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Demolition, clearing and grading

Discussion in 'Showtime!' started by Landclearer, May 18, 2014.

  1. Landclearer

    Landclearer Senior Member

    Joined:
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    Been a while since i posted any pics. Its just been crazy busy. Here are some misc pics.

    A couple building pads we did this week.


    warrior 003.jpg
    Got the screen loaded and ready to head to the next one.
    warrior 001.jpg
    Here is 27 tons of export pine logs.
    stump2.JPG
    A 3 phase power line that was bored through a 30 inch pine stump. The line was de-energized before we started and the line was located.
    stump3.JPG
     
  2. Landclearer

    Landclearer Senior Member

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    Just a couple pics from Saturday afternoon. Went out to the pit to dig a little dirt and strip some topsoil. Very enjoyable running the 6, I couldn't hear a phone ring if I wanted to:p. d61.JPG d62.JPG d63.JPG
     

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  3. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Running what I brung and taking what I win
    Location:
    Alabama
    That's some fine topsoil LC, I bet once it's ran through the screener it fetches top dollar.

    The pine logs for export, where are they headed?
     
  4. Landclearer

    Landclearer Senior Member

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    Hey CM. Yes we do have good topsoil along the coast. Most of the area was tomato farms at one time or another. Farming is all but gone now, the only thing we grow around here now is apartment complexes and subdivisions.

    The export logs go to China, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia depending on the exporter.
     
  5. CM1995

    CM1995 Super Moderator

    Joined:
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    Occupation:
    Running what I brung and taking what I win
    Location:
    Alabama
    Jealous of those digging conditions at the moment. The chert pit we are digging structural fill out of is very hard and abrasive. Put a new set of teeth on the hoe Wed. of last week, dug 10 hours Thursday, 4 hours Friday and 8 hours today - will need a new set tomorrow.:confused:

    We put a new set on the '53 before we mob'd to this job and it's in need of a new set as well. The loader has only been support for the hoe in the pit cleaning up the haul road and pushing down the slopes.

    Must be nice digging and grading that sand.:D

    Since you are close to the coast, how does the salt water/air affect the equipment?

    Never would've thought southern yellow pine would be an exportable commodity. You have any idea of what they are using it for? Gotta be expensive wood once it lands there.
     
  6. Landclearer

    Landclearer Senior Member

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    Location:
    Southeast
    There are 2 good things about sand, easy digging and easy dewatering. Our 300 has over 2000 hours on the teeth and it has done some demo and worked in concrete.

    If you go about a mile inland the sand turns from white/gray beach sand to and orange course sand. The white stuff is not the best grading material but the inland sand grades great as well as compacts with minimal water. If you go about a mile inland the salt in the air is much less also. You get surface rust pretty quick if you are close to the beach but inland it is much better.

    As for the export logs, as far as I know they cut lumber out of them. There is nothing special about the logs other than they have to have a 10 inch tip and be pretty straight and not to many knots. Lumber must be real expensive over there because they pay us more than the local lumber mill plus they have to load the containers, ship them, unload them and do the milling.

    I added a few pics of the screening from early in the week then moved to a clearing job with the cutter. Moved the grinder in late Sat and will grind and stump this week. 1400.JPG 14002.JPG 14003.JPG 14004.JPG