Page 3 of 26 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 380

Thread: who makes the BEST dozer

  1. #31
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Morenci, AZ
    Posts
    65
    Quote Originally Posted by Deas Plant
    On top of that, it puts its grunt on the ground far better than the Cat D10R that I recently 'played' with for 3 hours.

    I hear you there - 10R's are too light in the tail end for much of anything outside of pioneering. They make you work 5 times as hard to hog a berm or pile off the edge as a 10N or 10T.

    I do like the clutches on a 10R though, and although unneccessary, I like playing with all the "productivity" goodies on the VIDS.

  2. #32
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    1

    Question Cat vs Komatsu vs JD vs Dressta

    I am kind of under the same dilemma; I work a power station where we push a lot of coal with a 31 yd blade. Right now we have a 92 D8N with around 36k - 40k hours (~3k+/yr). We're looking to purchase a new equivalent (size) machine. Right off the bat I was going for the Cat D8T with the same specs, typically heard that Cat is the dozer for longevity. The question was posed why not one of the other brands? Their probably less $$, so I started to gather info on the JD 1050C, Dressta TD-25M and the Komatsu D155 for comparison. I’ve been searching the web for any comparisons and /or reliability data to lead us one way or the other. Does anyone now of these types of sights (like consumer report)? Or any feedback one way or the other.
    The D8N we have now has done us well, typically engine or transmission rebuild around every 9,000 hours. Thank You. Jim O

  3. #33
    Senior Member rino1494's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NEPA
    Posts
    828
    We've been running case dozers for 30 years. They are overall a very well built machine and the basic design hasn't changed since we've been using them. We have a old Case 450 from the 60's with around 25,000 hrs on it that I just laid down 3,000 ton of modified for a development The paving contractor came and just touched it up with the grader without using more material. We recently just stripped it down and re-painted it. I'll post pics in a couple days.

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,014
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim O
    I am kind of under the same dilemma; I work a power station where we push a lot of coal with a 31 yd blade. Right now we have a 92 D8N with around 36k - 40k hours (~3k+/yr). We're looking to purchase a new equivalent (size) machine. Right off the bat I was going for the Cat D8T with the same specs, typically heard that Cat is the dozer for longevity. The question was posed why not one of the other brands? Their probably less $$, so I started to gather info on the JD 1050C, Dressta TD-25M and the Komatsu D155 for comparison. I’ve been searching the web for any comparisons and /or reliability data to lead us one way or the other. Does anyone now of these types of sights (like consumer report)? Or any feedback one way or the other.
    The D8N we have now has done us well, typically engine or transmission rebuild around every 9,000 hours. Thank You. Jim O
    I have heard that the 1050Cs are not holding up in high-hour usage nearly as well as contractors have liked. However, if you're not doing heavy stuff, it might be fine.

    Personally, I think the D8 is easily the best dozer in its class.
    Opinions expressed in this message are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of Caterpillar, Inc. or Bobcat Company, both of which are copyrighted trademarks of their respective companies.

  5. #35
    Senior Member 9420pullpan's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Central PA
    Posts
    1,150
    Definately go with a D8T b/c Cat has the best dozer from D6 and up...

    Name:  post-5-1097327213.jpg
Views: 7087
Size:  49.3 KB
    CASE

    Can't Attempt Serious Excavation

    Can't Afford Something Else

    Can't Accomplish Stupid Exercises

  6. #36
    Senior Member CascadeScaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Lynnwood, WA
    Posts
    1,152
    I read an article in Excavation and Grading Contractor magazine about doing dozer+pan and scaper+dozer combos. They found the 1050C's to be very nice for doing alot of back and forth of spreading. I can't recall if they were pulling pans with the 1050's or not, might have left the D8's for that, but overall they liked the hydro tranny vs. a standard clutch/brake combo. Apparently they hold up better and require less maintenance. As mentioned, it's tough to beat a D8T. I like the R's a little better, but the T's are nice as well.
    Pin it to win it

  7. #37
    Senior Member JimBruce42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    925
    Quote Originally Posted by CascadeScaper
    , ...but overall they liked the hydro tranny vs. a standard clutch/brake combo... .

    I thought that Cat's larger High final drive dozer's (such as the 8's) used a differential gearing for their steering, I know smaller ones like the D5n still use steering clutch/brakes, so am I wrong?


    On a different, I read an article in a Deere review pdf.( http://www.deere.com/en_US/cfd/const...U_dmag_www.pdf ) where a company was using Deere 1050's as their pan pullers. Well it's snowing, no school for me... back to bed

    -Jim
    Last edited by JimBruce42; 03-02-2006 at 09:36 AM.
    -Jim

    "Hit any key to continue "

  8. #38
    Senior Member CascadeScaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Lynnwood, WA
    Posts
    1,152
    Jim, you are correct, the D8's are diff. steer. I'm not 100% sure what the difference between Cat and Deere's 1050C are, but it sounded like the Deere system lasted longer in the words of one contractor, who knows. Maybe the company was running older D8's? They didn't say so it's hard to tell what they were comparing the 1050C's to, maybe older Deere machines? Hard to say.
    Pin it to win it

  9. #39
    Senior Member JimBruce42's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    925
    Thanks cascade. It's nice to know I have learned a few things in school
    -Jim

    "Hit any key to continue "

  10. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,014
    Quote Originally Posted by JimBruce42
    I thought that Cat's larger High final drive dozer's (such as the 8's) used a differential gearing for their steering, I know smaller ones like the D5n still use steering clutch/brakes, so am I wrong?


    On a different, I read an article in a Deere review pdf.( http://www.deere.com/en_US/cfd/const...U_dmag_www.pdf ) where a company was using Deere 1050's as their pan pullers. Well it's snowing, no school for me... back to bed

    -Jim
    Ryan went back to D8Ts... their's was a case example of where the 1050C was not holding up.

    And as for the 1050C -- it's hystat, like the rest of the Deere line.
    Last edited by Tigerotor77W; 03-03-2006 at 02:09 PM.
    Opinions expressed in this message are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of Caterpillar, Inc. or Bobcat Company, both of which are copyrighted trademarks of their respective companies.

  11. #41
    Senior Member CascadeScaper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Lynnwood, WA
    Posts
    1,152
    Tiger, is the hystat system on the 1050C still controlled by a single joystick in the left hand? Maybe their re-knob operators couldn't run a tiller bar
    Pin it to win it

  12. #42
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    1,014
    Yup, single joystick in the left-hand.

    I spoke to an operator who commented that in rough terrain, it became difficult to steer the machine in a straight line because the control requires constant adjustment (like on a skid steer, as opposed to the detent position of small dozers of Deere and Cat hystats).

    As for that tiller bar... I dunno... it certainly has its advantanges, but marketing really distorts its values (it seems).
    Opinions expressed in this message are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views or opinions of Caterpillar, Inc. or Bobcat Company, both of which are copyrighted trademarks of their respective companies.

  13. #43
    Banned
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    B.C. Canada
    Posts
    1,484
    The Cats with the high walker tracks with the final drive up and out of the muck and gravel is better. The Cat track skidders all come standard with high walker tracks.

    The tiller steer is to reduce operator fatique which is a must when your pushing on a hillside. At one of the local gravel mine where they are pushing material over a hill you need good control. I wish I had a picture of a cat pushing on the hill its pretty scary looking as your pushing material over a 60-70' drop off for the loaders at the bottom to scoop up the material and cart it off to the crusher.

    A long time cat skinner told me when your pushing on the hillside and you go to far you just ride it out the Cat will stay on its tracks sliding down the hill like a tobogan.

  14. #44
    Senior Member Dozerboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    2,078
    I demoed a 1050 about 2 years ago and IMO it was a POS compared to the D8R I was running and I'm not a big Cat fan. It rode ruff (steering was a problem), and you almost need ear plugs inside the cab with that hystat wine. After about two weeks I told the boss to have Deere come pick it up I wouldn't spend another day it in.

  15. #45
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
    Posts
    1,533

    Pushing over a drop/hillside.

    Hi, Ford LT-9000.
    Riding a dozer over a drop/hillside is all very well and good IF you have a continuous ramp all the way down and can take a blade of dirt with you. In that situation, I would agree with your old cat-skinner 'cos I've done it many times myself.

    However, you mentioned that in your application you have loaders taking the material away from the bottom. This has the potential for disaster if you go over the edge, especially if the loaders have undercut the material being pushed over to any extent.

    If you have ANY vertical or near-vertical wall on that face, especially at the top, you have the potential for an end-over-end. If the vertical section is at the bottom, i.e. undercut by the loaders, you also have the potential for a slip situation and when the ground that you are trying to stand or drive on is itself moving, you have NO control over your machine.

    Thanks but I'll try to stay on top if there is any vertical involved.

    You have a wonderful day. Best wishes. Deas Plant.

Page 3 of 26 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •