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Using soft slings, what are your your thoughts?

Discussion in 'Safety Issues' started by RocksnRoses, Jul 17, 2010.

  1. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    I am not a crane operator, but we use wheel loaders for lifting anything that needs lifting and do use a soft sling occasionally, but mostly chains.

    There was an accident in Adelaide yesterday, where a steel beam slipped from a soft sling, killing one worker and injuring another.

    What do other members of the forum think about using soft slings in this particular situation?

    http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/man-d...salination-plant/story-e6frea6u-1225892813584

    RnR.
     
  2. willie59

    willie59 Super Moderator

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    Bummer to hear another hand lost his life at work RnR. :(

    I don't have a problem using nylon belt slings, but...only in the proper application. Lifting beams? Nope. Suitable wire rope chokers at the least, preferrably a beam grab. Problem with this incident, we don't know exactly what happened. It could have been belt slings that were weak from cuts and failed, it could have slipped on the beam and the steel edge cut the belt, or could have been not heavy enough for the load. That's the thing about lifting anything with a crane, it requires proper rigging and safe rigging. Otherwise, bad things happen.
     
  3. Lee-online

    Lee-online Senior Member

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    Ditto.

    We use slings most of the time. Our slings are rated and have capacities tags on them. If the tag is illegible, frayed or just plane old and tatty they get cut up and replaced. Sling have their place and need to be used correctly just like wire slings and chains.
     
  4. RocksnRoses

    RocksnRoses Senior Member

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    It is a bummer, Atco, the repercussions will effect all of us in the long term, not only the trauma for the families affected, but there will be more rules and regulations placed on everyone involved in any industry, because accidents are still happening.
    You are right, the article does not state exactly what happened, only that the sling slipped and that could have been caused by a number of things.

    RnR.
     
  5. aongheas.macask

    aongheas.macask Well-Known Member

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    I agree atcoequip, absolutely nothing wrong with "soft slings" if properly used.
    however, an experienced slinger/ banksman should check the sling condition and load rating before use, as you stated "proper and safe rigging".
     
  6. Tiny

    Tiny Senior Member

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    We use the them.......A lot..... but there are certain places and situations that they flatly don't fit.

    We have been working for one heavy contractor that has outlawed nylon slings of any sort. Their reason is...Nobody wants to take the heat for taking stuff out of service.So they use stuff way past the safety limits or out of service specs.

    I threw a set of straps out a couple of years ago and found them a week later in the back of a pickup out on one of the jobs.Found the foreman and he told me he thought they were perfect to use in a spot where they might be cut by something that way he wouldn't hurt the good ones. .... from that point on,if a set is no good I cut one eye.

    I did have a discussion with him.
     
  7. bill onthehill

    bill onthehill Senior Member

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    I used slings for years to lift a lot of heavy stuff.(80,000 lbs.) They need daily inspection and pre use inspection by the rigger every time. Proper pads to protect them from cuts are also essential. If the tag cant be read or they show any damage at all they got run across the saw and discarded. There were NO exceptions to these rules. When folks hurry or use damaged equipment it is asking for a tragedy to happen.
     
  8. Tanstaafl

    Tanstaafl Active Member

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    We use nylon slings of all types and shapes (flat, round, endless, eye-eye, twinpath, you name it we've probably got it somewhere on this job) on the job I'm on and the one thing we constantly beat into people heads is that you've got to inspect them every time you use them and take care of them constantly. They are great to use in the right situation. We are picking some heavy box girders (40,000-95,000 lbs) and the twinpaths are great for it because they are relatively easy to rig with and they don't mess up the paint horribly. However you've got to constantly check the condition, use the correct softeners on anything that looks remotely like an edge, and take care of them. As soon as they cut the piece loose and bring the rigging back down our guys coil them back up and put them in the box even if they are going to need them that afternoon. Our project manager will sign any request for rigging if you tell him you've got something bad. He will also tear you a new one if you've got bad rigging anywhere near your operation. We caught a bad sling and swapped it out. Left the bad one of the ground next to the crane and got a stern talking to for not destroying it the moment we found out it was bad.

    That said you need to use the right rigging in the correct situation. We use steel chokers to move stuff around just as much as we do our nylons. It's shame that someone got killed and hurt most likely because someone was in a hurry or didn't check the rigging.
     
  9. Dozerboy

    Dozerboy Senior Member

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    I think they are great at a company that really pushes safety and inspections. Like Tiny said some contractors can't be trusted to use them properly.
     
  10. wildhorse trnr

    wildhorse trnr Well-Known Member

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    I prefer to use nylon slings whenever possible. I have seen 2 bad accidents from faulty lift chains, these were tagged and inspected. But as with all things in our industry you have to use the correct tool for the job. I have had riggers use wire rope slings on heavy items (steam turbines units), I have not had alot of experience with using them first hand though.
     
  11. johnpieter

    johnpieter Member

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    You should follow the safety working load limit as well as instructions. Make sure you are using quality certified products.

    Thanks!
     
  12. Bls repair

    Bls repair Well-Known Member

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    Knowing how to rig is just as important as what you rig with . I have refused to pick many loads because I didn't like how it was rigged.
     
  13. Kiwi-truckwit

    Kiwi-truckwit Well-Known Member

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    Same here, I use synthetic slings for damn near every steel lift, but you do need to be particularly aware of sharp edges. Old conveyer belt or tyre tube works wonders in these situations.
    A lot of people also forget that once you choke your rigging (no matter the construction) you lose 30% of your rated capacity immediately. If the gear is a little bit degraded already, that can be catastrophic.
    I wouldn't have an issue with putting synthetic slings on a wheel loader, just remember though that lifting with this kind of equipment can also shock load the rigging, especially on uneven ground, so always make sure you have a higher capacity than you need, and keep your rigging clean and in good condition.
     
  14. Bls repair

    Bls repair Well-Known Member

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    X-2^^^^^
     
  15. icestationzebra

    icestationzebra Senior Member

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    I worked in a shop where they were lifting a heavy part with a brand new sling and it slid on a painted 6"x8" rectangular tube that was wet from snow. Even though the corners have something like a 1/2" radius the sling looked like it was cut with a knife! :eek: Slings have their place and are very handy, but I get real nervous when failure the consequences of failure are high.

    We also had issues with guys from other departments stealing our decommissioned slings out of the trash, so now I always cut them in half with a hack saw. ISZ
     
  16. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Liftin & draggin ?

    Chain is the toughest by far for rough work around sharp corners . Would not use anything else behind the Holmes 750 sling .
    http://www.heavytruckforums.com/showthread.php?263-Some-Holmes-750-action&p=2580&viewfull=1#post2580

    Wire rope / cable chocker's come in second . Much lighter than chain and easier to handle . Still pretty tough resisting abrasion .

    http://www.heavytruckforums.com/showthread.php?263-Some-Holmes-750-action&p=2549&viewfull=1#post2549

    Nylon slings are very light & easy to rig . Good lifting capacity but will not handle any kind of sharp edges or abrasion .

    We use all 3 given the task at hand and picking the one that will work best for the job .
     
  17. Bls repair

    Bls repair Well-Known Member

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    Chains should be certified for lifting and have certification tag on it per OSHA.
     
  18. Kiwi-truckwit

    Kiwi-truckwit Well-Known Member

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    All lifting equipment should be certified for lifting!
     
    johnpieter likes this.
  19. len.mccluskey

    len.mccluskey New Member

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    I for one didn't have problems in using soft slings. The best advice I could give you would be to use only quality and certified products. Maybe this happened because of the poor equipment. I would also advise you to follow all the safety guidelines and work instructions.