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Making trails steep terrain 300 acres brush & trees

Discussion in 'Forestry Operations' started by jimbabwe, Feb 14, 2016.

  1. Hobbytime

    Hobbytime Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    usa
    The power company had a machine like yours, but BIGGER..this thing ate anything in its way and left small chips behind it, im sure it cost several hundred thousand to buy...I cut lots of trails through the woods with my d58 and dressed them with a 75 horse new holland tractor with a box blade....this year I picked up a john deere 355d track loader with a 4 way blade and once the woods dry out enough ill see what trails can be made with that...the trails I made with the d58 were 10 ft wide, as that was the blade size, and as the years go the trails get smaller in width, I would go at least 6 or 8 ft wide the first time through..
     
  2. old-iron-habit

    old-iron-habit Senior Member

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    When I seen he tail of the truck then it all came back to me. The cool custom bed.
     
  3. treemuncher

    treemuncher Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2006
    Messages:
    91
    Occupation:
    eatin' trees, poopin' chips
    Location:
    West TN
    I've been out working a few steep jobs lately. Here are some pics of the new-to-me machine doing its thing. I still need to take some trail pictures.
    DJI_0085a.JPG
    Above: finish quality work
    Below: rough in on same job above
    nygren 1d.jpg

    Another overlook in the same subdivision but a wee bit steeper.

    mathis after 2.JPG mathis after 4.JPG
     
    check and mikebramel like this.
  4. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    Florida,Ga,Tn
    That's some steep chit wow
     
  5. Graham1

    Graham1 Well-Known Member

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    Hampshire, UK
    Isn't clearing all the vegitation off slopes that steep going to lead to massive erosion when it rains hard?
    Graham
     
  6. southernman13

    southernman13 Senior Member

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    I think it's just knocking it down. That's usually why you would use a muclher rather than up root it. It should grow back without soil disturbance
     
  7. Bumpsteer

    Bumpsteer Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Mechanical designer
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    mid Michigan
    That there is the drunk trap from hell!

    Ed
     
  8. treemuncher

    treemuncher Well-Known Member

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    eatin' trees, poopin' chips
    Location:
    West TN
    Absolutely NOT. The stumps remain in the ground and the mulch is cast directly on the ground. The root base of any grasses remain and they pop back up within days and lock the mulch in place. The mulch helps retain moisture for the grasses and locks them in tighter than before. It is nothing more than a win-win situation.

    I am currently working on my 20th year of mulching services. I've worked flatter and steeper jobs than these pictured and never had erosion issues from my work. And regarding the rains, I worked that job below the log house while it was raining that day. I only slid one time after we got close to 1/2" of rain that day.