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What do I need to move a 32,000 lb telehandler?

Discussion in 'Equipment Moving Questions' started by thombstone, Aug 27, 2017.

  1. thombstone

    thombstone Member

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    Hey all,

    I have a JLG 1255 and it weighs 31500 pounds. I have a International roll back that I move my other equipment and trailers around with now, however I know this is way over its rating. I am thinking a larger tandem axle roll back? Any input is appreciated

    Thombstome
     
  2. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    My local rental house won't deliver a 10 k on their tandem rollback, they are overweight on the axles (they say). They use their semi tractor and trailer. Missouri is strict about axle weights though- your state may be better.
     
  3. thombstone

    thombstone Member

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    Thanks for the info, when I rented these in the past they always are delivered on a low boy or a loadall. I am in new york BTW.

    Thombstone
     
  4. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    You will be hard pressed to find a light enough straight truck to legally haul your JLG. It would have to have a heavy front axle, long enough to get enough weight forward and it would still have to be light enough to make weight. Sounds like a tractor trailer move to me.
     
  5. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Also, I did pass someone hauling one, about a year ago, on the side of the road with a blown out tire. Looked like a steel erection outfit, had a 12k telehandler, two big blue millers, and two big job boxes, loaded on a 30' tandem gooseneck, behind a dodge 1 ton.

    Wouldn't be my choice to haul it, but some people figure if it will fit on the trailer, they can haul it. I wouldn't want to try to stop in a hurry, that's for sure.
     
  6. thombstone

    thombstone Member

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    I own a 2015 F350 dually and did not even consider it as an option, I own a f550 rack body and that did not even make the maybe list either. So any input on a tractor/trailer?
     
  7. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    I would look at what the rental houses use- tilt/drop tail single drop tandems. They usually rotate their fleets quite frequently, but their trailers get used hard. Lots of loading and unloading cycles, rough in town use. Short wheel base truck and as short of trailer as you can (40-45'), crowded streets are no fun with a 53' double drop.

    There are a couple of guys on here with some fancy dropped, stretched trucks with sleepers. Chrome bumpers 1" off the ground. I can appreciate the time they've put into them, I just don't think they serve a useful purpose in the construction game. I sure wouldn't want to make downtown deliveries with one. I have a hard enough time with short wheelbase daycabs in my area, those dropped bumpers would be ripped off in a heartbeat in my use, and I prefer the visibility of a daycab.

    I own a sliding axle tilt deck trailer that I got from a asphalt paving company for moving my straight mast forklifts, I also use it when I rent a telehandler. The axles slide ahead and the whole bed tilts, makes it have a nice low loading angle. The only downside is if the parking brake of what you're loading doesn't hold well, you better have someone with you to tilt the trailer back flat, or you have to winch it on the trailer (which is also a two man job). I would take into consideration your current/ future equipment plans when picking out a trailer. You could get by with a single drop lowboy with just ramps and load a telehandler, but if you've got manlifts or similar things to haul, it wouldn't be as handy.

    I pull my sliding axle trailer with a tandem international, cummins, m11 (330 hp), 10 speed. I have a western star tandem, detroit 60 series (500hp), 13 speed, that I pull a double drop triple axle (50 ton trailer), and its a much better tractor than the international. The M11 is fine up to about 70,000 gross, 80,000 in flat country. The cab and construction is just much better on the western star, in addition to the more hp. Mine are both 90's versions.

    Peterbilt, Kenworth, western star, are kind of top of the line over the road trucks, that also make day cab versions. Should be lots of macks out east by you, they used to dominate the construction/ day use category. I would tend to put macks and the older ford 9000, in the day use, less fancy, but tough trucks category (I own one of each). Not a big fan of freightliners, international, or volvo. Cat (3406), cummins (big cam/ n-14), or detroit 60 (12.7) series engine (they're all good motors) mack would most likely be mack engine (not always, but they're not bad motors in mid 90's), 9 or 13/15 speed, 3.90 to 4.88 rear ratios. I prefer older over newer, pre 2003 gets you earlier than most emissions problem motors. Plus if you need interstate authority, pre 2000 doesn't need the new electronic logs.

    In my area $15,000-20,000 will buy you a decent mid 90's to early 2000s, daycab. It will take about that same amount to buy a decent trailer. Neither would be perfect at that price, both needing a little work (deck boards or brakes on a trailer, tires, lights, maybe a clutch or trans maybe injector on a truck), but usable with a little work.

    I'm not a big fan of my tall chrome stacks on my western star, I'm just too cheap to change them out (were on it when I bought it). The international will turn shorter (less wheelbase), but it shakes and rattles a lot more going down the road. They are both air ride.

    The second picture shows my tilt trailer a little better, it pivots right at the drop, the axles slide ahead and there's a little back ramp that is hydraulic. It's a trail-eze, landoll makes something real similar. They are heavier and more complicated (more $) than a rear tilt ramp, which is why most rental outfits don't use them. Once in a while the sliding axles is really nice getting around a tight corner.

    20170824_110919.jpg
    20161121_101002.jpg
     
  8. thombstone

    thombstone Member

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    Great info Crane operator.
     
  9. DMiller

    DMiller Senior Member

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    Who got the new generator??
    Good info on the trailers, have had my share of trying to work on overloaded almost scary set ups the owner thought was quite OK. I have dragged my own share have to admit, with one of those I can still get that on as not TOO heavy attitudes. My worst event was a 180 Allis farm tractor, with loader, my Thermalarc engine powered welder, a 9' drag blade sitting on top of a 3008 Bush Hog then to the NOSE of the gooseneck my 520 Massey 14' disc backed on with the rear gang sitting ON the neck. Single wheel 24' 13,500 rate tandem gooseneck behind my 1999 Ford F250SD 7.3. Dragged that 74 miles on MO 2 lane.
    I ended up replacing all four tires within the next month, I think they got a little warm.
     
  10. Metalman 55

    Metalman 55 Senior Member

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    We are renting a 1255 JLG Telehandler right now for a project & used our lowboy to move it to the jobsite. Our JLG 800AJ man lift (in pic) weighs in about the same as the 1255.
     

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  11. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Sorry DMiller, I missed that question. It went in at a new building at Big Cedar Lodge. That's a large resort on Table Rock Lake, the owner of basspro and cabela's owns it, and is always building things down there (really gorgeous buildings and area).

    The over the road truck driver that delivered it, I met him at the truck stop and he said "I can get in anywhere." I knew he couldn't get to where the generator went, with his big long pete and a double drop, and he couldn't . We transfered the generator to my trailer, and pulled the truck and trailer up the hill with a forklift, I didn't have enough weight on the drives, and I needed the generator that far back on the trailer, to lift it and set it in place. (I think it was 36,000lbs or so).

    Most of the over the road guys get a deer in the headlights look when you start talking about hooking on with a excavator and dragging them into a jobsite. Those big chrome bumpers and low riding rigs don't work real well, where we usually need to go. if you look at the picture real well, you can see the buildings roof lines and the crane in the back ground, if you tilt your computer monitor until they are level, that would give you a better idea of the slope right there, the camera was tilted to the truck. :)

    Your trailer looks like its holding up well metalman55. I've always wondered, what's the "D" stand for on the rear of your trailers? Ours say "oversize", for permited loads. "Dimension"?
     
    DMiller likes this.
  12. Dustin Dirt

    Dustin Dirt Member

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    Just Send It!