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Thread: Devcon Titanium Putty

  1. #1
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    Devcon Titanium Putty

    Has anybody used Devcon Titanium Putty or something similar to fix worn splines? I purchased a used 5' tiller this past winter at an auction. Now, after checking it over, I see why it was up for sale. The splines on the clutch hub and input shaft have an extreme amount of wear. I would guess at least 50-60% gone. I read somewhere that John Deere made a repair kit for this type of problem on some of their older dozers (2010 and 420) and it was a repackaged version of this epoxy. It seems like a really high load area to be using an epoxy. The tiller dealer wants $750 for a new shaft and $500 for the hub so it has me searching for a cheaper alternative as this tiller is just for working up the garden once a year. The Devcon product isn't cheap either at $100 but I'd be willing to give it a try if I someone's had good luck with it in such an application. Another thought was just to weld the hub solid to the shaft and run it until it fails and go from there if and when the time comes. Thoughts anybody?

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    Some people in these parts use something called Aerodite (not sure of spelling) and saved a lot of worn out parts on cane farm equipment. That is what I would try.

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    Super Moderator willie59's Avatar
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    Are you referring to a hub on a splined shaft that doesn't have to move? Sort of slipped onto shaft and then locked down? If so, it's likely a good repair compound would work well for that application. Years ago, I repaired a Deere straight mast forklift, where steering link arm met king pin shaft on steer tire. Shaft and link arm were splined connection, and seriously worn. I used some form of Devcon, for the life of me can't recall which one, fitted the arm on shaft with it, gave it ample cure time, connection was still tight 2 yrs later.
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    Yes Willie59, It's just like the yoke for the u-joint on the differential on a car where it slides onto a splined shaft and then held on with a big nut in the center. Only in this case the yoke looks a little different because it has a stack of adjustable spring loaded discs that make up a slip clutch for the pto shaft. That big nut in the center was loose and allowed the hub/yoke to work back and forth on the shaft.
    Iron@Dirt, I've done a little looking on google for the Aerodite product. I'm not finding very much info.

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    Super Moderator willie59's Avatar
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    In that case chroniekon, don't know that an epoxy would work, sounds like the hub has to be able to move fore and aft on the spline shaft reacting against the spring washers. And epoxy, or any other hardening compound would inhibit this movement.
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  6. #6
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    Sorry, I guess I didn't word it quite right. The nut is supposed to be tight, really tight. The nut was loose when I did my initial inspection and I'm pretty sure that's what caused the damage by allowing the hub to 'hammer' back and forth rotationally on the shaft. I'm thinking a picture may be useful. I'll see if I can get one on tomorrow. Thanks for your help.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chroniekon View Post
    Has anybody used Devcon Titanium Putty or something similar to fix worn splines? I purchased a used 5' tiller this past winter at an auction. Now, after checking it over, I see why it was up for sale. The splines on the clutch hub and input shaft have an extreme amount of wear. I would guess at least 50-60% gone. I read somewhere that John Deere made a repair kit for this type of problem on some of their older dozers (2010 and 420) and it was a repackaged version of this epoxy. It seems like a really high load area to be using an epoxy. The tiller dealer wants $750 for a new shaft and $500 for the hub so it has me searching for a cheaper alternative as this tiller is just for working up the garden once a year. The Devcon product isn't cheap either at $100 but I'd be willing to give it a try if I someone's had good luck with it in such an application. Another thought was just to weld the hub solid to the shaft and run it until it fails and go from there if and when the time comes. Thoughts anybody?
    I have used Devcon on some Military trucks to hold a adapter on the rear axles of a 2-1/2 truck for the CTIS system it holds pretty well but when spread thin it will crack. we found some cheaper brands that worked just as well but we dont have that model of trucks any longer and i have CRS and cant rember what brand it was

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    Well I couldn't get the pictures to turn out good enough to show anything meaningful. I've ordered the Devcon and am going to give it a try. I'll let you know how it works.

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    I have used a LOXEAL paste for similar applications on agricultural machines and it worked well if the gap isnt too big.I cant remember the number but I keep a bottle and could check. It cost 20 euro. I know Loctite make a dose of products for such applications.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chroniekon View Post
    Has anybody used Devcon Titanium Putty or something similar to fix worn splines? I purchased a used 5' tiller this past winter at an auction. Now, after checking it over, I see why it was up for sale. The splines on the clutch hub and input shaft have an extreme amount of wear. I would guess at least 50-60% gone. I read somewhere that John Deere made a repair kit for this type of problem on some of their older dozers (2010 and 420) and it was a repackaged version of this epoxy. It seems like a really high load area to be using an epoxy. The tiller dealer wants $750 for a new shaft and $500 for the hub so it has me searching for a cheaper alternative as this tiller is just for working up the garden once a year. The Devcon product isn't cheap either at $100 but I'd be willing to give it a try if I someone's had good luck with it in such an application. Another thought was just to weld the hub solid to the shaft and run it until it fails and go from there if and when the time comes. Thoughts anybody?
    Did a similar repair on a splined drive coupling for the PTO of a John Deere F935 diesel front mower. I don't remember if I used Devcon Titanium or their Plastic Steel putty, but it would have been one of the two as that is what I keep on hand. In this application, the coupling was fixed and did not need to slide. I ended up selling the mower to a friend who said the first thing he was going to do to it was repair this correctly, as it would never last. Anyway, that was seven years ago and he has never touched it. He is probably mowing with it right now.

  11. #11
    Senior Member typ4's Avatar
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    devcon makes amazing products, if you can pump it in thru a hole and fill all the gaps it will last a long time, the other option on the splines if they are coarse is to weld with ni or stainless rod and grind, heck even 7018 or hardwire lasts forever, did a 10 spline shaft on a tiller years ago and its still going

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    That's very encouraging typ4, and a good idea about pumping some in through a hole. I've ordered the stuff and it should be here next week, so I haven't seen what consistency it is. Any ideas on what to use to pump something like that in with?

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    Take a look at Loctite 660 Quickmetal. It's made to fill spaces like that and set up hard. I've fixed some heavy and abused stuff with it and love it.

  14. #14
    Senior Member typ4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chroniekon View Post
    That's very encouraging typ4, and a good idea about pumping some in through a hole. I've ordered the stuff and it should be here next week, so I haven't seen what consistency it is. Any ideas on what to use to pump something like that in with?
    I used to have a mini grease gun that I would use, then clean it with acetone or laquer thinner, get about 3 uses, but it fixed the problem so was figured in the cost.

    and that quickmetal is darn good also, couldnt remember the name.

  15. #15
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    Araldite will work aswell, I have repaired a few splines that way. Make sure you use the high strength stuff (takes 3 days to set)

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