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Grinderminder71
07-06-2004, 08:45 AM
I have a little jd 440 crawler, it has a detroit 2 cyl dsl engine. I started it one evening to smash some metal w/ the bucket and as soon as it lit the r's went nuts, I droped the throttle to the off spot and nothing changed. It stated sounding somewhat serious and i had to think quick so I took off my new leater riding jacket and opened the air cleaner and shoved it down. between that and running the bucket all the way up and back and holding it there i finally got it to die.
Since then I turned it over w the throttle all the down and it was gonna lite so I back off and dont quite know what to do.

will_gurt
07-06-2004, 09:13 PM
Worn or disconnected throttle linkage could cause this. If it has a cable for linkage, that could be seized and holding at WOT.

will_gurt
08-09-2004, 02:30 PM
Have you foud anything out further about this wil detroit?

Gene Nolen
08-10-2004, 07:10 AM
Most likely you have a stuck injector. This will hold the entire rack in the position the injector is stuck in. Very common in Detroit. Could be the governor itself also holding the rack open.They can run wild for other reasons but I would check these things first.

chuck jacobs
12-31-2009, 08:35 PM
i have a 353 detroit in my bantam dragline. while digging in some blue clay,digging a pond,i almost stalled the engine, darn thing started running wide open in reverse.had to jump out.run to the back an flip the lever shutting off air to the blower.when i restarted it, it smoked for about fifteen minuets,then it ran perfect

willie59
12-31-2009, 08:56 PM
Yep, bad idea to stall a Detroit. That's prime time to make one run backwards. :yup

Willis Bushogin
12-31-2009, 09:15 PM
Most likely you have a stuck injector. This will hold the entire rack in the position the injector is stuck in. Very common in Detroit. Could be the governor itself also holding the rack open.They can run wild for other reasons but I would check these things first.

This is good advise, remove the valve cover and see if the rack is stuck/froze/not free (its the round rod/pipe about 1" in dia, with all the thingees attached to it) The rod has two linkages that fit into the injector fuel rods. If the rack is stiff/froze find out what injector has it locked up, just look at the movement on the injector plunger and the stuck one wont be moving. Locate the injector and take a metal drift/stock/etc and rest it on top of the thingee that the rocker arm presses down. Just tap the drift with a small hammer and the injector should free up, it may take several times. This works 80% of the time, this is not a repair, its a temporary fix to get you out of a bad situation. The injector will have to be changed, you can pour all the WD40 on it as you want, but it wont help. Let us know what you find out and we will help you remove and install a new one. Just dont turn too many screws and bolts, unless you know how to set the rack back up.

I have seen the flyweights in the governor go bad and the bushing/bearing freeze up, but normally its the injector

Keep us posted

monster truck
12-31-2009, 10:40 PM
Another reason some diesel engines will run away is an oil leak into the intake. Some of the cat truck engines have been known to do the same thing when the oil seal in the turbo begins to leak on the intake side. I am not too familier with the detroit blower setups but I would guess the same thing is possible. If an injector were stuck it should still have shut down when you closed the throttle as the shut off would stop fuel from getting to said injector. My grandma's 3406 cat did the same thing to her while she was driving down the road a few years ago and the only way she could stop was to hit nuetral, the engine blew before she even came to a stop. As you found out cutting off the air supply is the only way you can shut it down as the oil becomes the fuel source and it cant be stopped. As I said I am not familier with detroits but I would inspect any seal between oil and the intake. Good luck and let us know how it turns out.

excavator
01-01-2010, 12:40 AM
It has been a long time since I've worked on one, but if I remember right, when you shutdown a Detroit the rack goes to full throttle. On the older models, if an injector sticks and you start the motor it will go to full throttle. The old versions had 2 screws on each injector lever and the linkage was pretty much solid. Newer models went to a spring loaded lever with only 1 screw and you should be able to over-ride a stuck injector. I've always told people if they have a detroit that has set for much more than 6 months, better pull the valve cover and check. It's a pain but better than blowing it up.

Iron Horse
01-01-2010, 01:30 AM
i have a 353 detroit in my bantam dragline. while digging in some blue clay,digging a pond,i almost stalled the engine, darn thing started running wide open in reverse.had to jump out.run to the back an flip the lever shutting off air to the blower.when i restarted it, it smoked for about fifteen minuets,then it ran perfect

I can't quite get my head around this , if the engine was running in reverse . Wouldn't the blower also be running backwards and exhausting through the intake/air filter ? How would closing the over rev safety flap stop the engine ? Wouldn't the pressurized air , force the flap open ? Not arguing , just wondering .

RonG
01-01-2010, 03:20 AM
That is what happens,the exhaust exits through the air cleaner and the exhaust pipe becomes the intake.
It can make a mess if it runs long enough through the old oil bath air cleaners.
Any diesel engine is subject to running in reverse,not just Detroits.Just think,we have 18 speeds in reverse..LOL.Ron G

Phil
01-01-2010, 05:29 AM
I have read that blower seals can get leaking, especially after using the air flap to shut the engine down. Also read that one must use a straight grade oil(#30 or #40) with the correct designation, and that water in the fuel can cause injectors to stick. There is also an air box drain that should be checked to make sure it's open.

I have not had any experience with troubleshooting on these engines, but have rebuilt a few, they are quite interesting to work on. Attached a picture of a 4-53 engine block showing the air box opening. Phil

busdrivernine
01-01-2010, 12:26 PM
I have read that blower seals can get leaking, especially after using the air flap to shut the engine down. Also read that one must use a straight grade oil(#30 or #40) with the correct designation, and that water in the fuel can cause injectors to stick. There is also an air box drain that should be checked to make sure it's open.

I have not had any experience with troubleshooting on these engines, but have rebuilt a few, they are quite interesting to work on. Attached a picture of a 4-53 engine block showing the air box opening. Phil

That is one screwed up block :eek:guess somebody thought it would run better if they painted it cat yellow:D

xcavator120
01-01-2010, 12:28 PM
I like the topic title What makes a Detroit runaway?

Easy the sound of a Cummins, coming down the road..:D

Hardline
01-01-2010, 12:56 PM
LOL I went to a large air compressor school years ago. The focused on the Detriot and Mercedes engines that came in the machine. In the middle of the class the instructor stated that there was no such thing as a runaway engine! There were quite a few older seasoned mechanics in the class and as you could imagine that statement made quite a stir. After a few minutes of discussion from the mechanics the instructed laughed and said that there were over speeding engines which caused ran away mechanics! That got quite a laugh!

Autocar
01-01-2010, 01:08 PM
I am no expert but wouldn't a broken governor spring let it run away also ?

TimHay
01-01-2010, 01:56 PM
What makes a detroit run away?

I would say he has bad parents. No body ever blames the parents any more

Koehringman
01-01-2010, 02:47 PM
One time I heard about a guy that had a Detroit run-off on him and he shut it down spraying a fire extinguiser into the air intake. ** It must have caught it's oil when it took off **

A sad thing to see, but shows a Detroit on a full throttle death. Go to YouTube, Type in Detroit Diesel Meltdown in the search bar.
Don't know if this engine had cooling water to it, It looked it caught it's oil though.

Willis Bushogin
01-01-2010, 04:21 PM
One time I heard about a guy that had a Detroit run-off on him and he shut it down spraying a fire extinguiser into the air intake. ** It must have caught it's oil when it took off **

A sad thing to see, but shows a Detroit on a full throttle death. Go to YouTube, Type in Detroit Diesel Meltdown in the search bar.
Don't know if this engine had cooling water to it, It looked it caught it's oil though.

Trust me the old 71 and 53 engines would and will run away. I have been there and done that. The first time it happened to me, I worked at Cat and I rebuilt a 4-71 detroit on a generator, the weekend mechanic put the governor on and set the governor and the rack and said it was ready for the dyno testing. I put in in the dyno and hit the starter and away it went, it was turning past 3000 rpm when I looked at it (it was a 1900 rpm engine) , then it caught a second wind and started climbing. This all happened in less than a minute and Im trying to get the outside air intake off, so I can choke it off. I did get it cut off, but the second wind was it picking up oil out of the base and burning it. Dont ask me how but I was always told that this was the reason for the second wind and possible boom next. Me and my helper had to take a nerve pill after that one, come to find out the other mechanic had set the governor wrong and I think the flyweights were on the wrong side of the shaft stop. This was when I started putting vise grips on the rack, on a first time start up.
I did have one other time on a marine engine 6-71. I was in the milatary and the night shift put a new governor on and something must have been wrong with it, engine cranked up and started past 3000 and I was doing this and that and nothing helped, so I grabbed a fire ext and unloaded it in the blower screen. It did stop it, but we had to take the engine out and rebuild it. I wish I had something to put over the intake screen, but there was nothing

OK my finger is getting sore from telling war stories, if you didnt remember anything I said, remember Detroits 71& 53 series will run a way. These are different animals that we see now a days, so mostly it takes an old timer like me to tell these stories. I do like this engines, they will run forever, regardless of how you treat them. I have one in an old Drott 40 excavator, I use for a yard machine, you cant kill it

Good Luck and Happy New Year to everyone

Phil
01-01-2010, 07:04 PM
Willis, I really enjoying your stories, keep them coming:).

I was working in a pit once, and got to know the chap running one of the Koehring 505 cable shovels. He was strange one. When I saw the Harper Diesel truck there one day, I asked what happened to the 6-71. Apparently the fuel truck filled the tank with gasoline instead. With excitement he described how she "barked like a wild dog" and had all kinds of power, before her life ended a few minutes later. Phil

steponmebbbboom
01-06-2010, 11:29 PM
some clarifications; on a two-cylinder detroit with one injector rack seized in the wideopen position, a sprung rack wont really help with shutting down the engine as you're only cutting power to half the engine. also, a detroit engine cannot run away in reverse, the timing is so far off you will barely get an idle out of it. which is why blocking the intake might actually stop it successfully. and thirdly, pulling the stop lever does not cut off fuel flow to the injectors, injectors are fed from a gear pump that supplies fuel to a common rail and jumper lines to the injectors, and pressure is maintained at 50psi through a restrictive orifice in the return elbow coming off the head.
detroits can overspeed for a number of reasons, stuck injector racks being one, plugged airbox drains being another, improperly set or damaged governors most commonly, and leaking blower shaft seals. if you have the means to stop an overspeeding engine with a large CO2 extinguisher, it is the least harmful method as closing the emergency stop flapper or plugging the intake will create enough vacuum to suck the seals out of the blower shaft. be aware the engine moves a lot of air at those RPMs and you do not want to get body parts stuck in the intake when this happens.
if you have a small CO2 extinguisher either deadhead the hydraulics slam it into top gear and dump the clutch or close the flapper before the RPMs pick up again. you have only seconds to save the engine before the block and crank are destroyed.
if you have a machine with a detroit take this opportunity to verify that you have an emergency stop flapper installed on the blower intake, that can be easily tripped from the operator's position so that safe control of the machine can be quickly regained in the event of a runaway. and make sure the operator is drilled and drilled again on its proper use so it's not forgotten in a panic situation. D

steponmebbbboom
01-06-2010, 11:33 PM
also do NOT discharge a dry chemical extinguisher of any size into the intake of an engine unless you want to destroy it.

Phil
01-07-2010, 06:27 AM
Good post, welcome to the forum Steponme:drinkup
I've noticed whenever the name Detroit Diesel comes up, in any forum, the response is a good one. I worked on one once in a Dynahoe backhoe, a 3-71, as I recall. There is an interest in putting these engines in pick-ups, including the 3-53 Gamma-goat engine that had the aluminum block. I don't believe there was a more adaptable series of engines ever made. Phil:)

Koehringman
01-07-2010, 09:41 AM
Yeah, Those classic screamin' Detroits. I love em' Got a 4-71 in my Koehring.:D

steponmebbbboom
01-07-2010, 10:12 AM
i am actually looking for a 3-53T for a jeep project i'm building but id prefer not to use the aluminum gamma goat engine because of the FWhsg pattern no PTO plates and the corrosion problems of an aluminum block. thanks for the welcome. D

tripper_174
01-07-2010, 10:25 AM
Keep us posted on the jeep project step...should be very interesting!

steponmebbbboom
01-07-2010, 11:11 AM
im not the first one to do it,
YouTube - wheelin' thru a wash #10 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNKiKlu6hdY)
ronnie passmore's jeep has a 3-53NA with T19 trans and dana 300 case, 14 rear and 60 front with 44" swampers. i came up with the idea on my own and met up with him later, i like detroits and would like to run it on SVO on the street rather than build it for serious offroad like he has. D

Komatsu 150
01-10-2010, 03:16 PM
I would just like to mention another way Detroits would run away in the real old days. A machine with an oil bath air cleaner would try to go up or down a steep grade and oil from an over full air air cleaner would slop over and get sucked into the engine. The air cleaner usually had too much oil not from being over filled when servicing but because someone was too lazy to clean it and the dirt built up in the bottom and raised the oil level.

chuck jacobs
08-24-2010, 10:11 PM
detroits will run away .as i said ,i almost stalled my dragline,it started running in reverse wide open.the cable drums turning backwards also,causing a rats nest in the cable.i dont know how to explain it any other way.

mitch504
08-25-2010, 12:51 AM
We rebuilt a 6-71 and instead of the steel plate we usually kept at hand, my brother set a piece of 3/4 marine plywood on the radiator. When we started it for the first time it ran away, he grabbed the piece of plywood and dropped it on the intake. That old girl sucked the middle out of the plywood and ate it without slowing down. We had to scramble around to find a piece of steel and by that time we had to pull the engine back down and start over.

Mikefromcny
08-25-2010, 02:27 AM
Think thats a screwed up looking block? Look up a Volkswagon VR6.

atgreene
08-26-2010, 02:25 PM
I've never had a Detroit run away on me, yet. Couldn't you grab a fuel filter and either unscrew it or shut off the fuel/crack a fuel intake to shut it down? Unless of course it's getting oil from elsewhere.

I've had a few 3208's run in reverse, weird feeling to see exhaust pour from the intakes.:eek:

powerjoke
08-26-2010, 06:32 PM
I've actually seen a diesel engine consume its own oil and blow itself up, so it's not always fuel related.

Pj

monkey
08-26-2010, 07:19 PM
wow, great reads :notworthy

I have a back up generator with a 6-71 in it, ya'll got me scared to walkin the contianer when it's running :eek:

Komatsu 150
08-26-2010, 09:50 PM
Well it's not that it happened a lot it's just when it did it was really memorable.

stinkycat
08-26-2010, 10:29 PM
In the mid 60's we were testing Donaldson air cleaners on electro haul trucks with 12V149 Detroit Diesels with 4 turbos and 2 roots. the engine was under full load and the Donaldson Tech was blocking off the air inlet and slipped and covered the inlet completely the turbos over sped and the roots blowers rotors were sucked into the valley the engine started to take off the shut down. Both blowers were junk all 4 turbo over sped and were reduced to junk. That was a wild time.

Cat Wrench
08-27-2010, 09:12 AM
what makes a detroit run away?

An approaching Cat will make a Detroit run away in shame!

I got the privilege to see a detroit over speed and have a major mechanical "malfunction" that created a new exit port for oil in the side of the block at a shop I was working in. I believe it was a 8V-92. I will never forget that sound. It had a very high pitch at the end. It seemed like the noise stopped for a couple of moments before I heard the loud boom, kind of like a pause, it was really cool.

upbrakie
08-28-2010, 02:42 AM
I've been around alot of Detroit's but haven't had the priviledge to see one overspeed yet. We have 3 operable machines and 2 that aren't with 3-53's, one with a 2-53 and one with a 4-71. They have been fairly reliable engines with few problems but fnding parts for them is becoming more and more difficult.

Andfor starting engines backwards, I don't know how I did it, but I managed to fire the diesel in an old pony start cat D47U backwards. Oil started pouring out the air breather. Luckily, I was able to open the compression release seconds after it fired to kill it. Since then, the engine has run like a top!

Zed
08-28-2010, 05:18 AM
The older 2 stroke detroits had an injector rack that was adjusted by 2 screws, and as said way back at the start of this post, if an injector seized then the whole lot stuck in that position, if it was in full fuel, then you had an engine overspeeding.
Because of this fault, they changed the rack to a single screw adjuster, and a spring system so if one injector stuck, then all the rest could return to a no fuel position.
If you have an older 2 stroke with the 2 screw rack, you can change it to the new style and avoid a catastophe.
Other ways to overspeed them are to have a nitwit do a tune up for you and not read the book. Or get same nitwit to do some repairs and put rack control rod in the wrong way, seen that happen, instant death of 16V92.
Also seen a 16V149 overspeed and had to shut it down myself, which scared the crap outa me hitting the blower emergency shutdown flaps with the poor thing screaming. That was a mechanical fault in yeild link and we got it going again after replacing all the heads. The valve train doesn't like high RPM and broke valve bridge posts off everywhere, but other than that it was ok.
Whenever we started an engine after major work we'd leave the intake off turbo and have the service manual right there to jam on the turbo.

Remember the golden rule "RTFB". Read The F**king Book.

johnnypixon
09-02-2010, 12:33 AM
There is great wisdom in the words of steponmebbbboom. Today I fired up my hein-werner c12 hd excavator and the 4-53 detroit diesel suddenly flew into full throttle runaway. I had the knowledge to do the right thing (jump out of the cab, run through the mud to the other side of the machine, climb up on the swing platform over all the hoses etc. and hit the emergency shutoff) but it happened so fast-- I paniced, jumped out of the cab and I ran. That terrifying roar chased me into the woods. I hid behind a giant oak tree waiting for the inevitable BOOM. Then by the grace of god the old beast calmed down and began to pur like a kitten. I'm not sure if it's an injector or the govener but I'm sure that I won't start it again until I connect the emergency shutoff on the engine to a makeshift lever in the cab.

JDOFMEMI
09-02-2010, 01:28 AM
Great old detroit stories.

I remember one of the mechanics telling me of an 8V-71 that ran away. He tripped the blower doors shut, but it already had a head of steam built up. It was spinning so hard it swallowed the blower doors, and proceeded to run to destruction.

I also remember a 6V-71 on the rear of a TS-24 when the trans stuck in first gear. On the return haul road, they were getting 6th gear wide open on that job. I was driving the haul road when I seen a strange piece of debris lying there. I stopped and picked it up, and discovered it was what was left of a connecting rod. Further up the road, I picked up 2 more of them. Then I followed the oil trail to the dead scraper. It had 2 new windows on one side of the block, and one on the other. 3 rods left completely, and a 4th was hanging. When we pulled it out, you could reach all the way through.

busman
01-27-2012, 07:06 PM
Hello all, Busman here, newbie to this forum
Have an Austral Tourmaster ex touring coach converting to a motorhome with a DD 6V92 in the rear
We have a hydroponic farm (no not that sort, real food) and one of the workers did some work on the vehicle. One of the things he did was replace the shutdown cable (which was showing signs of age) with an electric solenoid, and also fitted one at the same time for fast idle. Of course these sit on top of the governer box anld I strongly suspect he has been playing with both the Jake switch adjustment and the governer screw in the rear of the box. Can't ask him, he isn't here anymore, probably good thing as you will agree as you read on................

Getting near the end of this build, yesterday we replaced coolant, power steer oil, fuel filters, oil filter and did an oil change

Turned the key and boom, she was running at 20,000 rpm (at least sounded like it). Got to the back prety quickly (yups the panic set in and I didn't think about switching the fuel shutdown switch at the driving position) First thought was to manually pull the fuel shutoff solenoid back to shut the fuel off. I couldn't move it (or was that the panic level was increasing and I was pushing in the wrong direction, dunno ?) At this stage haven't even tried activating it to see if it works (was checked and working, but not with motor running after install)

First thought was to starve the thing of fuel so unscrewed the primary filter, faltered then back up to full revs again, so unscrewed the secondary as well and it eventually died. The silence was unbloody belivable !!

I would like to ask any more experienced members of this forum for their advice on where to go from here. I need to know correct positioning of both of these as I am not sure if they have been touched before I even look at things like the shutdown solenoid. (this was checked when installed and was working but not checked with motor running)

Also need to know if Detroits need bleeding at the injectors if they have run dry of fuel

As you may appreciate something like this dents your confidence in your equipment and yourself, would not recommend it to those with weak tickers

Any thoughts ?

Willis Bushogin
01-27-2012, 09:03 PM
Brings back old nightmares
Yes to the question about bleeding the injectors, just crack the outlet line on each injector and crank over until you see good fuel, then go to the next one beside it and on and on
Im not real familiar, with the governor on your setup, but Im sure it has a buffer screw, if your guy turned it all the way it, it could cause it to do this
If you have a stuck injector, it will cause this, check to see if the fuel rack is free, when you manually rotate it
I have never worked on a Detroit with jake brake, but I can tell you you need someone that knows what they are doing on this engine. Its not many young guys out there with 92 & 71 experience, look for and old timer, like me and Atco Willie

willie59
01-27-2012, 09:38 PM
Yep, panic is a good way to describe that busman. And like Willis said, a number of things can cause that, and it's not possible for us to guess just what the cause is as we have no way of knowing what former wrench bender tinkered with, and if he monkeyed around with the governor adjustments, oh boy, fun getting everything back in order. Think I would do what Willis suggested, remove valve covers and check for free movement of fuel racks, would also consider disconnecting the installed shut down and high idle solenoids until you get things sorted out. Lastly, before you attempt to fire it off again, clamp some vise grips on rack control arm under valve cover. Don't start from driver seat 40 ft ahead of you, rig up a remote starter button to connect to starter, then you can crank it right there at engine, control engine speed and shutdown with vise grip on control arm, until you get things sorted out. Hope that helps.

Zed
01-29-2012, 06:29 AM
The jake brake switch on this engine is actully in the buffer screw, it hangs out the back of Governor housing, and has a full thread on it with lock nut. When adjusting the racks on these you need the buffer screw wound all the way out. The buffer is the last thing you adjust after everything else on a Detroit. it basically stops the engine hunting (smooths out idle). There should be 2 levers on governor housing, one is shutoff, the other should be throttle. Disconnect the solenoid and cable from shutoff and throttle, so you can move them backward/forwards by hand. Remove rocker covers. Now while looking at the racks, you should be able to pull the shutoff lever and the racks should move OUT, away from injectors. If they dont do this, there is something wrong! They should move a long way, maybe 1/4" from inside of head casting. If you don't know how far out the no fuel position is for the injectors, remove the governor to rack rod pin, at front of rack, then there should be 2 mounting bolts on either end of rack, you need a 1/4" socket, 1/4" drive to get these bolts out, dont drop them down drain holes into sump... After you remove the rack, move the injector control in and out. out is no fuel, in is full fuel. While you are looking under rocker cover, check all your rocker gear, valve bridges, for any damage.
It sounds like this needs a full tune up to get it sorted, but if this guy screwed the buffer in too far, the thing will rev and the shutoff wont do anything.
The buffer will overide the governor, so if its wound too far in, the governor wont pull it back. We used to check for full fuel on the dyno by using a tool that screwed into where the buffer was, and we could "dead rack" the injectors by pushing it all the way in, to make sure the governor was giving it full fuel.
You don't need to bleed injectors, in fact this is a bad idea because it can lead to fuel leaks at the injector lines, which will cause fuel dilution in the engine. These things will start on just a sniff of fuel, and all you have to do is take the fuel line off the secondary fuel filter and pump fuel through the heads. older engines have flared end fuel lines, newer engines have fuel lines with orings. There is a special tool for tensioning flared fuel lines.
There should be a tag on the governor housing that tells you what it is, yours should be a LS (limiting speed) for that application. Limiting speed governors only govern low idle and high idle.
Let us know how you go with this, if you need more help I can try to get hold of procedure for tune up.
I used to work for Detroit Diesel Australia, and have a fair bit of experience with the old 2 strokes.

busman
02-04-2012, 05:14 PM
Hello guys and thanks for your replies, I have learnt a lot since this incident.
My suspicions have been proven correct, the buffer screw (with the Jake switch) was screwed in further than it should be as was the screw at the rear of the govenor box (which I think is to hold the racks slightly forward for easier starting?). Buggered if I know why he played with these, his brief was to mount 2 solenoids on top of the govenor box, 1 for shutdown, the other for fast idle.
Have a mate who has a similar coach (only couple of months apart) so I rang him and got him to measure the thread sticking past the locknut for each of the two. For instance, on the rear screw, I believe this is the one that did the deed from the above post, his had 9mm sticking out, mine had 2mm. So, just as a rough guide we had a starting place.
Backed off both screws to similar (bit further actually) amounts of free thread and hit the button, after filling both filters with dieso.
Spun over about 10 revs and boom, away she went, didn't have to bleed.
Funny thing is, motor is now quieter and sounds "sweeter" than before. Oil pressure is also slightly higher. Ran it until was hot and now have suspicion the temp sender is dud so new one on the way. I am mystified why the oil pressure is slightly higher, it was the first oil change so maybe was just the new oil ? or maybe there is a whole hea

busman
02-04-2012, 05:21 PM
Ooops sent off above without finishing my post.

Seems was not runaway, but more wrong settings, at that level of noise and panic not much difference !

What I was about to say was, maybe there is a heap of crap scooped off the internals, that has filled the filter, maybe that accounts for the slight oil pressuer increase ?

Will wait till I have new sender unit and do a couple of oil/filter changes back to back to be certain. Have also sourced a tune procedure, as it is "sweet" at the moment will wait till unit is rego'd then find myself an old time DD mech to do first one while I look over his shoulder. Pity you are in Indonesia Jed !!

Cheers