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Coal Chute

Discussion in 'Trucks' started by Orchard Ex, Jul 29, 2006.

  1. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    I had a coal chute built in my tailgate this time to try and cut down on the number of times I have to "touch" materials. Tried it out with 3/4 stone and it worked OK except for trying to close it between bucketfuls. The track that the door rides in is pretty loose and gets full of stone as the stone runs out. That makes it hard to close the door down and stop the flow. At the job site not to big a deal, but it would be nice to get the door down tight for the trip home and not worry about buying a windshield for the guy tailgating me.

    I was thinking of adding some heavy rubber "gasket" type of thing on each side of the inside of the opening. Wide enough that when the door went up the gasket would fold back and cover the track and as the door comes down it would (hopefully) push the gasket back flat against the inside of the door.

    Has anybody already invented this wheel?

    I can try to take/draw pictures if it'll help explain.

    Thanks
     
  2. Squizzy246B

    Squizzy246B Administrator

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    Some pics would be good, but a door/gate that comes up from the bottom is better than one that comes down from the top if you know what I mean.
     
  3. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    Not that this addresses the question, but concerning coal chutes...

    A guy I once worked for had his trucks set up with three coal chutes--left right and center. He explained to me that when doing work along the shoulder of a road, he'd dump his aggregate in a windrow right along the edge of the pavement, and then just push it into the hole with the backhoe. That saved a lot of running back and forth to a stockpile somwhere.

    Ok, back to the topic...
     
  4. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    "Alright Mr. Digger! If you're QUITE DONE, we can continue!!" (imagine that in you're favorite nun voice) :yup

    Here's the coal chute closed:
    DSCN0784 (Small).JPG
    Coal Chute open:
    Track is about 3/4" wide and fills with rock/junk and blocks the door from closing down
    DSCN0783 (Small).JPG
    I'm thinking of attaching a strip of "gasket" down the inside, behind/against the door so that when it goes up the gasket folds back flat against the side of the opening, covering the track and keeping the junk out. As the door comes down the strip would be forced back in and the track would be clear - hopefully. I was thinking of maybe using some conveyor material or something tough like that.
    gasket (Small) .jpg
    Think it'll fly?
     
  5. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Senior Member

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    When I had a truck with a coal chute the bottom rail under the tracks was open, this would allow any materials large enough to fit into the track to either fall through or be forced through by closing the door. Never really had any closing problems./
     
  6. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    Better be careful--All I have to do is say the word "Gecko" and me and the other class clowns will have you scrolling back three pages looking for the last mention of a coal chute... :bouncegri

    til then...

    I don't think your gasket has to fold all the way back, flat over the grooves--actually, I think that would be just as much of a problem, as the door would have to force it back, and it just seems like it would offer too much resistance to make it worth the trouble. However, if your gasket material was stiff enough that it bent back just partway--enough to shield the groove but not necessarily cover it, I think that would be enough. Also, the material would be stiff enough then that it would want to bend back out of the way on its own, as opposed to the door actually having to push it back.
     
  7. Ford LT-9000

    Ford LT-9000 Banned

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    The doors in tail gates are mainly for asphalt work I don't think anybody around here uses them for anything else its why they are called pavement gates.

    I don't think there is much you can do to cure the problem.
     
  8. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder

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    I've had that problem with my chute too and I think the solution is to cut openings for the debris to fall away as has been mentioned. I'm not convinced your idea will work, and I'm willing to bet it will be more difficult to clean the slots with your gasket in place.
     
  9. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Senior Member

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    Related but not directly, I also would have problems just closing through any material larger then say 1". Chutes are mainly for sand, processed and such I guess.

    We tried loading wheelbarrows with River Round once and found it too hard to control the flow.
     
  10. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    The holes at the rail bottom make sense.
    I'm not explaining the gasket thing right, it's really more of a deflector, like Digger was saying. It would get attached 90 degrees to the door and be wide enough that when the door is closed the strip is folded and resting against it maybe 3". As the door goes up the strip would spring back across the gap. As the door comes back down it would refold the strip.
    I'm sure that it would be more trouble than it's worth, but if I get slack this winter - lookout coal door! :bash

    Just to hijack my own thread - Digger, something similar to the windrow. One summer a company I worked for did a bunch of asphalt curbing, the best rig up we found to feed the little hand curbing machine was to put the salt auger on the back and feed the hot mix out like salt to a spinner. Worked pretty well.
     
  11. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    Orchard, how about if you did something like this. Remove a triangle of steel from the lower corners of the door, and weld a similiar size triangle of metal in the tracks on both sides.

    This would force the dirt/gravel to exit the tracks.
     

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  12. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    Hmmm... That has some merit too.... plus it uses the welder and torch, another 2 points in its favor...
     
  13. Jeff D.

    Jeff D. Senior Member

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    AND a can of blue rustolium!!:thumbsup

    It looks like it would be hard to remove the door though. It appears that the door is too tall to slip out of the tracks without removing those linkage pivots above it.
     
  14. Dwan Hall

    Dwan Hall Senior Member

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    You could add a lever to the linkage for leverage and cut the bottom of the door slides so the dirt will fall free. ( I think that is what others have sugested.)
     

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  15. digger242j

    digger242j Administrator

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    Now see, the way I envisioned it, the strip is flat against the insdie of the dooe when the door is closed, and when you open the door the material pushes the strip and it bends to cover the groove. Once the material runs out, or the door is closed. the strip bends back to its original position
     

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  16. Dwan Hall

    Dwan Hall Senior Member

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    Only thing I can see wrong with the gasket is if you haul shot rock or stumps they will tare the gasket off. I like the "V" cut on the bottom of the door and the filler in the slot.
     
  17. Orchard Ex

    Orchard Ex Super Moderator

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    Digger, I think we're looking at 2 sides of the same coin. This was what I was thinking originally. The opening is so thick I figured that the whole works could be inside the coal chute. Very similar to yours.
    coal door.JPG
    CT & Steve - When you said holes I was thinking that you meant through the bottom of the tailgate under the tracks... Is that right or more like what Dwan drew - the bottom back of the track removed so that when the door comes down it pushes the junk out and it can fall off the back.
    Dwan - it would be fairly easy to cut out an inch or so of the bottom of the track. that might work. I think you are probably right about it getting torn up.
    Jeff - Yep to get the door out I'd have to cut off the bushings that hold the torque tube. The whole thing was welded in place so that you can't remove the door if it gets messed up. :Banghead

    Lots of good ideas, Thanks everybody!
     
  18. CT18fireman

    CT18fireman Senior Member

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    On mine the track for the door and the "sill" were proud (stuck out past) of the plane of the tailgate. The sill and the bottom of the tracks was notched to allow stuff to fall out. Another option might be to notch out the track itself to push material out as Dwan had said.

    A Drill and a little time with a die grinder should do the trick.
     
  19. Steve Frazier

    Steve Frazier Founder

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    I have the same style as Jesse, the bottom of the sill can be cut out.

    Your design is ingenious, I'm curious to see how it works out for you.