but Cat chose those sites for field follow as the sites have very good practices going on and would give an honest fingerprint during FF testing.
     
  11. amtronic

    amtronic Well-Known Member

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    So let me get this straight. The further down they dig, the larger the circumference has to be of the pit to stay below allowable grade on the haul road. So they must be constantly cutting out the roadway walls to enlarge the hole and provide new roadway. I wonder how long the haul road is to get out of the pit? Some astronomical number of miles?
     
  12. Ross

    Ross Senior Member

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    Epic pictures :notworthy

    The only Data they will get from the 95's is rolling figures, Looks like a very predictable mine site ..

    Mass-X: Just keep them pictures comming partner. I for one, Never get tired of viewing :cool:
     
  13. X51

    X51 New Member

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    The Siemens inverter for the 860 Komatsu is rated for and has hauled 450 tons. It is the smaller of the new generation inverters that Siemens is building.

    X51
     
  14. X51

    X51 New Member

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    Actually, I meant to add that the problem with the tires has to do with size. They can make bigger tires, but they have no way to transporting them to the site. They'd be huge.

    The new Siemens truck inverters were designed to pair with our newer shovel inverters so a truck could be filled in two scoops. I'm told no Siemens 860 inverters have gone to the U.S. or Canadian markets so I'm not sure where the 'problem' prototype unit was seen. I'm told one 960 went to Canada. That might be the one that had a pump leak, but rather than fixing it, the customer decided to let it keep on leaking. They added water instead of antifreeze so it froze up literally. You can't always go by half the story. The pumps have all been upgraded to stainless steel models.

    To me though, the coolest thing was when we built the first direct drive dragline for China. Seeing the pictures of the huge ring motor for that and knowing out cabinets power it... staggering.

    X51

    Orders have been strong, but transitioning away from the older GTO trucks has been slow because our customers still order the older generation trucks.
     
  15. tripper_174

    tripper_174 Well-Known Member

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    Can't believe that in Canada where we put antifreeze in our our veins as well as in our equipment that anybody would use water where it would freeze!
     
  16. alco

    alco Senior Member

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    Actually, they can definitely transport larger tires. The issue is not that they cannot transport them, it's that once you break a certain size, there is added cost in transporting them due to different routes being needed, more permitting, and so on.

    You might want to reread the post with the comment about the "problem prototype". It says right in the post that it was a 960 that was the issue, not an 860. The issues with the drive system were the typical Siemens issues of constant inverter faults, as well as blowing all of the drive motors that were built for the truck in a matter of two months. This was in the summer time, and there was no freezing issue. So you're right, you can't always go by half the story.
     
  17. X51

    X51 New Member

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    I'll chat with the guys who designed it and see what they say. Feedback is always important. It sounds like you saw the first one ever built. Field situations are sometimes very tough to recreate with a test fixture.

    And yes, the cost and logistics of getting the tires there is the drawback from what I'm told. I'm sure Siemens is prepared to make inverters for a 500 ton truck if the customers have a truck that is capable of hauling that capacity. Again, the smallest 860 inverter is rated for 450 tons.

    I would love to see these things actually doing what they do. I saw the first GTO prototype being built for a mining show, so I've seen the design and evolution of the various products since the beginning.

    It's hard to really imagine the amount of power these things are handling in such a compact design. When the trucks are fully loaded and braking on a downhill grade, they are releasing enough energy to power over 300 homes.

    If an assembler drops a loose piece of hardware into a cabinet, the electromagnetic field created from charging it up can propel the hardware out like a projectile. The heavy cables spasm like they are alive when power is switched on or off through them.
     
  18. Chris5500

    Chris5500 Well-Known Member

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    Back on the Bingham Canyon Mine topic, not sure if anyone has seen it, but there's a program on Discovery Channel called Belly of the Beast. This particular episode is about Komatsu trucks and it shows the Komatsu factory in Peoria where the trucks are made and theres a small scene on Bingham Canyon, they go on board a 4100 XPB and load a 960e. Pretty cool :drinkup
     
  19. activeorpassive

    activeorpassive Well-Known Member

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    It is impossible that you would have seen three trucks at the time of your post. It is impossible for you to see three field development trucks at minesites at the time of THIS post.

    Elko isn't scheduled to receive their truck until the end of this month; Wyoming will not see theirs until the end of May/early June.

    Bingham Canyon has the only truck in the field, and they will be getting another within days. Goldstrike and Black Thunder will get trucks soon, but I'm telling you...they don't have any to date.

    I'll post some pics of the trucks soon.
     
  20. Mass-X

    Mass-X Well-Known Member

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    I don’t know the number. I have a friend who works in the maintenance department at Bingham Canyon and from everything he’s told me, they’re top notch trucks. The only downside he passed along was that the operators say they’re less comfortable to operate compared to the 793D’s, but from a maintenance perspective he likes them. That’s all I know of them.

    The last one I saw there would have been in ’06 or ’07.

    Great topic, we could run a whole thread discussing that one. But all my time at Bingham Canyon has been from the contractor’s side or as a tourist. I can’t speak for their mine haulage economics. Since this thread has been hijacked a few dozen times, start a new post and we can discuss large pit/truck size economics there.

    I’m not the one to ask about that since I don’t work at Bingham Canyon. The only 793D’s I’ve been involved with directly was from the engineering/optimization standpoint and the relevant issues in that instance were actually related to suspension due to conditions (coal mine in northern climate) so I can’t add anything.

    Yes. That’s a pretty common practice at most all of the larger hard rock mines in the states. I figured that would be SOP in any of the larger operations like Kalgoorlie in Australia as well?

    I stand corrected. They would’ve been 240 tonners with Trinity bodies than because their profile made them stand out and look identical to the Tinaja/Bingham Canyon units.