Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Diamond Z grinding trim ends

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    colorado
    Posts
    110

    Diamond Z grinding trim ends


  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    colorado
    Posts
    110
    Is the forestry section that shy. Tell me good bad ugly. Tell me about that sqeaky roller on the stacking conveyer. If you're looking I know that keyboard and mouse work. I may have a new video tomorrow if I can remember the camera. I love a good Sunday grind. The fastest wood chip to playground material grind I know of. Stay tuned.

  3. #3
    Senior Member hvy 1ton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Lawrence, KS
    Posts
    864
    Being a know-nothing about grinding, i can't add anything too useful. That said i do recognize the finished product from years ago.
    Life summed up by refrigerator magnets:
    HE WHO DIES WITH THE MOST TOYS WINS
    OLD RANCHERS NEVER DIE,
    THEY JUST QUIT HORSIN AROUND

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    colorado
    Posts
    110
    As promised


  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    ct
    Posts
    76
    It sure can push that regrind out,but most can. After having owned and maintained several grinders I still prefer a horizontal feed for that last minute opportunity to prevent a multi thousand dollar bad day grinding hastily gathered muni-waste.
    1964 CAT 922-A still operates perfectly
    2001 Hyundai HL-760 loader
    2000 Hyundai HL-730 loader
    1998 Schaeff SK-851 loader
    1997 Hyundai Robex 200 lc
    1994 Kobelco SK 200
    A fleet of KW tractors,dump trailers and triaxles

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    colorado
    Posts
    110
    Quote Originally Posted by TCS View Post
    It sure can push that regrind out,but most can.
    To my knowledge this is the fastest grinder in the world in this material for the horsepower. That's not the most impressive part in my mind. We have figured out how to keep shrinkage to a minimum. In fact in most instances we actually expand the material. In my experience I have never seen or heard of such a thing. As far as damage control we have modified this grinder to the hilt in more ways than just efficiency. Past experience includes hitting a 3"x12"x19" log press out of a de-barker. We feared the worst and even went so far as to mic the mill. Everything checked. Lost 2 or 3 tips and the down time to inspect and repair. I'm available to consult how to best utilize your grinder to maximum potential. Let me warn you I'm not cheap and neither are the parts

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •