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Just some work pics

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by crane operator, Aug 20, 2016.

  1. BobCatBob

    BobCatBob Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    253
    Location:
    Chicago
    Very smart Crane Op....the tricks you guys use for safety, ways out if things go kiddywampgus....

    I rebuilt my crane for fun, but the inspiration was my grandfather (owner/operator of a Grove 18 ton, local 150). He always used safety 1st, paycheck 2nd while working. I give you guts a ton of credit.....every time I see your picks, I think "what if something goes wrong?". Having an out is what keeps you safe.

    My grandfather used to say "common sense isn't learned.....and those who don't have it, you need to identify in this line of work....so they don't kill you".
     
  2. 95zIV

    95zIV Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    RR Track Test Truck Mobile Maintainer
    Location:
    Cincinnati, OH
    They'll slip, I was setting a tank behind a brand new house, didn't even have the siding on yet, got stretched out directly off the back of my truck with the knuckle boom about 30' and the tank hit the ground, the beam and boom jumped up(same style beam that's in your picture Tradesman, the back to back "C" channel with the cables pinned in the center) and the beam went right through the sheathing on the back of the house. All I could think was "there goes my job", the builder was also the owner, said "don't worry about it, i've got extra plywood, I'll just change it out", thank god!
     
  3. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Location:
    sw missouri
    Had to unload the rest of a new amusement ride yesterday- I know, I don't like sunday work either, but the truckers wanted to get rolling, so I went along with the flow...

    Tower sections were under 12,000, the motor section had all the weight out beyond the beams, it had a really goofy center of gravity- and why would they bother to put pick points or eyes on it? We still had a chain comealong in the truck from the amusement ride we tore down, so I added a extra leg to level it out.

    Tower ends up being 200' tall. A 210 ton is scheduled for next monday to stand it up.

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  4. hosspuller

    hosspuller Well-Known Member

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    Aug 28, 2014
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    Location:
    North Carolina
    Crane Op... If you're speaking about the eyes & lift points on the BLUE part... I fear you give the engineers too much credit for thinking of you. Looks to me they're just extra mounting spots. Mount the gear box input shaft horizontal or vertical. The arm seems to be a reaction arm to counter the torque of the gearcase.
    What kind of ride is it ?
     
  5. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Location:
    sw missouri
    I was hoping for welded on pick points on the whole assembly so it would be balanced for installation- it's going 200' up and the guys mounting it will be hanging on the poles up there. It wouldn't have been hard while they are making it. I have guys all the time want to pick by the eye bolts in the motor- those are just for lifting the motor, not the whole assembly, and I'd hate to damage the gearcase- I think it came from germany (with a +/- 6 week lead time). We simply rigged all the iron and adjusted until we had it close. :D. I give engineers very little credit- only when somethings really neat.

    It's some kind of tower/ drop/ air shoot them up and down thing. Something I feel no need to ride anymore.
     
  6. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Location:
    sw missouri
    Should I be worried if I show up on a jobsite, and one of the workers points at me, looks at the new guy and says "he's crazy". I've done a lot of oddball stuff for them, but I never really thought crazy was involved:rolleyes:.

    This job went good, its a good quarry outfit, I offloaded the jaw a while back. they got the frame in.
    Tandem picking a crusher frame with a end loader, they had dropped it a little far from where I needed to set to put the jaw in. Rather than set the crane up twice and skip it along, I decided it would be easier to just let him take 1/2 with the loader. Then we put in the jaw.
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  7. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Location:
    sw missouri
    Little bit up in the air with a 25- and then later through a tree. The tree location is very concerned that they have no tree damage, but they are constantly changing stuff and we have to go through the trees to get there.

    Also a neat old trailer- no other options with it but to side load? and a truss job for later next week.


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  8. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    From today with my 35 ton. The steel beams go on the backside of the house making the deck. They tried to set them with a telehandler from the back side, but it was too steep to work. I set up on the front side and set them in the blind. I brought along one of my guys to run the radio, we were probably 10' at the most and some places 4' off the house- that had the windows already installed. I was around 90' from the far one. Had 45' post and the house was probably 35' tall on the ridge on the top side.

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  9. kshansen

    kshansen Senior Member

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    Occupation:
    Retired Mechanic in Stone Quarry
    Location:
    Central New York, USA
    Those jaw crusher pictures made me feel like I was back at work, spent 45 years playing around in the quarry up the road form me! First job was actually helping to assemble parts of the plant. And more than once helped move crushers with two front end loaders, one going forwards and the other one driving backwards. One of those jobs you sometimes don't want the wrong boss to be trying to "help" direct. We often said that with all the dangerous things there are in a stone quarry the most dangerous was a boss "helping"! I think if you do some research on accidents in quarries there is a high percentage that are either management or supervisors as a contributing factor.

    As for the "crazy" comment. Sometimes people who don't really understand things think anything that they don't know about is crazy. Unless you are doing things like having a front end loader putting down pressure on the counter weight of your crane while making the lift to keep from flipping over! Yea seen things like that back in the day!
     
  10. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    What the house looks like- with all the iron for the decks in place. Three of them are actually under the overhang of the house 2'. They just put some 2x6's between them all, to hold them in place- its supposed to be pretty windy here today.



    Glad to bring up the memories of the quarry kshansen- I like working with those guys, they've usually got their stuff together, and are willing to do whatever I need to get the job done.

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