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Just some work pics

Discussion in 'Cranes' started by crane operator, Aug 20, 2016.

  1. td25c

    td25c Senior Member

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    Well that really was not your fault Crane Op . Ok, who left the old truck rims by the tree ? :oops::D

    Nice work ! We have a lot of narrow roads like on the box culvert job . 75 % of the job is getting in and getting out .
    Actual lift might take half hour . But that's part of it .:)
     
  2. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    The Rt was really slick for that culvert job. No big long hood sticking out there to reach over top of, to get the culverts off the trucks.

    First two pics are a deck / addition, the last two were a truss job- knepptune loves it when I get to throw a lot of wood down. The first two pics job, the drivers side jacks both had that much wood under them. and - Yes, the front left tire is still touching in the third picture, but I was close to level. 20170207_090355.jpg 20170207_091057.jpg 20170208_115447.jpg 20170208_130237.jpg
     
  3. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    More precast. We were blocked in by a pump truck so I wanted to set all I could from one side- I got boomed down pretty close. The hollow core's went about 7,000lbs, the big end patio was 22,500lbs again. 20170209_084932.jpg 20170209_135009.jpg 20170210_083505.jpg 20170210_103246.jpg
     
  4. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    The truck drivers hate this site, every one of them looks at that corner and says they can't make it. We explain how every other driver has, and watch them all struggle. We did unhook and spin a few trailers for their company drivers, the contract truckers just suffered. Was really pretty last night as the sun was going down. 20170209_153817.jpg 20170209_154020.jpg 20170209_154025.jpg 20170209_174032.jpg
     
  5. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    And I did get to spend the afternoon looking right into the sun. How can this happen that often?

    The ironworkers have also been beside me- they've got all their stick out on their 30 ton rt. Every time he moves that crane, the whole house does a little walk around, either the frame flexes a lot, or his turntable bearing is shot. 20170210_134753.jpg 20170210_144745.jpg 20170210_134740.jpg
     
  6. 1965IHdiesel

    1965IHdiesel Member

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    Are all the floors precast panels? Do they hook together somehow or do they just sit side by side?

    Always enjoy the pics! I dont work around cranes, just dirt stuff, but find all the crane stuff fascinating. Lot of knowledge and planning behind the scenes that I never really thought about before!
     
  7. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    Those are some great pictures, putting that much weight up that high would take some getting used to. My arse was puckering up just looking at the pictures. Great work, you've got some skills.
     
  8. Knepptune

    Knepptune Senior Member

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    Looks good man. Seems like you have a fair amount of work for that 70t.

    And I'm just happy you get to throw all that lumber. Gotta be good for your heart to get a decent workout when you set up.

    If that terex rt is a 30t then it's just the frame flexing. A boom truck almost feels more stable then those terex cranes. It took some getting used when we got ours. It's got a good chart and the 94' main is nice but it sure ain't no grove.
     
  9. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    1965IHdiesel- All the floors are precast, walls are concrete block. The panels are solid on the outside patio's and walkways, the inside floors are hollow. The panels just sit tight together, then are grouted in the joints. They will come back and pour a skim coat for a smooth floor.
    Thanks tradesman- the lifting high with big weight is like anything else- the more you do it- the more you get used to it. That said, I wish my 70 ton had another 10,000 lbs of counterweight on it, you can feel it over the side when getting some radius with 7,000. I think the furthest out piece was 70' away.
    Knepptune- the 70 ton is hit and miss- it seems like lately I need two 70 tons (actually one 70 ton and a 100-150 ton- but I can't swing one-$:rolleyes:) and none of the little cranes. In a month it could be setting still- and just little crane work. I will enjoy it while it's busy.

    I will admit to learning something yesterday. If you look in the picture of the ironworker's terex, you can see he has stowed his front windshield, on the other side of the upper, in a couple steel brackets. I always wondered what those steel brackets were for, on a terex upper, now I know.

    The precast guys are out of tennessee, they own their own 70 ton and 90 ton cranes. They set some of this building with their 90 ton, but hired me to set some of it, because their crane is tied up elsewhere. 5 years ago, I actually ran their 90 ton for a building project they had here in town. They were short a operator- and we weren't very busy. My tms300 was my biggest crane at the time, so its not like I was going to get the work either way. I've worked on two buildings for them with my 70 ton, since I've had it.

    Their 90 ton is a link belt-(2008 or so) and has a good chart, 141 main and 20,000 or so of counterweight. It's biggest problem is the regen system (cat c15 I think) doesn't work right. I struggled with it 5 years ago- I asked about it now- and it still has the same problems. Won't go into regen, and if it does, you can't work the crane or it cycles out of regen mode. Can't cycle it manually at the start or end of the day. It seemed like it would always call for a cycle at 10am, just when you were getting going, then you had to stop for 30 minutes while it would regen. That, and if it's hot, you had to run a garden hose on the hyd oil cooler to keep the oil cool.

    It was a real smooth operating crane- I just wouldn't own that one because of the regen issues. I think the slightly older ones with detroit 60 series are much less trouble.
     
  10. Knepptune

    Knepptune Senior Member

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    Crane op, I honestly saved the pic of that 30t because of that. I've always wondered what the flip those brackets were for.

    Locally company had one of those 8690's. They had a horrible time with it. One of their foremen told me that crane was useless if it had rained within the last day or so. Seemed their was something in the boom that reacted badly to any moisture. He said on a humid day you couldn't scope the boom in or out. They only owned it for a year or so. Seems like the 70t link-belts are the most common 70t crane you see, and the guys that have those love them. I have heard multiple horror stories about the boom scope system on their 90t's tho.
     
  11. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Got to set tower sections for a new amusement ride today. Tower ends up being 200' tall, I won't be able to set any more than the bottom two sections I set today. Probably bring in a 210 or 300 ton crane.

    Bottom section was 40' tall 10'x10' square, 25,000 lbs, the next section up was only 15,000. Bottom section welded on to base plates, with gusset attachments. Took a while for them to weld them out enough to stack the next section.

    20170213_091712.jpg 20170213_121127.jpg 20170213_120318.jpg 20170213_132657.jpg
     
  12. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Top section, and placing interior air pipes. We were standing around before unloading the bottom section, I joked that we would probably have to roll it. Sure enough, the installer comes over two minutes later and says we have to roll it to install the ride track.:rolleyes:

    I had one of the guys bring out the ball, to hang on the aux. winch so I could roll it in the air, so we didn't scratch the paint all up in the rocks. 20170213_151818.jpg 20170213_152213.jpg 20170213_163537.jpg 20170213_163539.jpg
     
  13. catfixer

    catfixer Well-Known Member

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    Looks like an interesting job for sure. That down in branson?
     
  14. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    catfixer- yes- right on 76 hwy., by one of the gokart tracks. Supposed to end up being the tallest thing in town, aside from cell towers.
     
  15. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Jaw crusher today. They removed this somewhere out in Oklahoma, the rest of it I think they're sending out next week. Then we'll have to come back and set it in the frames. 55,000 lbs.

    I got lucky, the ears on the top of the jaw were really wide, I only had 2 shackles with me that would fit it (1 3/8" or 1 1/2"), one of the mechanics had two the same size in his truck. If he hadn't had them, I would've had to double up some 1/2" steel chokers, or endless round slings 20170214_094217_LI.jpg 20170214_094228_LI (2).jpg 20170214_094733_LI.jpg and shove them through the hole. It would have kinked them pretty sharp, but I would have done it to offload it. 20170214_094717_LI.jpg
     
  16. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    Couple more beams on the house addition. Love my long jacks and only 20' outrigger span. A 24' outrigger span would be tough in a spot like this (I was kind of looking at boom trucks again, then I go to a site like this and am thankful for my old 250's) 20170216_082312.jpg 20170216_082341.jpg 20170216_082352.jpg 20170216_082717.jpg .
     
  17. Natman

    Natman Well-Known Member

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    So, lot's of vert travel in those outriggers? That's handy for sure. My boom truck would have had no problem setting up there either, just saying. But I need to make sure I have all the pads I can fit crammed under the pads before starting to jack it up. On the really steep slopes I sometimes have to take two bites at it, letting the tires down on blocks, then sucking the outriggers up, stacking even more dunnage up, then the second time finally get it level. A pain but it has got the job done, a couple times a year I need to do that. Nice looking post and beam structure.

    Where does your dog ride in that narrow cab? You do take a dog on your jobs, don't you?! One huge reason I bought the Mack/National was that it has power windows, handy for letting the dog do his thing at cyclists and joggers as we drive by. My dog livens up the work day a lot, I take him on about 75% or more of my jobs, my steady customers complain if I don't!
     
  18. Kiwi-truckwit

    Kiwi-truckwit Member

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    Love that long stroke! That's the problem with modern cranes, the stroke is pretty terrible, even with the rough terrain cranes. Benefit of the all terrains though is you can get level with the suspension first, making it easy to block up. It's not often now that I need to wobble up a big stack of blocks!
     
  19. Tradesman

    Tradesman Senior Member

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    Are those super singles on your crane? I've always wondered what the pros and cons are of them.
     
  20. crane operator

    crane operator Senior Member

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    natman-- The jack stroke on the tms 200-250's is great, one advantage of the old grove carriers, over a boom truck, is you get a way stiffer chassis. I've never put blocks under the tires to get another bite on jacking up. You can simply use a back jack, to raise the front, and go back and forth. In a real steep spot, or with my heavier boomed 300, I sometimes have to swing over the other side and teeter totter to raise it up. But that's in a spot steep enough, that it slides down the hill a little when coming off the tires, not on one like this. This job site isn't really unusual in my area, for level. I've been in much worse.

    Most boom trucks have too much frame flex, or droop if you have two-stage outrigger beams, to walk back and forth from front to rear jacks. You're fortunate in your national natman, to have the single stage beams, if you go up to the 33 or 40 ton's they have the two stage beams, and a wider span. Those are the boom trucks I usually have to look at (30-40 ton), to get the chart I need to replace one of my truck cranes. The big advantage with the newer truck cranes is the long main power boom, sometimes its a battle to have enough room to swing jib.

    Kiwi-- I've run liebherr and grove/krupp all terrains, the hydraulic suspension on those is very nice. You can just tip the carrier to level, crib up, and then jack up. It's too bad they are so expensive to buy, and maintain, I can't justify a 50 ton AT in my area, and get the rates I would need to make it pay, I wouldn't be competitive. I will agree on the short jacks on most rough terrains. They aren't terrible, because they are usually compact, but some have such big tires, and such short jacks, that the pads barely touch the ground in a level spot, let alone if its crooked. I ran a terex 50 ton rt for a little while, it had a carrier like a 70 ton, and only a 105' main boom, it was a good picking crane with that heavy undercarriage, but it had really short jacks.

    Tradesman- those aren't technically super singles on the rear- The "over the road truckers" super singles are 445/50r22.5. Those are simply 385's, like a floater steer tire, just smaller than a 425 floater steer tire. That crane is actually 385's steer and drive both, it just has a different offset on the rear rims. Having singles on the rear instead of duals makes it a little lighter on the rear, and you have 4 less tires to buy, but they are more expensive tires. Floaters are terrible in the mud. A set of duals will bite in, the floats just slide around on top. Don't ever put super singles on a truck you go offroad with a lot, they will get stuck in a heartbeat. I'm blessed with lots of rock where I live, so not much mud, or snow, so they do okay. If it is muddy, I'll take my other 25 ton which has 11r22.5 duals on it. The 385's were on the crane when I bought it, and I will probably switch it to 11r or 12r duals when I need new drives.