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3D printed tool

Discussion in 'Tractor/Loader/Backhoes' started by DirtyHoe, Feb 15, 2020.

  1. DirtyHoe

    DirtyHoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
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    Location:
    Albany, Oregon
    I'm rebuilding the leaky loader control valve on my 580C. I got stuck removing the plastic gland nut and didn't want to butcher it up using the wrong hand tools(It's the machinist in me). So I was going to CNC mill a custom castle nut tool then decided that would take too long. I decided to see if a plastic printed 3D tool would hold up. It took me 15 minutes to draw it as a solid model after taking some basic measurements with a pair of dial calipers. The printer took about 80 minutes to print it. I was shocked at how strong the plastic is. Very accurate too. I had to hit the teeth with a couple of passes of the file to knock the crumbs off from the printing process. The gland was stuck pretty good and I did not shear any of the teeth off. Worked like a charm.

    Next, I'm going to rebuild the sloppy loader linkages that move the bucket and loader spools. After drilling and reaming the holes I will install IGUS polymer bearings and plug the grease zerks with a threaded plug. It will run dry forever with no maintenance.

    Anything I need to look out for on this rebuild that is not mentioned in the manual? I'm going to replace 100% of the soft parts.

    Steve
    Loader valve.jpg Loader valve 1.jpg Castle wrench.jpg
     
  2. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    On A Riverbank in IL. USA
    I have seen and read some very creative things on HEF.
    This has to be one of the best yet.
    Thanks for sharing it.
     
    Stan580D and DB2 like this.
  3. Joe Friday

    Joe Friday Active Member

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    Pleasantville IA
    What type of printer do you have? Cost of printer? Self taught or schooling?
     
  4. joe--h

    joe--h Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Utah
    This is an absolute first.

    Every single 3D printed thing that I've seen posted anywhere has been some useless thing that could have been purchased for less than the cost of the plastic to print it.

    Finally something useful !!

    Joe H
     
  5. DirtyHoe

    DirtyHoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Joe Friday,

    This was printed on a Mojo Stratasys system. It uses ABS plastic. New(not sure if it's still in production or not) is around $6,000 plus ongoing material costs. A friend printed it for me. I don't own one. The one I use at work is a Makerbot that does not have much for strength or reliability. So it's basically for prototyping and show and tell stuff. The 3D printer market changes by the day in terms of technology being invented. There is an aerospace company in my town that could print this in different steel alloys(laser and powdered metal). The machine was close to 1 million dollars.

    If you are interested in this technology I would use an online print service and pay as you go:
    https://www.3dhubs.com/3d-printing/#3dp-processes
    They print in most materials including steel and nylon. Some community colleges and universities provide printing services too.

    I'm a machinist(manual and CNC) and welder that went back to school to become a shop teacher over 20 years ago. I currently teach computer aided design(CAD), machining, and welding at a youth correctional facility. I also teach an evening welding class at a community college.

    This was drawn using Rhino CAD.
    https://www.rhino3d.com/

    I was formally taught AutoCAD back when it was first released around 1982. I've had lots of classes since then on many different platforms(Solidworks, ProE, SketchUp). If you are not afraid of computers you could teach yourself easily. To get started there are a lot of free CAD programs out there that have self-paced tutorials. Just like the HEF forum, there are many CAD user forums that are a wealth of knowledge. YouTube is great also.
    https://www.easyrender.com/3d-rendering/best-free-3d-modeling-software

    Steve
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2020
  6. John C.

    John C. Senior Member

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    Machinery & Equipment Appraiser
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    Northwest
    Thanks for awakening us to some actual possibilities of the technology. Also thanks for working with young people and possibly opening their eyes to another path in life.
     
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  7. Labparamour

    Labparamour Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Washington
    DH,
    Great use of technology.
    Dang you, you’ve added another item to my bucket list!
    At least you disclosed to $$ of printers so that’s out .
    But, so much is tied to CAD- CNC machines, plasma cutter tables, etc.

    Thanks for the link regarding software. Playing with that on dark, wet, winter nights might be interesting. (Old dog/new tricks kinda thing)

    And, like John said, it’s great that you’re able to pass your knowledge and skills on to the youth.

    Darryl
     
  8. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    On A Riverbank in IL. USA
    Could a 3D printer create this gear on this tachometer drive ? It was used on thousands of Case industrial and farm tractors. CNH now wants $474.00 for the complete drive.
    The used supply is diminishing every day.
    tach.png
     
  9. DirtyHoe

    DirtyHoe Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Albany, Oregon

    Darryl,

    The good news is you don't need to buy the equipment. You can send you solid model CAD file to an online printing service that I mentioned in post #5. That way you could try a variety of materials if you wanted to.

    Steve
     
  10. DirtyHoe

    DirtyHoe Well-Known Member

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    Tinkerer,

    The short answer is yes. Most printers are capable of +/- a few thousands of an inch. I checked my printed tool above it it was within .003 or less on every dimension. At school, I had a student make basic straight cut gears that worked in a "do nothing" gear train.

    How do they attach the Helical gear to the steel? Press fit? Did the old ones wear out?

    Most gears are still being manufactured on a gear hobbing machine. But now many live tooling CNC lathes can machine gears with special gear software.
    My only concern would be if it came apart in the engine how much damage would it cause? Since it's just a tach even if the gear was not perfect it would probably wear in against a steel camshaft? Not much torque spinning a tach cable.

    I would have to do some research to see if engine oil/heat would affect the plastic.
    It sounds like a possible class project...

    Steve
     
    Labparamour likes this.
  11. DirtyHoe

    DirtyHoe Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Albany, Oregon

    John,

    Thank you for your kind words.

    It's rewarding to see their successes. A few weeks ago we had an AWS weld certifier come into the facility for our weld test day. 16 students tested in dual shield MIG and 7018 stick on 3/8" or 1" plate. This is a butt joint groove weld with a backing strip. Most were in the flat 1G position(beginners) and some in the vertical up 3G. 15 out of 16 received their AWS weld certification card! We normally don't have that high of a pass rate.

    It's a tough crowd. With some of these guys, the only thing they have used a tool for was to commit a crime. The vast majority have had no experience making or fixing things.

    Steve
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2020
  12. Tinkerer

    Tinkerer Senior Member

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    That is a sacrificial fiber gear it wears out so no damage is to done to the camshaft that drives it. I guess that is why there is a shortage of new ones available.
    If I remember correctly it is pressed on the shaft.
    If not, it may be pined.
    The tachometer puts very little strain on the gear unless the cable gets dry from a lack of lubrication.

    I commend you on the outstanding success of so many students.
    It is a direct reflection on you ! Awesome !
    Keep up the good work.
     
  13. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
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    Well my thoughts on this would be if even one third of the "students" go on to use this knowledge in a productive way it's better than what they were doing in the past!
     
    Joe Friday and Labparamour like this.
  14. PAULTY

    PAULTY Member

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2019
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    Location:
    Sunman
    Just my 0.02c I have used ABS and PLA plastics in a oil filled drive shaft to replace a RPM gauge drive. This was a drive rod with a gear that just span and told the gauge the RPM. Still working to this day.
    I have table feed gears inside my horizontal mill that are 3d printer for the Automatic feed. That should be made of brass.

    Melting Temp was at 220.c but friction may come into play depending on the speed it's driven.

    Not sure inside an engine whether I would be 100% comfortable with it.

    I have printed MANY custom gears and many drives for odd ball lathes oner the years and never had any problems other than slight noice increase over the old gears.
    I would suggest printing as a solid not as 20% fill or similar, but I would think they would work.
    Fusion 360 makes a simple -ish job of designing / making helical gears.
     
  15. Ronsii

    Ronsii Senior Member

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    s/e Heavy equipment operator
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    I have seen some pretty impressive specs on a few of the nylon filaments, haven't used them myself but that's what I'd be leaning towards if it were me. :)
     
  16. Coy Lancaster

    Coy Lancaster Senior Member

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    Arkansas
    Case had a tool for that listed in the repair manual but only had four tangs on it. The tool you designed and made looks great.
     
    Tinkerer likes this.
  17. DirtyHoe

    DirtyHoe Well-Known Member

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    Coy,

    I saw that tool in the repair manual, but the part number didn't work in the Case parts store. So I figured it was obsolete, which gave me the idea to make my own. My thought was 4 tangs would probably break off so I went with 8 for the added strength.

    Steve
     
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  18. old and slow

    old and slow Active Member

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  19. old and slow

    old and slow Active Member

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    Good work