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Thread: Pic of bob cat tied down???

  1. #1
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    Pic of bob cat tied down???

    Got a call asking about moving a bobcat in the next couple weeks. I have the truck n trailer to do the job along with chain and binders. Never moved one of these though before so figured I'd ask for some pics. Are there places for the chain to go through?

    As for the size it's around a S205, not too old.

    Thanks, attached pic of my truck and trailer.



    http://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/...0&d=1173319237

  2. #2
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    yes there should be places for the chain to go thru. mine has a steel loop for the chain at all 4 corners.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member CascadeScaper's Avatar
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    You will need 2 chains only. Whatever binder you choose is fine, personal preference as long as they are rated for the weight you're hauling. If you don't have chains, 1/2" grade 70 transport chains will be sufficient. There should be 2 tie down loops at the back of the machine and 2 in the front. I usually use one chain for the back and run the chain through both loops and bind. For the front, I usually roll the bucket down flat and run a chain between the loader arms and the attachment plate. There's a natural wedge here on our 216, chain fits nicely. There are 2 loops in the front but you have to raise the loader arms to get to them and I don't like being under loader arms at all. Plus, it's tough to bind sometimes as there isn't much room between the tire and the loader arms, the chain hangs up on the tire at times so I'd rather do it the other way.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member nedly05's Avatar
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    1/2" chain for a bobcat would be plenty alright...5/16" grade 70 would probably be OK too!
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by 06bowtie_guy View Post
    Are there places for the chain to go through?

    As for the size it's around a S205, not too old.

    Thanks, attached pic of my truck and trailer.
    My 1-year old S175 has a single loop on the front in the middle of the machine, and loops on each of the rear corners. For the front, I take a chain up and over the corner of the bucket, through the loop on the frame, out the other side, and over the other corner of the bucket. After I place the chain, I pull the machine against the chain to tightern it.

    I cross-chain the rear using two chains, with a ratchet binder on each chain.

    If I remember, I'll snap a few pics tonight and post them.

    Joe

  6. #6
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    Perfect. Thanks for the info.

    I have 4 25' 3/8" grade 70 transport chains along with appropriate binders.

    Bought it here. http://www.slingchoker.com/pdf/CHAIN_.PDF
    The thing that lowers my WLL is the binders. They are WLL rated for 5400 lbs each. Still plenty though.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Noose's Avatar
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    I don't know about Ontario but about a month back my 'ol pal DOT stop us at zee scales, with one of our 12,000 lb. mulchers and informed us we requires a boomer on each corner, and the head was required to be chained down.
    I've personally seen a dually and gooseneck triaxle on it's side( due to ignorance) with a chain across the arms one across the reaer winch with a boomer on each and the head and machine were secure.
    Mostly the occifer said that the head not being chained down was the flag!
    Take it for what its worth !I've ran for years with two chains!

  8. #8
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    Anything with rubber tires is a sob to tie down because of bounce. Myself I would cross chain the back and a chain over the front or cross chain front and back. Oh ya if your using lever binders wire the handles thats all the RCMP knows to look for the rest of the time they have no clue.

  9. #9
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    Talking subject

    Good idea,I never thought about securing the handles on binders.Ky DOT I guess dont look at that as a safety issue.But the more I think about it the more I likes the idea.
    If you bought it,a truck driver brought it.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Lashlander's Avatar
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    I carry zip ties in the truck to secure binders when bounce is an issue.

  11. #11
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    subject

    Well I stuck my foot in my mouth,as much as I do it you would think I would be used to the taste.I use ratchet binders,not the lever type so I dont think I can secure em like that.Still a good idea though.
    If you bought it,a truck driver brought it.

  12. #12
    Member GaryKelley's Avatar
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    how to tie one down

    I wish there was a cut and dried answer, unfortunatley, there isn't. X-tieing usually works the best, and I almost always put a rubber snubber on the extra chain ends when its going to be a little sloppy, I use a combination of ratchet binders as well as lever binders. If there are 4 commercial cops giving you feedback (i.e citations) you are likely to get FOUR different answers. the last encounter I had, I was told that for ANY vehicle hauled on a atrailer (with the exception of car haulers specifially set up for hauling automobiles) that you are required to have four chains and four binders at each corner of the vehicle.

  13. #13
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    Hope this works, this is taken from a friends photobucket.

    http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z...0608300001.jpg

    This is how our drivers move skid steers. Now your also supposed to chain down any attachments, so the front one technically should have a chain over the forks. My question is, if the loader arms dont have forks or a bucket, do you have to chain the arms?

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