1. Thank you for visiting HeavyEquipmentForums.com! Our objective is to provide industry professionals a place to gather to exchange questions, answers and ideas. We welcome you to register using the "Register" icon at the top of the page. We'd appreciate any help you can offer in spreading the word of our new site. The more members that join, the bigger resource for all to enjoy. Thank you!

How to bury a horse?

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by nutwood, Feb 28, 2013.

  1. nutwood

    nutwood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    113
    Location:
    Tasmania
    I'm chasing operating techniques to dig a grave.
    The problem I have is a much loved, but failing, nag, belonging to the other half.:(
    A hole is required. The equipment to hand is a 70hp dozer and a small backhoe.
    The ground is rocky and hard. 300mm top soil, 600mm clay, 100mm indeterminate and then hard pan. The rocks are plentiful and large.
    The backhoe will eat the top soil, struggle through the clay and then basically stop at the hard pan, assuming it doesn't hit a rock first.:eek:
    The dozer will quickly tidy away the top soil, ready for re-use, peel away the clay, and providing the area's large enough to use the ripper, keep heading down through the hard pan.
    The problem is the size of the hole. I've plenty of space to work in but I'd really like some advice as to how to maximise depth without covering too much ground.
    The dozer has a single off-set ripper. Should I aim at a trench 1.5 dozer widths? Problem is it might rapidly narrow, as the ripper is well inside the line of the tracks, depends how much the blade corners can take out. Should I simply go for broke and build a huge mound whilst lowering a tennis court sized area into the ground. Might be the simplest but the chances are I'll hit some big rocks which will turn into projects of their own as I create another hole digging them out!
    I'm wondering how practical it is to work the dozer in a circle, with a ramp leading out for the spoil. Seems hard on steering clutches and one rock would spoil the party.
    Any advice from those who've had to dig a hole with a dozer will be much appreciated!:)
     
  2. Jeembawb

    Jeembawb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    Muckay, Australia
    Welcome back Nutwood - doesn't sound like an easy situation all round. Them rocks & the hardpan sound like a job for a 20 ton excavator. Do you have a goal depth? 6 foot? Does your backhoe have the reach to dig out a short, semi steep (@ each end) slot? You maybe able to scratch up some hard pan using corner tips & tilt at the bottom of a reasonably steep ramp (& using the down ramp force of the dozer) but may have trouble getting it out with the dozer when it gets deep without making the hole & slot too big - if enough reach with the hoe you could scratch out the loosened material that way? Just an idea - haven't had to do it that way though. Big rocks could be a spanner in the works but.

    Jimbob
    :Cowboy:
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2013
  3. g_man

    g_man Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Messages:
    260
    Occupation:
    Retired
    Location:
    Northeastern VT
    Go as deep as you can easy. Then push a mound on top. It will go down in short order.
     
  4. Delmer

    Delmer Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2013
    Messages:
    4,160
    Location:
    WI
    Do you have an Ikea nearby?
     
  5. 83Jim

    83Jim Member

    Joined:
    Nov 19, 2012
    Messages:
    17
    Location:
    Jacksboro, TN
    Sorry to hear about the situation.

    Might help things along to apply powdered lime to the remains before covering them.
     
  6. qball

    qball Senior Member

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,071
    Occupation:
    local 150 operator
    Location:
    il
  7. mitch504

    mitch504 Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2010
    Messages:
    3,767
    Location:
    Andrews SC
    I can tell you from experience that you need to get 2-3 feet of dirt over it. It's not good when the dog brings your wife a piece of her old friend. You should leave the dirt mounded a foot or so over it also, so that you don't end up with a hole later.
     
  8. JGS Parts

    JGS Parts Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2012
    Messages:
    541
    Occupation:
    Owner JGS Machinery
    Location:
    Australia/China
    haha I think a few joints in the euro zone would take it for there meat balls mate
     
  9. TomA

    TomA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2012
    Messages:
    59
    Location:
    Mariposa, CA
    I just had to deal with the same thing. Horse dropped dead one night in rainstorm. Lots of rocks boulders and dg. Trusty 63 year old Cat HT4 loader had been having oil pressure issues but hung in low green. Took not too long to dig hole. Hit no boulders. Pushed horse in. As soon as I got some dirt in I started compacting. Coyotes had tunneled in to calf I buried a few years back. About the time I finished the oil pressure was pegged thank goodness. Got her up on blocks checking oil screen. Kept checking grave site, no tunneling, all good, planted oats.
     
  10. Jeembawb

    Jeembawb Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 2, 2012
    Messages:
    156
    Location:
    Muckay, Australia
    I like the ideas of easy dig as far as poss then mound up a little with a bit of lime. I had to do a similar thing to that when dingoes got a couple of our pet boer goats - it's been around 18 months now & I figure to plant tree on top soon that likes blood & bone fertiliser.

    Jimbob
     
  11. Construct'O

    Construct'O Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    928
    Occupation:
    Dozerwork,tiling plus many more!!!!!!!
    Location:
    SW Iowa
    Couple options! Found a high bank of dirt then try digging your hole next to the toe of the slope,if your lucky you will will get deep enough without issues.If not, to finish the job you could rob some extra dirt of the high part of the bank,blending you grave into the same degree as the slope.Thus not making a big mound in the middle of nowhere.

    I know you don't want to hear this,but there is alway the option to cremating it.Equals smaller hole, less depth and space needed.Good luck.
     
  12. Queenslander

    Queenslander Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2009
    Messages:
    578
    Location:
    Australia
    Sounds like this would be your easiest option, provided you have plenty of timber on hand,maybe a stickraked heap.
    Cheers, Greg
     
  13. snocrete

    snocrete Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2011
    Messages:
    64
    Occupation:
    concrete, light excavating, snow & ice management
    Location:
    illinois
    My first thought was dig the hole just big enough for the horse with the backhoe...then go rent a hyd breaker for the backhoe "IF" you run into rock.

    I cant imagine using a dozer for such a thing..?..?..Seems silly the amount of time/fuel/wear & tear on a dozer, just to bury a horse?.?..You'd end up with a hole big enough to bury 20 horses.

    I buried a horse for a friend right before winter hit. The horse was ill and wondered off into some thick timber deep on their property, and just killed over. You could barely get to it by foot...the owner was insistent on getting it buried.
     
  14. FSERVICE

    FSERVICE Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2009
    Messages:
    622
    Location:
    indiana
    im gonna ask a dumb question, but iv had several people tell me this "its illegal to bury a horse" check on this before someone shows up & starts asking questions.
     
  15. Errol

    Errol Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2009
    Messages:
    41
    Location:
    Kamloops BC
    Last year a neighbor came over and asked if I would bury a horse for a lady up the road that was going to have to put her horse down.

    I said, well, fuel, and time, loading and unloading the machine, a couple hundred should cover it.

    Well!! the neighbour said, considering the lady's pending grief, I thought you'd be a better neighbor, I'll go get my cousin to do it.

    OK, I replied. You do that.

    Funny, that neighbor still doesn't come around any more.
     
  16. MBTRAC

    MBTRAC Member

    Joined:
    May 22, 2012
    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    Australia
    As others have suggested burn it, don't bury it (though wait until the end of the fire season.....) it's a whole lot easier, cheaper, cleaner & you don't risk consequential wildlife damage if you using toxins rather a bullet to put the animal down - on the odd occassion when we've had to put any of our stock down we always burn (in preference to bury where you bury the carcass can last for years) & with a slow pile burn there'll be nothing left in a day o so.
     
  17. NZfarm

    NZfarm Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2011
    Messages:
    15
    Occupation:
    Sheep @ beef farmer
    Location:
    New zealand
    Waste not want not, we feed our old horses, crook cows to the dogs (we have 8) easy to clean up from under the kennel. Otherwise a 4 foot deep hole and mound the dirt on top, down wind from the house if its close.
     
  18. Iwegian

    Iwegian Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2012
    Messages:
    19
    Location:
    iowa
    i would check out composting it. Hog confinements do it here in Iowa. there are some video's on You Tube.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2013
  19. nutwood

    nutwood Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    Messages:
    113
    Location:
    Tasmania
    Well, I made a start on the job this evening. I appreciate the point being made by those who can't understand the fuss being made over a horse but this was a horse mad girl's first horse. Cost me $3000 more years ago than I'm prepared to mention. All things come to an end and this is the end for this horse.
    The spot chosen is one much liked by the client. Naturally on top of a hill, rather than down in the valley where there's good deep soil! Anyway, I've adopted a slot system. 1.5 blade widths across. The topsoil I removed first and pushed uphill, ready for easy covering. I hit hardpan early, virtually no clay band, but it's breaking up well. One ripper pass is shattering it out nearly a metre either side. I'm creating a spoil pile either end of my trench where I push up the pile and deposit over the top. Basically I'm creating a valley between two piles; as it gets deeper, it gets wider. The trench is just wide enough for me to spin and work the other way.
    I've hit a few rocks but not in bad spots and none over a metre across. They've all come out readily and I've simply bowled them down the back of my spoil heaps. I'm down about 1.5m. If I can get another metre I'll reckon the job done. Mind you, the hole would fit a few more horses; what it lacks in depth, it makes up for in area. Perhaps I should advertise?:)
     
  20. DoyleX

    DoyleX Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2013
    Messages:
    440
    Occupation:
    Lever Puller, Gear Jammer, Pipe Twister
    Location:
    Minnesota
    This will be the best way to do it. I hide mountains of clearing brush this way. Make sure to cover it below the frost line and or the animal line.