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View Full Version : How deep can drain tile be buried?



PhilDirt
02-06-2013, 10:22 PM
I'm filling a large area, several acres. I'd like to install pipe to temporarily manage runoff water coming from a neighboring property while I fill an adjacent area. It will eventually have about 20 feet of fill on top of it. When the project is finished, both ends will be covered and it will be abandoned, but it needs to work for 2 or 3 years. Is drain tile strong enough to stand up to that much fill on top of it?

Dickjr.
02-06-2013, 10:53 PM
Like ADS slit pipe 4" ? I would think if properly grillaged , the tile should be fine , if its n12 buried in clean soil it should be fine. Are you picking up ground water or piping water from one side to the other?

Construct'O
02-06-2013, 11:14 PM
With 20 ft of fill i would be using the dual wall pipe!I would go 8" to 12" just in case.4" isn't the strongest in your situration.Doesn't take much of a mistake(large clud to make it a 2" or less pipe.Bigger the pipe better change of still having a usable flow ,just in case of a mistake.

Might want to take a water tank and run some water down it after you get backfilled before you start with the big fill.I would at less try getting 2ft of good backfill around and above the pipe before getting to carried away with the big fill.

Take sometime and bed and backfill over the pipe if your wanting it to work properly.Maybe even use some sand.20 ft of dirt is some serious weight.Good luck

Tinkerer
02-07-2013, 06:48 AM
If you are wanting to get rid of runoff from a adjoining property could you establish a ditch along it instead ? If you could do that, it would just be a matter of raising the ditch elevation as your fill rises. Is there continuous runoff or just from snow melt and rain. Just curious about the water source.

PhilDirt
02-07-2013, 09:58 AM
The neighboring runoff is already diverted, but this area is about 3 acres and steeply sloping and accumulates quite a bit of rain and snow melt runoff which currently can drain into another field. My best approach to fill is from the deep end which would trap water like a lake in the bottom until it's all filled. Even building a road to the shallow end would trap water. If I can drain it while it's being filled it will allow me to take the topsoil off to stockpile for reuse as I go along rather than have to take it off all at once, which PA DEP rules don't allow. There is quite a bit to be stripped but there there isn't time to get it all done and we need to start filling ASAP.

Would PVC pipe work? That would sure be more expensive and a lot more work gluing it all together.

Randy88
02-19-2013, 07:11 PM
Ditto on what constructo said, I'd not use pvc for that purpose, or depth, especially if you fill as you go, the vibration over time will cause problems with pvc we've found, actually we've removed a lot of pvc and put back in dual walled where vibration was an issue. As for hooking them up, order bell and cup dual walled, use a cordless screw gun and screw the bell and cup together as you go, its also more forgiving on installation of dual walled verses pvc. When the projects done, put caps on both ends before covering them up, screw them on and your done, also use a good intake for the upper end, not just an open hole to keep the line clean and open till the projects done. Best of luck