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Looking for some advice on demo job.

Discussion in 'Demolition' started by Martinex, Mar 7, 2017.

  1. Martinex

    Martinex New Member

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    looking for some advice on a 30x50 two story house. Block foundation with a 8x20 attached porch with roof. I'm needing help figuring my tons. Will be hauling in tandem dump trucks. 16' boxes. Be my first house demo. 2x8 floor Joice 2x4 frame, paneling on the wall. House is empty besides cabinets and carpet. Any advice I would sure appreciate! Thanks in advance.
     
  2. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    About to board a plan to Vegas. I'll get back to you
     
  3. Martinex

    Martinex New Member

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    Okay. Also has two chimneys I forgot to mention.
     
  4. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Here is the formula I use for residential demo. It's not a hard, set in stone formula as I've changed and added to it over the years.

    1,000 SF = 100 CY
    We average 9 tons in a 30 CY roll off. Some boxes are heavier towards the end and the ones on the front end are lighter but the average is 9 tons.

    That should get you headed in the right direction.

    Any pics of the house?

    Sorry about not getting back, it's been a busy week at Conexpo.
     
  5. farmerlund

    farmerlund Well-Known Member

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    I Use trucks, 16ft and a 18ft. 28-30 loads X 3.5 tons/load. Looks like CM and I are close. I don't really have a formula Just a guess. I do around 4-5 houses a year around that size. Mine are usually full of junk, like 6 washers and dryers, and 4 hot water heaters in the basement. LOL
     
  6. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Typed my comment above in haste in an airport on the way home from Conex.

    A little more info.

    My base formula is 1,000SF = 100CY. However there is also a factor that can be plugged in to adjust the debris number up (never down) if the structure has personal contents or irregular construction or materials. IE - Rock facade, cedar siding, large windows, etc. I once got burned on personal contents many years ago - lost money on the job. Since then I will never bid a house demo I can't walk through every room to look.

    With that I'll mention that the above formula DOES NOT include any foundation debris - just the structure itself. Any foundations - slabs, footings and basements need to be taken off separately.

    Since you are hauling in your own trucks are you required to take the inert debris to a landfill or can you legally dump it elsewhere? Here the clean inert can be used as beneficial fill which cuts the weight of the debris down. I have two dumps on either end of the city for that reason.

    Couple of other items to mention:

    Permitting - if any who's responsible
    Utilities - Who is responsible for disconnecting. This can get expensive with sewer - here a licensed plumber has to cap the line.
    Erosion control - if required do you have to have plans, permits, inspections in addition to the cost?
    Environmental - Asbestos survey required? If so who is responsible for getting it done and paying for it?
     
  7. Martinex

    Martinex New Member

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    Thanks for the information guys. Been a while since I got on here. I put a bid in and have not heard back from the guy yet. So we will see how I did if it comes down to it.
     
  8. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

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    Here the property owner needs permission because the city will be losing tax dollars. The contractor needs a permit to do the work. The city will turn off the water for free, hydro wants 50 bucks to disconnect the power so does phone company. All significant size metal items must be recycled. Asphalt shingles must go to landfill, and weigh slips provided to planning commission for proof. Most of the wood products can go to our own fill site as long as we can pick out most of the tarpaper, or linoleum flooring. I find the really old houses are a lot harder to knock down than the newer ones
     
  9. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Cuttin Edge - Is your fill site for the wood debris a certified landfill or is wood debris non-regulated?

    We recycled the steel if there is enough of it, usually a normal home will yield a 30 yard of shred scrap which depending on scrap prices can be a little money maker or just knock one roll-off of debris we have to pay to dispose of.

    Concrete, green waste, unpainted block/brick, uncontaminated soil, rock and cured asphalt are not regulated and can be used as beneficial fill. Luckily I have two sites for this type of debris disposal but we can't dispose of wood that is not in a vegetative state - IE no dimensional lumber. Dimensional lumber wood waste has to go to a C&D or MSW landfill.

    I have found the older houses are not that much harder to knock down but the old lumber is harder to densify in cans for disposal which increases disposal fees.
     
  10. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

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    The dump site had to be approved by the environment, as per the well field protection act. It is not approved for any oil based materials, but get this...We don't recycle asphalt around here unless it is cold milled, and even then it is only used for shouldering material. We can dump asphalt in the dump site, but not shingles.
     
  11. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

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    Thanks for the info cuttin edge. Here it takes an act of Congress and some grease to get a landfill approved, be it a C&D or heaven forbid a MSW. Politics and a lot of money come into play in the approval process.:cool:

    Our local highway departments on mill and re-pave projects require the contractor to submit tonnage tickets for all the milled asphalt in order to get a credit back on the RAP.
     
  12. cuttin edge

    cuttin edge Senior Member

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    Here on municipal, or provincial jobs, the rap belongs to them. They pay for the milling, trucking and screening as per item in the bid. Then they pay for the loading trucking, lay down, grading sweeping and compacting as another item.
    The waste company that owns the C&D site pays us to look after the site. We maintain the road, tramp and cover the materials. The site is not far from our asphalt plant, so they use our scales, and we take the payments. It took 5 years to have the site approved, and it is subject to government inspections. Our dump site was a one time approval thing, and it has not been looked at since.
    I find the 60 year old plus homes, especially those with planking on the inside, and outside of the walls are well built, and take more effort to knock down. Some brick chimneys come down in one piece, and need a bit more persuasion to come apart, and that's using a 350 Deere