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Thread: A new Iveco 4x4...

  1. #1
    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    A new Iveco 4x4...

    It is rumored since the purchase of Chrysler/Jeep by Fiat that Fiat owned Iveco trucks might be making their way back to the States. In the mid and late 80's Iveco was a popular truck in my area. Here's what they have to offer now, I hope they do come back. I have family and friends some in the industry in Italy and they tell me Iveco trucks are indestructable.

    Iveco Eurocargo 4x4

    Name:  Iveco 4x4 1.jpg
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    Name:  Iveco 4x4 2.jpg
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    Iveco Trakker

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    Name:  Iveco 8x8 1.jpg
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    Last edited by SeaMac; 06-18-2012 at 08:37 PM.
    SeaMac

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    That would make one hell of a service truck.

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    You have a wreck and you will be the first one there.

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    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    Yeah it would, or fuel/lube truck, water truck, truck to take the L'il Woman to dinner, truck to take the boat to the ramp. Yeah, it's a nice truck, they all are!
    Quote Originally Posted by buckfever View Post
    That would make one hell of a service truck.
    SeaMac

    "An Operator is what an Operator does, always safe, continuously honing their skills not to become, a once was"

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    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    Ahh c'mon now, just because it's a cabover design doesn't mean it's not safe. Honestly, I'd feel safer in an accident driving an Iveco than some or our so-called safe class 6,7 and 8 trucks. European's put a greater emphasis on safety than we do.
    Quote Originally Posted by jdm View Post
    You have a wreck and you will be the first one there.
    SeaMac

    "An Operator is what an Operator does, always safe, continuously honing their skills not to become, a once was"

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    What's the story with three of the four new trucks coming with tube type tires? And they're radials, so they'll run even hotter.Who'd want a new truck with those?

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    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    Huh? Sorry tireman, but I have absolutely no idea what you are referring too. I am by no means an expert when it comes to tires and if you mean "these" trucks it's only a rumor that they're coming. It does freak me out a little that you can actually see a tube inside the tire.
    Quote Originally Posted by tireman View Post
    What's the story with three of the four new trucks coming with tube type tires? And they're radials, so they'll run even hotter.Who'd want a new truck with those?
    SeaMac

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    Can't see inside the tire,although I can see the valve stems of inner tubes on the drive wheels of the single steer axle tractor(third one down). You can tell by the wheels.Flat rim-base is tube-type multi-piece.See the hump in the wheels of the drive tires on the bottom truck?That's called the "drop center". It's the dead give-away that they are tubeless.

  9. #9
    Senior Member SeaMac's Avatar
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    Well I'll be, I think I just learned something about rims and tires. Actually the rim with the "drop center" would've been the one I thought had a tube in it. Not yet an expert but damn if I ain't a little smarter. Thanks tireman and I am less freaked out now...
    Quote Originally Posted by tireman View Post
    Can't see inside the tire,although I can see the valve stems of inner tubes on the drive wheels of the single steer axle tractor(third one down). You can tell by the wheels.Flat rim-base is tube-type multi-piece.See the hump in the wheels of the drive tires on the bottom truck?That's called the "drop center". It's the dead give-away that they are tubeless.
    SeaMac

    "An Operator is what an Operator does, always safe, continuously honing their skills not to become, a once was"

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    Yair . . . tireman. Excuse me for showing my age and ignorance but wouldn't tube type tyres be better in the rough stuff when it's 52C in the water-bag and you're fixing them yourself?

    Cheers.

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    Well, I suppose if you wanna fight the tube being vulcanized to the inside of the tire, you'll be in for one hell of a workout.Tubeless tires are MUCH easier to service/change than tube-type.On outside duals(or even steers on aluminum wheel) the tire can be easily changed with the wheel still on the truck.

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    Yair . . . tireman. Gotcha mate. I have had nothing to do with the new technology but have heard tubless can be a PITA without lots of fast air for seating.

    Cheers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scrub Puller View Post
    Yair . . . tireman. Gotcha mate. I have had nothing to do with the new technology but have heard tubless can be a PITA without lots of fast air for seating.

    Cheers.
    They can be.Depends on the casing brand.Some brands-Michelin, Bridgestone,BFG to name a few- will take air every time-new or used.Some(namely the old Goodyear 100 and 200 series) will NEVER take air-new or used- without a blast or packing the beads with soap.If you're gonna be servicing your own tires you need to be properly equipped.A bucket of Murphy's and you are good to go,although it never hurts to have a blast tank.The key is to have more air entering the assembly than leaking out.In other words, valve core out and a wide open connection from your air line to the valve,namely a nipple that connects to your female quick-connect and screws onto the threads of the valve.DISCLAIMER-these should only be used to seat the beads and be removed in favor of a clip on air chuck to inflate the tire to proper PSI.

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    That all mainly applies to 22.5 and 24.5 tubeless truck tires.As for my past experience, every 19.5 tire(which is what appears to me to be on the above Iveco) I ever saw took air without issue.

  15. #15
    Senior Member d4c24a's Avatar
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    iveco

    i would certainly not have one by choice ,bit are always falling off in the cab , electrical gremlins , porous liners , diff casing has cracked

    its around 4-5 years old
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