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Thread: pressure washing dozer tracks

  1. #1
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    pressure washing dozer tracks

    Hi guys,

    I am in the market for a new pressure washer. I want something that will make washing the mud out of dozer tracks quick and easy.

    I am thinking some kind of heavy pressure washer, but i am looking for other ideas.

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    I really want a pressure washer with a burner on it, the steam cuts old grease like a hot knife through butter. Depending on your budget, I would highly recommend one.
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    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    I would have to second CM's post, you can't go wrong with a Hot Water Pressure Washer. They will cut through the dirt and grease like butter.
    Last edited by SeaMac; 06-23-2012 at 05:42 PM.

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    I'll thierd^^^ but if your looking to quickly clean an u/c thats packed with mud a pressure washer IMO is going to let you down. Most likely you will end up using a shovel to remove the now very wet and sticky mud. Most washers iv'e tried don't seem to have enough flow to really cut threw and wash away heavy mud. But if your looking to just get that stubbern dirt that you cann't get with a shovel so you can work on something a pressure washer is the only way to got.

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    Yair . . . I would second the comments about hot water or steam cleaning for grease but when it comes to cleaning dozer and excavator tracks I find you need pressure but also some volume.

    For this it is hard to go past a two inch twin impeller "fire-fighter" with about a seven horsepower Honda or the likes.

    Cheers.

  6. #6
    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    I have to agree with buckfever on this one, sometimes the crud IS thicker than a pressure washer can handle. The best track cleaning shovel I have ever used is a Nupla Sewer Cleaning Spade, very compact and narrow enough to fit into the tight spaces of an undercarriage.
    Quote Originally Posted by buckfever View Post
    but if your looking to quickly clean an u/c thats packed with mud a pressure washer IMO is going to let you down. Most likely you will end up using a shovel to remove the now very wet and sticky mud.
    Last edited by SeaMac; 06-23-2012 at 06:13 PM.

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    If you go with a pressure washer make sure it has a high GPM rating, cant remember what brand our old one is, but i know it flows a lot of water. What your looking for you won't find down at the home center. I'll also tell you to go with the hot water option.

    Tom

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    Now if you have the opertunity get you self a pipe wrench and pull your machine infront of a firehydrant. That will be all the flow and pressure you need. Don't ask me how I know.

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    I use a 2 inch pacer transfer pump with honda 5hp,puts out up to 200 gpm . I have about 40 foot of fire hose with adj. nozzle just blast mud out, of course I get wet also but pressure washer would never get it.
    It's all that damn dog's fault

  10. #10
    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    Hey buckfever,

    I have a real hydrant wrench I could sell you. Don't ask me how I got it though.
    Quote Originally Posted by buckfever View Post
    Now if you have the opertunity get you self a pipe wrench and pull your machine infront of a firehydrant. That will be all the flow and pressure you need. Don't ask me how I know.

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    Well some time thoes hydrants can have a lot of pressure, static pressure of 80-90, and other times you may only get 40 or less, i have put out fires with just a hydrant and no hookup to the pumper, but unless the fire Capt. is your best buddy, i dont think you should mess with a hydrant. It just takes a few washings to
    get the job done, and pull out a scraper, and get wet.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Nige's Avatar
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    Name:  Trap Shoe.JPG
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Size:  13.9 KB

    If your track chains are getting packed with soft mud maybe you need some shoes with trapezoidal or "trap" holes in them. That way when the sprocket squeezes the mud into the chain it squeezes it straight out through the hole.
    Last edited by Nige; 06-24-2012 at 05:48 PM.
    I'd love to see things from your perspective but unfortunately....... I find it impossible to get my head that far up my a$$.

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    Yair . . . Nige. In our application the main problem on conventional (not hi-track) machines is mud building up and stopping the two top carrier rollers rotating. It's usualy okay while there is a bit of water around but once it dries up a bit it doesn't take long to wear some flats.

    Cheers.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Nige's Avatar
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    Okay - missed the point of the OP then. 100% agree that as soon as a carrier roller stops turning the problems start.

    IMO on non-highdrive machines or excavators equipped with carrier rollers giving the operator a track spade and making sure the feckers use them is a good start. It always makes me laugh watching our operators trying to clean out the tracks on a Hitachi EX3600 with a track spade ........!! Often we take pity on them and send the water truck over and hit it with the fire-fighting monitor.
    I'd love to see things from your perspective but unfortunately....... I find it impossible to get my head that far up my a$$.

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    Yair . . . Nige. This is going way O/T but are there any downsides to using the pads with the relief hole?

    Seems to me they would be good when working deep clay slots. It used to always bug me when the side of the slot collapsed onto the track. I reckon a nine would lose about fifty HP untill it cleared itself . . . I always preferred the angle blade (set straight) to allow a bit more room for slumps.

    Cheers.
    Last edited by Scrub Puller; 06-24-2012 at 08:32 PM.

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