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Eimco Dozer?????

Discussion in 'Dozers' started by joedirt, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. joedirt

    joedirt Well-Known Member

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    I have never seen one of these. This tractor was just outside Flagstaff AZ about 50 miles. They have welded a homemade ripper on the front. For fear of getting shot, I didn't look under the hood but I'm suspecting a Detroit engine. Anyone know anything about these??? Thanks Joe :usa
     

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  2. RKO

    RKO Well-Known Member

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    Eimco Dozer

    I know nothing about these, as I only saw one other one that was setting in the woods in PA. I tried to find the owner of that one so I could buy it. I ran out of time and when I got back to Pa. the next time, the area was built to houses. I thought it was a neat looking ,machine. Also I thought the design was ahead of it's self. Look at the new track loaders and were the cab is?
     
  3. Construct'O

    Construct'O Senior Member

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    By the size of the stack i would say it had something besides Detroit.Most of the Detroits that old didn't have a turbo.The machines that did have turbos usually had a large exhaust stack.

    At least it is still running by the shine on the tracks.It still moves on it's own.I would think if it was mine i would be saving it for an antique instead of betting it over the back.

    I would also think with the dozer in the front and engine on the rear that the dozer wouldn't go in the ground as good.Reason for the ripper,but sure it is has something to do with working in that rocky hard dry ground the looks of things.

    Nice find,thanks for sharing.:cool2:notworthy:usa
     
  4. iron kid

    iron kid Well-Known Member

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    looks like a older asv skid steer
     
  5. 72V

    72V Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for posting those pictures. I've heard some about them but never seen a modern photo of one.
     
  6. RonG

    RonG Charter Member

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    Eimco built mining equipment as I understand it.That dozer was used for a while by the military,I am meaning to say that style of dozer.There were 3 or 4 different sizes and I am pretty sure they all used Cummins engines.There are websites that give better info if you are interested.Mr Google will smarten us all up.Ron G
     
  7. tonka

    tonka Senior Member

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    I found this off google!
     

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  8. bobcat ron

    bobcat ron Banned

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    I don't think it would push very well, big dozers need weight up front to keep the traction even.
     
  9. 72V

    72V Well-Known Member

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    Eimco

    This thread was on Ibdozing.... interesting read.

    http://discuss.ibdozing.com/cgi-bin/discus/discus.cgi

    Go to "Equipment Specifications / Characteristics", and then "Crawler with front operating position" to get to the thread. The link just takes you to the general forum.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2008
  10. surfer-joe

    surfer-joe Senior Member

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    Not sure about the model designation on this one. It looks to be about the size of a model 118, that's about a D7 size machine.

    I ran 118's extensively in Vietnam. They were equipped with Detroit 6V71 engines and were very loud. However, they were a well balanced and very maneuverable machine. We had some with rippers and some with winches. Never ran one that didn't have one setup or the other. Oh, some were equipped with angle dozers, others with straight blades. I preferred the straight blades myself.

    Visibility over the front was excellent, never really had much issue with down pressure. Operation was straight forward and simple. Two sticks between knees -- use left hand to push sticks ahead, machine moved ahead. Pull back for reverse. To turn, move stick on that side into neutral and use individual foot brake, or pull one stick into reverse to counter-rotate tracks. Right hand controlled blade or ripper/winch, right foot controlled de-accelerator. High center of gravity, did not like to work on side hills much with them. Also did not like clearing operations on steep slopes.

    This machine has a nice ROPS, ours did not. Late in 1968, Eimco's started showing up with Caterpillar undercarriage components. Word was that Eimco had gone belly up and the government, still being short on contract fulfillment, had commissioned someone to use Cat hardware to finish up those machines at the factory lacking undercarriages. The full story of that would make a fascinating tale I'm sure.

    Eimco made a smaller machine that used a Detroit 471 engine. I only ever saw one and that was at the dump in Davisville, RI. The one shown here may be what I believe was called a model 104 and it's maybe been re-powered with something other than a Detroit, or maybe a turbo has been added.

    I could be wrong on the models, it's been a long time.

    I've looked for years for more info on Eimco and the short-lived dozer contract. Never found a thing.
     
  11. 72V

    72V Well-Known Member

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    Surfer Joe, there's a picture and description of the "Unidrive" transmission used in the Eimco crawler in the "Moving the Earth" book (Second Edition), pages 15-18,19. On page 16-32 there's a picture of the model 105 "RockerShovel".

    They seem to be an pretty interesting machine. I notice the top rollers are mounted with one inboard (Cat style) and one outboard (IH style).
     
  12. RKO

    RKO Well-Known Member

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    The one I saw in Pa. had a Detroit in it. It looked like it was factory and not something some one added. I think it was an 6v71 with the old Detroit blower on it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2008
  13. hardtail

    hardtail Well-Known Member

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  14. shack

    shack Member

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    I wonder if it would be light in the front end.
     
  15. mlseel72409

    mlseel72409 Member

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    Occupation:
    eimco mechanic
    Location:
    ashfork az
    Hello everyone. I will be more than happy to answer all you're questions about this eimco dozer, as I work for the person who owns it. It's a model 103c. It was built in Salt Lake City, Ut in 1969. It is 100% stock with the exception of the exhaust stack. This was fabricated by the owner to hide the unsightly muffler. It came from the factory with a 4-71 detroit with a blower, not a turbo. There are no cat parts on it nor are any interchangeable to my knowledge. Transmission is a 4 speed automatic, not sure if it's a unidrive or quadratorque. It runs and works well. It does work on a regular basis and pushes about the same as a d-7 even though it is smaller. There is absolutely no problem with traction. In fact, it gets to much! It's a very well balanced machine and a pure joy to operate! If anyone has information on this machine or anything else eimco please contact me, it would be appreciated. And please send questions, all will be answered. The owner of this dozer has done exstensive research and is a wealth of information but more is always better, right!
     
  16. mackman

    mackman Well-Known Member

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    eimco dozer

    I have a couple of 103mc m64 eimco dozers my grandad had one years ago when he passed it was sold. I surched for a long time to find one and finaly I did. A man who lived near us sold equipment and had 18 at one time they were military surplus the "mc's" were built for the U.S. Marines. I love to run them they are good pushing dozers they are a little rougher riding that other dozers but are easy to run. I located another machine and I am trying to get it bought so I can have one just for parts. I don't know about the "c" but most of the "mc" undercarriage will interchange with a "d6c". The "mc" has some unique features like the fan can be loosened from the drive belts with a lever at the back of the machine for fording through deep water. They came from the factory withe 6v-71's and had a shipping weight of 20.5 ton. I have a copy of the shop manual which tells everything you would ever want to know.
     
  17. VFW_HAL

    VFW_HAL Member

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    I also have a MC 106 (M64)
    SN 1033372
    MFG 1966
    Have had it for 8 or 9 years and it's great for the work here on the ranch. I have been looking for a manual off and during all this time but now I'm starting to have a problem. The right track won't hold tension. I fill it with grease but in about 10 minuets I have to stop and do it again. I'm sure the grease seal is leaking but ... need the procedure for doing the repair. I would love a copy of your manual and happily pay copying fees. Certainly the section on repairing the tensioning cylinders would be most appreciated.
     
  18. tpitt

    tpitt Well-Known Member

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    Seabees had tons of them when I was in the service. 66 through 69. The ones we had were all Detroits. If I remember right you could reverse each track individually just by pulling back on the sticks. They were an operaters nightmare though. All the enemy had to do was aim between the lights. Fortunately I didn't run dozers in Vietnam. I drove truck mostly. Somewhere I even have an Eimco watch fob.
     
  19. mag6000

    mag6000 Well-Known Member

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    Here are few Eimcos in a yard in Moab, Utah. They had mutiple units resting there. A couple still had military paint. I've come across quite a few Eimco dozers in my travels through the western desert states.
     

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  20. surfer-joe

    surfer-joe Senior Member

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    I know of two Eimco tractors sitting outside a barn near Safford, AZ. Came across them this summer on my delivery route. Not much left of either one other than main frame, roller frames, tracks, and I believe one blade. Engines and transmissions are gone. I always meant to stop and take pictures, but was always in too much of a hurry.

    There are many other machines along that run that need to have pictures taken. Maybe later this year or next spring I will gather up the ole lady and drive up there for a day and burn a bunch of photos.