Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Electrically Conductive Grease

  1. #1
    Senior Member Countryboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,276

    Electrically Conductive Grease

    Who makes Electrically Conductive grease and what major automotive stores sell it. I've looked all over with no luck. I've asked at stores and most people don't know what I'm talking about. I've searched the internet and came up with a couple manufacturers but they don't list any stores where it's sold.

    This grease is different from Dielectric grease in that Dielectric grease is non- conductive. It's a neutral grease whose main purpose is to keep the elements (water, dirt) out of the connections. The grease I'm looking for actually conducts electricity.

    Any leads would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Charter Member RonG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Meriden ct
    Posts
    1,211
    I am curious about what it would be used for.Could you mix up something with powdered graphite in it maybe,seems like that would be conductive.If you only need a small amount it seems as though you could concoct a brew that would work.How about some fine copper dust mixed in with whatever else you could think of?This is interesting.What are you doing with it?. Ron G

  3. #3
    Administrator digger242j's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Southwestern PA
    Posts
    5,273
    I'd bet he wants to lubricate something that travels along it's power source.

    The first thing I thought of was the good old-fasioned "street cars". They had an arm that reached up and followed the overhead wires. (Yeah, I know. I'm showing my age...)
    Proudly spending today building the dilapidated housing of the 22nd century....


    Read the Forum Rules Here

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DFW
    Posts
    38
    Conductive Grease! You will find Silver and Carbon versions.

    Electronics stores and yes it depends on how much is needed.

    If you need a lot then Dow and Corning makes alot of it.

    www.nyelubricants.com/conducting.php

    http://www.sspinc.com/lubricants_spec.cfm look for SSP-1216 here.

    In the Navy we used Jet-Lube. they have a website but it leaves a lot to be desired. jetlube.com
    Last edited by thehose; 10-22-2007 at 01:12 PM.

  5. #5
    Senior Member MKTEF's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Norway
    Posts
    993
    All electricians that work with high current and amps do have this type of grease.
    They add it to the cables before crimping together to get good connection between the cable and crimped on shoes.
    Is also added to ends of cables when mounted into your fuseholder at home.

    Makes a bether connection without the need to tighten the hell out of the mounting bolts.
    Solves problems with overheat in the connection to the fuseholder.
    Have a nice day!

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DFW
    Posts
    38
    Quote Originally Posted by MKTEF View Post
    All electricians that work with high current and amps do have this type of grease.
    That's pretty much why we used it. Not high voltage though. I was an airplane electrician. We used it on plugs because in the high altitudes freezing makes the pins shrink a little and lose connection.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Countryboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,276
    Quote Originally Posted by RonG View Post
    I am curious about what it would be used for.Could you mix up something with powdered graphite in it maybe,seems like that would be conductive.If you only need a small amount it seems as though you could concoct a brew that would work.How about some fine copper dust mixed in with whatever else you could think of?This is interesting.What are you doing with it?. Ron G
    I had thought about something like that but thought it might be easier to just find it at a store....read as "Lazy" . Seems I might've been looking in the wrong places though.

    Quote Originally Posted by digger242j View Post
    I'd bet he wants to lubricate something that travels along it's power source.

    The first thing I thought of was the good old-fasioned "street cars". They had an arm that reached up and followed the overhead wires. (Yeah, I know. I'm showing my age...)
    Close....lubricating the reversers on the locomotives. They're getting some age on them and we are trying to get a little more life out of them. They run around $4,000 rebuilt and each locomotive has one. The tolerances are getting pretty far out so I figured I would give this a try.

    Quote Originally Posted by thehose View Post
    Conductive Grease! You will find Silver and Carbon versions.

    Electronics stores and yes it depends on how much is needed.

    If you need a lot then Dow and Corning makes alot of it.

    www.nyelubricants.com/conducting.php

    http://www.sspinc.com/lubricants_spec.cfm look for SSP-1216 here.

    In the Navy we used Jet-Lube. they have a website but it leaves a lot to be desired. jetlube.com
    Quote Originally Posted by MKTEF View Post
    All electricians that work with high current and amps do have this type of grease.
    They add it to the cables before crimping together to get good connection between the cable and crimped on shoes.
    Is also added to ends of cables when mounted into your fuseholder at home.

    Makes a bether connection without the need to tighten the hell out of the mounting bolts.
    Solves problems with overheat in the connection to the fuseholder.
    That's exactly the stuff I was speaking of. I actually looked at Nye Lubricants last night but I'm failing to find any information on these sites on where to get it locally. There's got to be a generic type company that sells this stuff at major stores.

    Do you think a place like Radio Shack would have this stuff, probably in small quantities to start with? A friend of mine who is an electrician is going to check with his parts house sometime this week to see if they have any.

    Thanks for the advice guys....I'm getting closer to the grease I seek.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Countryboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,276
    Found some . Its called Noalox and its made by a company called "Ideal". It's available at most hardware and supply houses.

    My buddy actually had some in his truck. Its main use is as an anti-oxidant, used on aluminum/aluminum and aluminum/copper connections but it is also supposed to be conductive.

    Thanks for the help!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Prince George BC
    Posts
    37

    Electrical conductive greases.

    The electrical wholsalers will have what you want. We used Chance on 138 Kv buss conections years ago. Isn't Penatrox to be used on 750V and down? Got some here somewhere might have to go read it if I was to find it?

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Hudson, FL
    Posts
    13
    www.mcmaster.com ?

    I don't know what you're doing, but have you considered soldering the connection? I'll be better than any grease (as long as it doesn't crack).

  11. #11
    Senior Member Countryboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    3,276
    Welcome to Heavy Equipment Forums Durette!

    Quote Originally Posted by Durette View Post
    www.mcmaster.com ?

    I don't know what you're doing, but have you considered soldering the connection? I'll be better than any grease (as long as it doesn't crack).
    The reverser has 4 rows of electrical contacts on a spindle that turns. 2 of the rows are for forward and 2 for reverse. The fact that it turns, to change the direction of current, rules out any type of soldering. The reverser tower was worn out. I was looking for a way to prolong it for a little while. It worked for a couple of more weeks then was replaced. This was on a locomotive by the way.

    Thanks for the input anyways.

  12. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Hudson, FL
    Posts
    13
    Quote Originally Posted by Countryboy View Post
    Welcome to Heavy Equipment Forums Durette!



    The reverser has 4 rows of electrical contacts on a spindle that turns. 2 of the rows are for forward and 2 for reverse. The fact that it turns, to change the direction of current, rules out any type of soldering. The reverser tower was worn out. I was looking for a way to prolong it for a little while. It worked for a couple of more weeks then was replaced. This was on a locomotive by the way.

    Thanks for the input anyways.
    Oxalic acid, sold as "barkeeper's friend" or "bon ami", will clean the hell out of contacts and remove oxidation.

  13. #13
    Site Sponsor
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    72
    At work some of the electrical contractors have used a product by Sanchem on bus-bars and other electrical connetions. I've not dealt with them or their product but just yahoo'd them and they have a web site: www.sanchem.com

    You would have to call them and see if you can by direct, or maybe they can give you a vendor in your area. Sounds like some good stuff.

    Please let me know what you find out, as it might be helpful for someone else in the future.

    Good luck,

    John

    johnsoils.com
    Last edited by Johnsoils; 08-06-2008 at 11:58 PM. Reason: Add to reply back with findings

  14. #14
    Senior Member stumpjumper83's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Port Allegany, pa
    Posts
    1,733
    Are you looking for dielectric greese, the stuff you put on trailer conections?

  15. #15
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    louisiana
    Posts
    26
    I would think welder repair places would have a little , also you could try woodmizer , the
    bandsaw maker , if I aint mistaken they use it on one of their sawmills so it will have an
    electrical connection all the way down the beam ..

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •