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Thread: Curb and Gutter Machines

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Curb and Gutter Machines

    These machines still amaze me even though I have seen them operate many times. These guys are subcontractors that do all of our curb, gutter and inlet top work.

    It took 1 day to string the lines and grade the subbase, which they did earlier in the week. They started at 6:00am, poured about 3500 LF of curb and were loading the machine up on the lowboy at 12:30.
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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    A pic of the finished product. I knew better than to do this but don't take your dog with you to the jobsite when there is fresh poured curb on the ground.LOL
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    Senior Member PSDF350's Avatar
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    I like that, comes out nice.

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    Senior Member wrenchbender's Avatar
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    Well I've been around and worked on a lot of stuff but I ain't never got to see one of these in action before. Thanks for posting the pics BTW that is a lot of concrete in 6 & 1/2 hours no coffe break huh?
    Whatever you do make it count life's short enjoy it!

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wrenchbender View Post
    Well I've been around and worked on a lot of stuff but I ain't never got to see one of these in action before. Thanks for posting the pics BTW that is a lot of concrete in 6 & 1/2 hours no coffe break huh?
    Hope you get to see one in action it's pretty darn neat. I have never put a stop watch on it to see how many LF per minute they can do but it's fast. Next pour we have I will find out.

    Thanks PSDF350.

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    That's great stuff CM1995 real interesting... I don't know much about paving... any idea who invented that process and is that technique replacing preformed concrete curbing?

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wulf View Post
    That's great stuff CM1995 real interesting... I don't know much about paving... any idea who invented that process and is that technique replacing preformed concrete curbing?
    Thanks Wulf
    I don't know who invented it but the machine they were using was made by Miller Formless. Probably Gomaco is the largest manufacturer of slip form machines.

    Are you refering to precast curb or hand formed curb? We will hand form small curb jobs like commercial buildings and small parking lots. As far as precast curbs I don't know if I have ever seen them used around these parts, although I have seen them in Europe. On subdivision jobs the slip form method is far superior to anything else. Down here in the south we don't have to worry about frost heave so the curb can be poured continuous with expansion joints troweled in. Is it any different in the colder climates to the north?
    Last edited by CM1995; 04-07-2007 at 07:15 PM.

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    Those self-propelled curb mules are sweet. The one I used to run we had to set paver forms and it would ride on them. It would still slipform the curb itself though. Some curb mules have a trimmer on the front before the slipform. Just leave the grade a little high and it augers the extra material to the side. Saves a lot of time and work fine grading. We always just cut the expansion joints with a softcut saw.

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    Senior Member Dozerboy's Avatar
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    IIRC its a bad day if they don't get in 3,000' a day. What odd is here a lot of crub is done by hand and IMO looks like crap compared to what a machine does.

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pushcat View Post
    Some curb mules have a trimmer on the front before the slipform. Just leave the grade a little high and it augers the extra material to the side. Saves a lot of time and work fine grading.
    This particular machine has a hydraulic trimmer and auger mounted in front of the slip form. If you look at the close up pic you can see the auger.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dozerboy View Post
    What odd is here a lot of crub is done by hand and IMO looks like crap compared to what a machine does.
    I agree the machine does such a better looking job but sometimes you can't get the guys with the machine to fit into your schedule for a small job and we have to do the old fashioned way.

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    Founder Steve Frazier's Avatar
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    I used to work on a crew that did asphalt curbing. That job sucked!! We had to put these forms in the rear corners of the truck hauling the curb mix so the mix would flow out the center tailgate chute. They were welded up steel forms with 3/4 plywood screwed to them, very heavy! It always seemed to be my job to get them in my truck.

    Then the mix had to be transferred by wheelbarrow to the curbing machine at a pace fast enough so the machine would not run out of material. What a miserable job that was!!!

    Up north here we don't often see gutters and curbs cast as a unit. Curbs are most often formed and they extend about 2' into the ground as poured concrete. Then asphalt pavement is installed from curb to curb, no concrete gutter.

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Frazier View Post
    I used to work on a crew that did asphalt curbing. That job sucked!! We had to put these forms in the rear corners of the truck hauling the curb mix so the mix would flow out the center tailgate chute. They were welded up steel forms with 3/4 plywood screwed to them, very heavy! It always seemed to be my job to get them in my truck.

    Then the mix had to be transferred by wheelbarrow to the curbing machine at a pace fast enough so the machine would not run out of material. What a miserable job that was!!!

    Up north here we don't often see gutters and curbs cast as a unit. Curbs are most often formed and they extend about 2' into the ground as poured concrete. Then asphalt pavement is installed from curb to curb, no concrete gutter.
    Hot asphalt and a wheelbarrow are two things I try to avoid at all costs - much less put together!

    Interesting about the 2' deep curb. So these are usually hand formed? Do you dig out a trench and form up? Sorry for all the questions- I just curious.

    What is a typical road section for you guys? We usually have a 6:2:1. 6" dense grade base, 2" asphalt binder, 1" asphalt wear course.

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    Super Moderator Orchard Ex's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Frazier View Post
    I used to work on a crew that did asphalt curbing. That job sucked!! We had to put these forms in the rear corners of the truck hauling the curb mix so the mix would flow out the center tailgate chute. They were welded up steel forms with 3/4 plywood screwed to them, very heavy! It always seemed to be my job to get them in my truck.

    Then the mix had to be transferred by wheelbarrow to the curbing machine at a pace fast enough so the machine would not run out of material. What a miserable job that was!!!
    One company I worked for put a salt auger on the back of the truck without the spinner assembly. We augered the asphalt out of the salt drop hole on the driver side into a mini version of a concrete chute and into the curb machine. Still needed some shoveling in the truck bed but it was much better than the hand method. I agree that asphalt curbing was not much fun.

  14. #14
    Founder Steve Frazier's Avatar
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    The curbs are trenched, and most companies who do this work have curb forms made up. They are wooden forms with 3/4" rebar bent in an inverted U over the top of them to hold the proper distance between front and rear of the curb. On curved sections they use a pliable wood to form the curve. When the curbs have hardened, they "wash" the curbs with a cement wash for cosmetic appearance.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Dozerboy's Avatar
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    We do a lot of stand alone curb like Steve talked about, but its 15" most of the time without bar. We cut grade just as if it was C&G roads all very with the material generally 6 on 4. I have never seen this crub done but by hand.

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