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Thread: Best Driveway material for hills

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    Best Driveway material for hills

    I've been asked to give a quote on re-doing a camp road approximately 600 700 ft.
    it's very hill-ly/steep 50 too 60 degrees or so. Sub-grade is solid granite. Whats on it now is rotten granite and it's washing away/ruts 5-8inch deep. I was thinking whatever is put on it would have to have a steep center to edge grade maybe 2" to every 1' over an 8' drive. Whats the best material?


    Thank you
    David
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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Grade it out with crusher run and pour 4-6" of concrete depending on what type of traffic uses the road. That would be a lasting solution.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CM1995 View Post
    Grade it out with crusher run and pour 4-6" of concrete depending on what type of traffic uses the road. That would be a lasting solution.
    He live's in Maine cm....lol.... water gets cold there, and slippery.... would have to put some radical grooves in it for braking,,, and then the snowplow would hook them. I guess rap (recycled asphalt) would be my material of choice... but still 60 degrees would take its toll for sure.

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandpa View Post
    He live's in Maine cm....lol.... water gets cold there, and slippery.....
    Hmm, note to self - see location of member before posting.

    Question - What would be the difference in a rough broom finish concrete and RAP in a slippery, frozen type situation? Seems to me it wouldn't make that much of a difference but I have no experience with the conditions you guys up north deal with.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CM1995 View Post
    Hmm, note to self - see location of member before posting.

    Question - What would be the difference in a rough broom finish concrete and RAP in a slippery, frozen type situation? Seems to me it wouldn't make that much of a difference but I have no experience with the conditions you guys up north deal with.
    Well if its real thick ice on it CM (like the kind that coated willie's ford last winter, ha ha) it wouldn't make much difference. But just normal winter when you put the brakes on you can pull up some rocks from the rap to slow you, but then with today's anti skid brakes your in for a ride that make your southern rectal muscle pucker....ef.ef..ha ha.

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    Super Moderator CM1995's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grandpa View Post
    but then with today's anti skid brakes your in for a ride that make your southern rectal muscle pucker....ef.ef..ha ha.
    Yeah had one of those one time but it was on very slick wet clay. It was a temp. road on a project the loggers were using to carry out loads. It was the middle of summer, everything was dry as a bone and an afternoon T-storm came up and dumped 1/2". I take off down the road, clay slicker than owl snot and well...that is why I have a Ranch Hand front bumper - cheaper than a factory replacement and tough as nails.
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    Quote Originally Posted by dsgsr View Post
    I've been asked to give a quote on re-doing a camp road approximately 600 700 ft.
    it's very hill-ly/steep 50 too 60 degrees or so. Sub-grade is solid granite. Whats on it now is rotten granite and it's washing away/ruts 5-8inch deep. I was thinking whatever is put on it would have to have a steep center to edge grade maybe 2" to every 1' over an 8' drive. Whats the best material?


    Thank you

    If the subgrade is solid rock,why just not remove all of the ''base'' material there now as long as you can get a decent plane on her.Anytime you have ledge rock as a subgrade,nothing granular will hold up in a gullywasher except blacktop or concrete,especially on a steep hil
    Last edited by CM1995; 08-23-2011 at 06:39 AM. Reason: fixed quote tags
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    Wouldn't 22a be good enough? Maybe compacted?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dsgsr View Post
    it's very hill-ly/steep 50 too 60 degrees or so.
    Wow, are you sure about this?....that's somewhere between 110% and 133%. Are you sure it's not 50 to 60%? Not that it really matters here, but I've never seen a grade like that and I'm curious.
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    Alco you may be right, I'm not that familiar with grades. The sub grade is rotten granite with granite boulders embedded, so you either cover them or blast them. Hot top and cement are too expensive for options. The only thing I can think of is a very stony 2" minus with a lot of binder, somthing that would pack like cement and maybe grade twice a yr. No plowing to worry about (summer camp).


    David
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    Senior Member stock's Avatar
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    What about lean mix topping something like a 5 newton concrete ?
    Stock

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    Quote Originally Posted by stock View Post
    What about lean mix topping something like a 5 newton concrete ?
    Interesting note Stock. Soil cement, do you mix that in a pug mill?

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    There are a couple of ways of which a plug mill is one, a draw back might be contamination of biodegradable material. mostly here when we did it we used tippers hauling from a batching plant. I was laid with a paver on motorway projects 12" deep on top of compacted 3/4 down crushed road base. I have also laid it on smaller projects with similar criteria to this one but domestic usage, and of course we don't get the extremes of weather that Maine has a a norm.
    It can be laid with a grader or excavator,compacted with a roller but must be left for a week to reach full load bearing strength. O' don't forget the crack inducers or expansion cuts every 6m or 20'.............
    Stock

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    Quote Originally Posted by stock View Post
    There are a couple of ways of which a plug mill is one, a draw back might be contamination of biodegradable material. mostly here when we did it we used tippers hauling from a batching plant. I was laid with a paver on motorway projects 12" deep on top of compacted 3/4 down crushed road base. I have also laid it on smaller projects with similar criteria to this one but domestic usage, and of course we don't get the extremes of weather that Maine has a a norm.
    It can be laid with a grader or excavator,compacted with a roller but must be left for a week to reach full load bearing strength. O' don't forget the crack inducers or expansion cuts every 6m or 20'.............
    Do you know the percentage of cement that is used in the mix?

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    If blacktop is cost prohibitive there dsgsr,you can always go with blacktop millings if there's a plant by you that offers it. Tell that camp's owner to dig a little deeper into their cookie jar because it's going to be that old scenarioo it cheaply,it will look good for awhile[read that until the next gullywasher comes],then redo,again and again---OR--do it once,invest WISELY,and put down some type of hard[blacktop,concrete,millings] surface that rain won't scour and undermine.I would also put down a HEAVY crown and have 1.5'' crushed stone on each side for drainage.
    Just remember when the old lady laughs at your expense for trying to sell what she thinks is a worthless piece of garbage"There is an a** for every toilet seat ever made"
    Formerly Skull-Finder-{found the skull to the famous mastodon in Hyde Park,NY in 2000

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