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Pulpwood Logging Equipment-Old School Style

Discussion in 'Old Iron!' started by JAK5, May 21, 2009.

  1. JAK5

    JAK5 Active Member

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    Michigan
    Here's a few pictures of old school pulpwood logging, Its a John Deere 350 dozer with a Gafner log loader!
     

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  2. King of Obsolete

    King of Obsolete Senior Member

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    KINGDOM lynn lake manitoba
    looks good, thansk for sharing. any more pictures????

    thansk
    KoO
    Published Author
     
  3. JAK5

    JAK5 Active Member

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    I found a few more pictures. There are of a couple of early cut-to-length tree processors. Possibly some of the first ever built. They were built by my Father in Upper Michigan in the early 60's. He's the one on the old Chevy truck with the Ramey loader on it, restored the truck for a friend.

    Definitely a simpler time to work in the woods! Back then everyone was trying to come out with the better mouse trap....
     

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  4. King of Obsolete

    King of Obsolete Senior Member

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    very good invention they were making back then. nice chevy with the sun visor and all.

    thansk
    KoO
    Published Author
     
  5. Taylortractornu

    Taylortractornu Charter Member

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    Occupation:
    Privvate landfill operator/manager
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    In the second set of pictures the 2nd and 3rd have some things of special interest to me Is that log loader buit onto that trailer Is it a cut off type bench. Or is the loader a seperate unit. Ans is that prehauler/forwarder a Gafner Iron Mule. Also what type of skidder is that in the 3rd picture. I found an old prehauler not too far from where I work I think its an Iron mule but the loader looks alot smaller and made from pipe. It has a dump bed for Pulp. Im wanting to go into small logging, not really logging but on some jobs I get to take off some nice timber to take to a saw mill. Plus to use around my hobby farm. I was also thinking of building a pulp loading trailer for my firewood peration.
    Thanks for posting those great pics, I was a kid when the last of the stic wood was going out but still see alot of the old pulp trucks with the car axle winch loaders still around.
     
  6. JAK5

    JAK5 Active Member

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    Well I can't figure out what happen to my post. I replied to you earlier this week with more pictures... Oh well I'll try again!:Banghead

    That harvester shown in the pictures was built by my Father in the 60's. He first built the rubber tired harvester shown in the pictures out of a Gafner Iron Mule and a backhoe, but when he discovered it was to slow and wouldn't hold up he built the tree length version. He also built the cable skidder shown in the pictures. Because the early Iron Mule were proned to breaking transmisssion housings he lifted the engine up and over the axle and built a frame underneath it. Because the nose stuck out infront so far on early Iron Mules it was easy to run them up on a stump or brush pile causing them to break. But because they basically were made out of Ford and Massey Ferguson tractors, parts were fairly easy to come by. My Father & Emil Gafner knew each other pretty well and collaborated on a few things. Some of my Dads early creations were predecessors to todays cut-to -ength equipment, maybe he was just to far ahead of his time... The 60's and 70's were definitely an exciting time for logging equipment. Everyone and there brother (literally) were coming out with what they thought was a better mouse trap. The biggest difference between today and back then is, back then a logger could make a buck in the bush and equipment was affordable, todays it is a complete opposite. I've got to warn you, once logging gets into your blood, it is near impossible to get it out!!
    Send pix of the machine you found, I'd like to see it! I can get you in touch with people for parts for the Iron Mules if you ever need them...
    The Iron Mules are definitely handy rigs to have around.
     

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  7. Taylortractornu

    Taylortractornu Charter Member

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    Thanks for the explanation. I really like the skidder. I think alot of the small guys around here would like something like that. Ive been getting alot of free logs from cut overs that were missed by the skidder ot buried in brush on the landing or some that were left becuae they were shy of a full load. Plus I sell firewood on the side.
    Your right logging gets into your blood. I never was around it much just a few times when we had land cut before clearing. I have a friend thats an old man now that built a few hundred pulp loaders and side loaders in his day. I saw a pulp trailer he built for a man that had a new pickup that he didnt want in the woods. He took the rear half of a 53 GMC 1 1/2 ton and put a set of stick wood standards on it and a swinging pulp winch. He then pulled the front of the frame together to make a toungue and made some arches over the wheels. he left in the transmissin and pto on the frame. The man had a 2000 Ford tractor that he worked with and that ran the pto for the pulp hoist/ winch. He could get I think a cord on the trailer and when it was muddy he would pull the truck frames transmission in gear and use it to help push theload out of the woods. Then when he got to the road he would un hitch the tractor and hook to the truck and got to the log yard. Just about every one here pulp wooded. Dad said when he was a boy willow was in demand. He said you peeled it in the woods and had to let it dry because when you cabled it down it would slide out. Thanks for the pics and the explanations. Are you familiar with any of the old Log Hog equipment.
     
  8. don1nie

    don1nie New Member

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    Location:
    Merrill, WI
    Need Model number for this loader

    Hey, do you have the model number for this loader. I broke my main pivot and need to find a used one.

    Thanks for any help you can give me in repairing my machine, (links?).

    Don Wendorf
     
  9. maddog

    maddog Senior Member

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    thanks for the pictures
     
  10. ANTHONY ROAD

    ANTHONY ROAD Member

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    Cool pics
     
  11. JAK5

    JAK5 Active Member

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  12. JAK5

    JAK5 Active Member

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    Give Bob a call at (906)356-6303.. He can probably get you one or make you one.
     
  13. MutsMachines

    MutsMachines Well-Known Member

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    northern ontario
    Those are really good old pictures. Always like to see what started it all in the bush and the old hard to find rare type machines.