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Thread: The Ultimate Small Dozer

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by td25c View Post
    Hesston/Fiat made a small dozer with 540 rpm pto and 3 point hitch swamp rat.Pretty handy machine,first one I ever saw was at a Hesston tractor dealer in the early 1980's. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Montepulciano101.jpg

    Cab was also an option http://www.farmerservice.net/en/arti...olato/282.html


    Buddy of mine still has one but I think the engine has trouble.I may have to take a drive and check it out
    That thing looks awesome, if it was anything but a hesston it would probably be fantastic, but as soon as they put their name on it, it usually means it is pretty low budget, repair often.

  2. #17
    Junior Member Coleman396's Avatar
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    Here is my Struck. I have done some upgrades since these shots were taken. No more winch on the blade. I used a linear actuator on the blade so it now has down pressure. These machines are so handy for a hobby farmer I'm surprised there are not more of them around.
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    Run it until it breaks. Fix it until it runs.

  3. #18
    Junior Member Big Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coleman396 View Post
    Here is my Struck. I have done some upgrades since these shots were taken. No more winch on the blade. I used a linear actuator on the blade so it now has down pressure. These machines are so handy for a hobby farmer I'm surprised there are not more of them around.
    I just found these. Is that a kit built dozer? I'm thinking of buy one of them for myself for Christmas.

  4. #19
    Junior Member Coleman396's Avatar
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    That's up to you Dave. You can get them as a kit which you assemble or buy them ready to go from the factory. I will say that the service from Struck is excellent. They have a lot of long term employees that know their stuff right back to the older models like mine. It's nice to be able to call there and get proper service. These mini dozers are light weight but can do a helluva lot of work if you plan your work according to the limitations of the machine.
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    Run it until it breaks. Fix it until it runs.

  5. #20
    Junior Member Big Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coleman396 View Post
    That's up to you Dave. You can get them as a kit which you assemble or buy them ready to go from the factory. I will say that the service from Struck is excellent. They have a lot of long term employees that know their stuff right back to the older models like mine. It's nice to be able to call there and get proper service. These mini dozers are light weight but can do a helluva lot of work if you plan your work according to the limitations of the machine.
    I'm planning to go with the kit version because I think it would be fun to build and also make maintaining it much easier. It's really more of a toy for me to play with rather than something that I need to do work with. I'm retired on disability due to a couple of bouts with cancer and I miss working on and running heavy equipment. I was a factory worker and mainly operated forklift trucks and my hobby was restoring and maintaining historic railroad equipment. I've got three Wheelhorse garden tractors that I'm working on now, which are ok but that little dozer looks so neat and I've always wanted to run a crawler tracked vehicle.

    I see from your new photos that you've put the linear actuator on your blade. Is that an electrically driven screw jack? How is it working out for you?

    Thanks for your reply. :

  6. #21
    Junior Member Coleman396's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Dave View Post
    I'm planning to go with the kit version because I think it would be fun to build and also make maintaining it much easier. It's really more of a toy for me to play with rather than something that I need to do work with. I'm retired on disability due to a couple of bouts with cancer and I miss working on and running heavy equipment. I was a factory worker and mainly operated forklift trucks and my hobby was restoring and maintaining historic railroad equipment. I've got three Wheelhorse garden tractors that I'm working on now, which are ok but that little dozer looks so neat and I've always wanted to run a crawler tracked vehicle.

    I see from your new photos that you've put the linear actuator on your blade. Is that an electrically driven screw jack? How is it working out for you?

    Thanks for your reply. :
    Hi Dave. Yes, I put the actuator on and it makes it a whole different machine. Just a bit of down pressure makes a world of difference either when going ahead or when back blading. I thinks the key is to have enough room for the end of the actuator to move around when the blade tips up from one side to the other. If everything is built with really tight tolerances the end of the actuator will like break off. I designed it so the actuator can move a fair amount with binding up when the blade follows the contour of the terrain.

    Sure would like to see those wheel horses too as I love to tinker with the old G.T.'S.

    I actually plan to paint my dozer in the future and and will do it to match one of the Case 222 tractors I have here.
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    Run it until it breaks. Fix it until it runs.

  7. #22
    Junior Member Big Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coleman396 View Post
    Hi Dave. Yes, I put the actuator on and it makes it a whole different machine. Just a bit of down pressure makes a world of difference either when going ahead or when back blading. I thinks the key is to have enough room for the end of the actuator to move around when the blade tips up from one side to the other. If everything is built with really tight tolerances the end of the actuator will like break off. I designed it so the actuator can move a fair amount with binding up when the blade follows the contour of the terrain.

    Sure would like to see those wheel horses too as I love to tinker with the old G.T.'S.

    I actually plan to paint my dozer in the future and and will do it to match one of the Case 222 tractors I have here.
    I need to get some shots of my 'horses, but I don't have a digital camera yet. That's a beautiful little Case you have there. I fell in love with one like that back when I was a kid because I saw another kid trying to drive it over the mower deck at the Case dealership that was owned by a distant cousin. My Dad was shopping for a riding lawn mower at the time, but he didn't like the tractor style mowers and wouldn't buy it. We ended up with a rear engine Murray that beat the crap out of our push mower.

    As far as the actuator goes, it seems to me I've seen some sort of floating end for one of those that will do the trick for you. I'll have to let my brain chew on it for awhile since it sometimes takes me a bit to remember things.

  8. #23
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    If it's significantly for grins those are pretty neat. But keep in mind once that small, wheel machines can do the same jobs faster and with lower maintenance costs, noise and ground damage. Wheel machines also usually have the option of *practical* (three point) implement attachments and most are liquid cooled diesel engines. Your run of the mill mini excavator will do the same job as a micro dozer, plus is in excavator and significantly more durable and fuel efficient. It sounds like you are going in eyes open, I'm mostly saying this for the hundreds (?) of folks who will read the thread.

    With a ROPS and limb risers, those things are parade winners.

  9. #24
    Junior Member Big Dave's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by totalloser View Post
    If it's significantly for grins those are pretty neat. But keep in mind once that small, wheel machines can do the same jobs faster and with lower maintenance costs, noise and ground damage. Wheel machines also usually have the option of *practical* (three point) implement attachments and most are liquid cooled diesel engines. Your run of the mill mini excavator will do the same job as a micro dozer, plus is in excavator and significantly more durable and fuel efficient. It sounds like you are going in eyes open, I'm mostly saying this for the hundreds (?) of folks who will read the thread.

    With a ROPS and limb risers, those things are parade winners.
    That's a good point and I'm thinking of renting a mini to do a little work around the place, as well as see how well they work. The little dozer will be mainly a toy, other than snowplowing. Most of my equipment are really toys to me anyway. I'm just happy to still be around and able to play with these things. Thanks for your comment and I'm going to post some photos of other equipment I've operated on the Old Iron forum. Dave

  10. #25
    Member dillon45's Avatar
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    In reply to "swamp rat" many years ago i owned a International 340 GAS w/ a 6 way blade that had a 3pt. set up and it had down pressure. I can't remember if it had a PTO.

  11. #26
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  12. #27
    Senior Member fast_st's Avatar
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    Have a short track JD350, works great in tight spaces, needs some regrousering though.

  13. #28
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    Hi.... Newbie needs some useful advice....I've got my eye on a 1976 Case 450 that has been basically been rebuilt. Does this size Case equal a JD450? What should I look at to make sure machine is solid? Thanks

  14. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by 304thomas55 View Post
    Hi.... Newbie needs some useful advice....I've got my eye on a 1976 Case 450 that has been basically been rebuilt. Does this size Case equal a JD450? What should I look at to make sure machine is solid? Thanks
    A Case 450 is quite a bit smaller than a JD450. Closer to a JD350, if that. Do a search on Case 450 weight and I am pretty sure There is a thread here on it.
    ..Jay
    Landfill & Compost facility Operator
    Caterpillar D7R Waste Handler
    Caterpillar 950K Wheel loader

    TD7G Dresser - My Farm Dozer

  15. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by 304thomas55 View Post
    Hi.... Newbie needs some useful advice....I've got my eye on a 1976 Case 450 that has been basically been rebuilt. Does this size Case equal a JD450? What should I look at to make sure machine is solid? Thanks
    Take a look at this thread for weight info: http://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/...se-450B-Weight
    ..Jay
    Landfill & Compost facility Operator
    Caterpillar D7R Waste Handler
    Caterpillar 950K Wheel loader

    TD7G Dresser - My Farm Dozer

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