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View Full Version : Smaller used dozers.



Jeff D.
08-28-2006, 10:21 PM
I've little/no experience with dozers, but am interested in finding a used one, with a max operating weight of around 16-18k lbs.(The largest I could carry on my trailer.)

Other than the obvious concerns about undercarriage, and other mechanical wear, what would you look for in a used dozer? What to stay away from?
What is the smallest size that will still push over smaller trees (4-6"at base)?

I'm looking for specific good older models/brands and perhaps the problematic models too avoid.

Right now I've been leaning towards an older JD450, but am open to suggestions.

6-way a must?
Hydrostat good or bad?
Is 8800 lbs too small for real work?
Any good models that seem to sell for less than the rest?

I don't mind if it's old(suprise:rolleyes: ) as long as it's still serviceable, and of a design that is as easy too work on as possible for a dozer. That second part scares me about the 450. I've been told the clutches are buried pretty deep in the case, when repair is needed.

Thanks!:notworthy

JBL
08-28-2006, 11:03 PM
The straight 450 and 450B used a dry disc steering clutch system. Once they become oil soaked you lose steering. There is an inspection cover on the top of the final drive below the seat and a drain plug on the bottom of the final that allows you to drain water and if the differential seal is leaking, oil from the clutch compartment. You can look down through the inspection cover and if the brake band is covered in oil and grease it is about time for repair. I believe the C model is when they went to a wet disc steering clutch system so my guess is that would be alot less headaches.

Dozerboy
08-29-2006, 10:10 PM
I would get a JD our D3 tranny is been nothing but problems.

Jeff D.
08-29-2006, 10:37 PM
thanks guys for the info.:yup

Not alot of replies though. I would've thought more people would've had an opinion on dozers.:beatsme

Could someone explain the terms "shuttle" and "reverser" when they are talking about the trannies?

Is a reverser simply a lever that will put the dozer in reverse in any gear?

If you guys don't help me I'll just go out and buy something like this:http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_531338_531338

And when I find out it can't push a turd off a sidewalk, I'll blame everyone but JBL and Dozerboy.:bouncegri

No.......but some opinions from you guys as what would be big enough for smaller landscaping/driveways/land clearing jobs would be great.

Orchard, you have an Komatsu D20, correct? Will it push over a 4" tree? What's that weigh, about 9k? I looked at one, but it didn't have any english on it anywhere, so I figured this particular one was a grey market machine, and left it alone. He was asking $11k.

I just don't know how big I'll need, but don't want too big. I couldn't move a 550JD or a D6. Would a Komatsu D20 or D21 or JD350 be big enough?

Thanks!

CascadeScaper
08-29-2006, 10:57 PM
I'd get an older JD 350, like an early 80's or late 70's machine. Parts should still be available and those machines are fairly compact, should be easy for you to move with your current truck/trailer combo. Plus, they're classics!

digger242j
08-29-2006, 11:09 PM
And when I find out it can't push a turd off a sidewalk, I'll blame everyone but JBL and Dozerboy.

Even though a good operator makes all the difference... :yup


Could someone explain the terms "shuttle" and "reverser" when they are talking about the trannies?

In my experience, "shuttle" means a forward/reverse only transmission. Fer instance, the case backhoes I've spent so much time on, have forward and reverse on one handle--the shuttle, and a straight 4 speed tranny behind that--shifter sticks up through the floor between your legs, and has four gears, but no reverse. I'm sure the same definition applies to any machine with a "shuttle". As far as a reverser, it sounds like the same thing, but it's not a name I'm familair with.


you have an Komatsu D20, correct? Will it push over a 4" tree?

I think most self respecting skid loaders would push over a 4" tree, unless you just absolutely couldn't get in the right spot to do it. You just might have to dig around the roots a little first...

woberlin
08-29-2006, 11:26 PM
I have a cat d3b and absolutely love it. It will do alot of work, and certainly everything you mentioned that you need a dozer to do. I still find it to be a little light when trying to cut hard rocky soil, or push uphill. Plenty of power, just not enough weight. Unless your doing strictly landscaping, I would stay away from the #10,000 & #12,000 dozers. A Case or JD 450 is about as small as I would consider.

Mike J
08-30-2006, 01:25 AM
I think those 10,000 lb dozers would be a bit light. I recently got an allis chalmers hd7 running. I think it weighs around 16k and i was pushing a little dirt with it and i don't think I would want a dozer that was only 10,000 lbs, unless it was just going to be used for grading lawns and other light jobs.

I think you would be able to haul a deere 550 ok. The new ones are about 17k so that would be in in your 16 to 18k range.

xkvator
08-30-2006, 06:46 AM
never ran the dozer versions...but i really liked the 555 over the 450 with the extra weight/power. i liked the 555 trans, too
...but if you're doing driveways/landscaping, i think the 450 would be ok

we just cleared an acre...a Bobcat 773 w/grouser tracks pushed over everything up to about 8"...i cut down, then dug all the larger trees with a 580K

rino1494
08-30-2006, 07:56 PM
Nothing beats old dozers like Case dozers :thumbsup

Orchard Ex
08-30-2006, 08:40 PM
Not alot of replies though. I would've thought more people would've had an opinion on dozers.:beatsme
Sorry for the delay, somebody covered my sidewalk in turds and I had to push 'em off with the D-20. Ran over my survey stakes too... :mad: Neighbor said it looked like an older red international....


Could someone explain the terms "shuttle" and "reverser" when they are talking about the trannies?

Like what digger said. Mostly I've seen shuttle and reverser to mean the same. However, I've also seen on some older stuff "Shuttle" meant that reverse and a working forward gear were in line with each other. Meaning that you reached down and "shuttled" back and forth. (now that's some good marketing spin!) I've also heard people call power shift dozers reversers. You almost have to ask to be sure.


If you guys don't help me I'll just go out and buy something like this:http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product_6970_531338_531338
I looked at one of those in person once! Had a crazy pedal steer with both pedals on the same foot! IIRC also had bolts in the tracks instead of regular pins/bushings. Whole thing looked homemade. Guy was selling it with like 60 hrs. on the clock. Maybe you want one of these? http://www.struckcorp.com/index.html



Orchard, you have an Komatsu D20, correct? Will it push over a 4" tree? What's that weigh, about 9k? I looked at one, but it didn't have any english on it anywhere, so I figured this particular one was a grey market machine, and left it alone. He was asking $11k.

I have a D20A-6. Yeah small trees (4-8") are no problem. Depends on the site conditions and tree species. Mine has the canopy instead of full 4 post ROPS and it weighs about 8k. The D21 (powershift) is a little heavier and a 4 post ROPS adds nearly a ton. Most of them are grey market I think. Mine has asian and english writing on the inside of the side cover. Only asian in other spots. Komatsu has all the parts readily available. Other aftermarket suppliers have been easy too for cutting edges, tracks, rollers. Filters I can get at NAPA etc. I think the P models have a 1' wider blade and pyramid/swamper pads.
BTW - 6 way is a must. I started out with a Case D310E with a 4 way blade. Don't know how I did without the tilt function.
Since you already have a backhoe you could do like xkavator said and dig out anything that's too big for a small dozer.

Squizzy246B
08-30-2006, 09:09 PM
Stop encouraging him...we know what he is capable of in a truck:eek: ...just think what he'll be like in a Dozer:rolleyes:

For older small dozers I think the Case machines are pretty good...couple working round here never give any trouble.

jazak
08-30-2006, 09:13 PM
So whats wrong with CAT D3s? I haven't seen may people using them, mostly D4s, and lots of people don't like them but I haven't heard why, so whats up?

Ford LT-9000
08-30-2006, 09:19 PM
I usually don't promote Cat but when it comes to Dozers they know their chit :yup

Jeff D.
08-30-2006, 09:21 PM
Sorry for the delay, somebody covered my sidewalk in turds and I had to push 'em off with the D-20.What kind of sicko would do something like that!?:eek: :rolleyes:

Like what digger said......He's referred too as "His Diggerness" now, or "The Dig-miester"

I think you would be able to haul a deere 550 ok.
:yup For some reason I thought they were 20k lbs, but I guess not.


Thanks Orchard, and everyone for the replies. I looked a four dozers today. A JD350, Komatsu D-31, Case 850, and a Massy Fergeson ??.

I liked the D-31, but too much money.

I'm going to test the JD350 out friday afternoon. It has 2900 hrs, undercarriage looked good too me. He said you could steer it with your pinky. Was clean looking. Asking $7500

I'll try it out in a pit and see how it does, and decide from there. Maybe I can get him too come down some??

iceberg210
08-30-2006, 09:47 PM
I'm suprised no one has mentioned IH.

I operate a D3 and a International Harvester TD6. The TD6 is a great peice of machinery but as IH didn't build to many of them especially later on the one I would look at is the TD7. Its a very capable machine and lots of them were made by both IH and later Dresser. It weighs in at about 13-15k pounds depending on year and options.

Jeff D.
08-30-2006, 10:03 PM
I haven't run across too many IH dozers yet. I did look at one smaller one, a TD4 maybe, but it was a gas job. Looked like it had an Farmall H motor in it.

He wanted $7k for it. It was nice shape, but pretty old, and small for 7 g's.

Different areas must have different dominant brands. There's alot of John Deere and Allis Chalmers around here, when looking at the older stuff.

Jeff D.
08-30-2006, 10:20 PM
Ooops, forgot too welcome you too the forum also, Iceberg210!!:thumbsup

Ford LT-9000
08-30-2006, 11:26 PM
I was going to meantion International there isn't many around they are a good machine I have ran a small track loader I forget what model number it weighs around 18,000lbs.

One thing about the International they have the same steering system and transmission as Caterpillar. They also have a decellerator like a Cat machine too.

Jeff D.
08-31-2006, 12:03 AM
I'd forgottton about one other International crawler I'd looked at. I don't remember the model #, but it had a loader and a backhoe on it. It wouldn't turn when it got hot, though. I asked a mechanic about it, and he said stay away, too expensive to fix the steering problem.:beatsme

The Case 850 dozer sure looked good, but after asking about the D-31 price, I knew the Case would be more, and it may have been too heavy for my trailer anyways.

Orchard Ex
08-31-2006, 09:11 AM
undercarriage looked good too me.
You may already have done this - when I was looking I called a track shop and got the measurements for the rollers/rail/bushings for each of the machines I was getting serious about. I also got prices for replacement rollers, pin/bushing jobs, all new chain etc.
Some of them were marked "recent new undercarriage" but really only got new sprockets and maybe bushings on 0% rails. Some were marked 75% undercarriage but were less than 10% left. When I measured I knew what I was really getting and could negotiate price better. Some of the guys with the small dozers had no idea how worn there machine was.

tylermckee
08-31-2006, 09:22 AM
I ran an older d-2something a few weeks ago in a dump site we have where i was just pushing material and while it couldnt puch its way out of a paper bag it would have been a great little machine for grading around houses and such. Around here when you see an older dover its probably gonna be a CAT, and im going to assume thats for a reason.

tylermckee
08-31-2006, 09:24 AM
I dont know if you already said, but what kind budget do you have in mind?

Jeff D.
08-31-2006, 10:47 AM
You may already have done this - when I was looking I called a track shop and got the measurements for the rollers/rail/bushings for each of the machines I was getting serious about. I also got prices for replacement rollers, pin/bushing jobs, all new chain etc.
That's a good idea. I'm planning on bringing a friend who's had a dozer before too inspect the undercarriage for me too, on the 350.

I dont know if you already said, but what kind budget do you have in mind?I'm looking at used dozers priced $5-10k. Might go more if it's worth it.

jazak
08-31-2006, 09:18 PM
Have you tried www.Catused.com or www.equipmenttraderonline.com/?


http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/5/4/85308854.htm
http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/9/3/84979093.htm
http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/5/7/81450357.htm
http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/4/4/84476044.htm

These units are a little small in my opinion but thats all that cam e up for $15000 if you made it $20K you could get something bigger and nicer but everyone's got a budget.:crying :crying Hope you find something.:thumbsup

Here are some around $20K

http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/2/0/85252120.htm
http://adcachehttp://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/6/8/85356968.htm. equipmenttraderonline.com/9/1/9/85518619.htm
http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/7/9/84490479.htm (real nice)
http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/1/4/82446714.htm
http://adcache.equipmenttraderonline.com/9/8/7/84241887.htm

Jeff D.
08-31-2006, 10:26 PM
......you could get something bigger and nicer but everyone's got a budget.:crying :crying Hope you find something.:thumbsup
Yup, that's the thing, staying within a budget.:yup

I'd like to buy the biggest, baddest, newest dozer available, but don't mind working on an older one if parts are still available. The smartest thing would be just to hire one, or rent, but I like to tinker on equipment(almost a hobby) and have something I can use when I'm done.(I need a winter project too :wink2 )

I'll test drive the JD350 tomorrow, and see if it'll be big enough for what I have in mind. If not I'll continue looking.

I can find alot of dozers less than $10k, I'm just looking for one that's not worn out, like most are at those prices. That's the hard part. If I'm expecting the impossible at the price range I'm looking at, I'll have to up my price I guess. When I find one, I'll buy all the manuals, learn the thing inside and out, and replace whatevers needed to have a good working machine. I just don't want to buy something that needs a $5000 whatchamathingy replaced, and then still have a machine that's gotton everything else worn out.(a money pit)

I've heard alot of dozers can be just that, too!:rolleyes:

Thanks again everyone for input.:thumbsup I'll post back again after I look at the John Deere.

Jeff D.
08-31-2006, 10:58 PM
I did research today on the John Deere 350. This is the model I'm looking at, taken from John Deeres own website :http://www.deere.com/en_US/cfd/construction/deere_const/media/non_current_pdfs/noncurrent_dozers/350w6300.pdf

I was really impressed with their online parts breakdown of the dozer. I searched it to see if parts were still available, which they were.

It also listed a "reverser" as an option. It reverses any of the standard gears. So if I put the tranny in reverse, and engaged the reverser, would I end up going forward again??:bouncegri

itsgottobegreen
09-01-2006, 12:48 AM
I
It also listed a "reverser" as an option. It reverses any of the standard gears. So if I put the tranny in reverse, and engaged the reverser, would I end up going forward again??:bouncegri

If you did that to these older JD crawlers it would move. Just don't try to push or two anything. Because the reverse gear would explode, and take the rest of the tranny with it.

dayexco
09-01-2006, 01:15 AM
you try
www.contractorshotline.com
www.machinerytrader.com
www.rockanddirt.com
?

Jeff D.
09-01-2006, 10:02 PM
I'll post back again after I look at the John Deere.
And so I shall.

The 350 was in nice shape. Newer sprockets, pins,rollers.(guessing 85-90%) The shoes were worn though, maybe 40%:beatsme
The reverser was rebuilt at some point in the recent past.
One small leak, right cylinder.
Started excellent cold, no blue.
Steered very easily.
Manuel 6 way.
Paints old, but good.
Completely dry underneith.:thumbsup
Nothing mechanically that concerns me.
Doesn't push as well as I thought it might. Like some have said, it's just not heavy enough, I guess. Enough power, tracks will spin, just not enough weight to force the cutting edge into the ground very deep.

I don't think it would've ripped a 4" tree out of the ground either, unless it was shot off a carrier deck directly at the tree.:bouncegri Maybe if you drove over the tree with the blade up, and broke it off it might, but pushing/ripping it out of the ground, roots and all, with the blade down.:spaz I'd really have been suprise. (I didn't want to try it out on the guys trees)

Am I wrong in thinking that's how you move trees with a dozer? By hitting it with the blade down, and yanking it out of the ground by shear force? Maybe I've the wrong idea/technique in mind. I'd always yanked them out by chain/tractor or dug them out backhoe/skid-steer. I wanted something that'll do a 4" tree in one swipe.

Dayexco, I have been looking through the "machinery trader" to find ballpark prices, I'll check the others out. Thanks!

Tomorrow I'm going on a road trip to see/test a JD450B.

Dozerboy
09-01-2006, 10:15 PM
To get trees down sometimes you have to rip up the root around the tree, like cutting a V ditch on all 4 sides. You could push over some big trees with a 350 but it isn't going to be easy or fast. There are tricks to running smaller dozers I would try and fine one with rippers though.

Wulf
09-01-2006, 10:25 PM
Doesn't push as well as I thought it might. Like some have said, it's just not heavy enough, I guess. Enough power, tracks will spin, just not enough weight to force the cutting edge into the ground very deep

Jeff, in my experience the grousers being worn will really affect the pushing power, depending on how much penetration they will get and how wide they are. If the tracks are spinning then power is being wasted and power is normally matched to the machine weight.
Not sure what type of blade and push group it had but make sure that the blade cutting edge is angled properly. If the angle is wrong it will push but won't cut (bit like pushing a chisel at the wrong angle) and it won't roll the material.

Jeff D.
09-01-2006, 10:49 PM
Well, I haven't ruled out the 350 yet. It could be like you say Wulf, and some adjustments/practice/new grousers could make all the difference. It's the first dozer I've operated so...........

Dozerboy, the only other dozer I've watch clearing land was an HD-6 Allis I was contemplating buying. He had a cutting edge with teeth welded to it(rippers?). He'd hook the tree at the base with the teeth and "Bye-bye tree:waving " (poof-all-gone). Most of those were probobly 6" diameter or less, but it walked right through them with ease.

That's what I had in mind, but with slightly smaller trees.:thumbsup Maybe the rippers would make all the difference on the 350?

Squizzy246B
09-01-2006, 11:35 PM
Hey Jeff, there was a time here when you hardly saw a dozer without a tree pusher on it. I've seen a werll operated D8 push over some massive trees with just a pusher bar:

Have a look at Deas posts:

http://www.heavyequipmentforums.com/Forum/showthread.php?t=707&page=2

Jeff D.
09-01-2006, 11:47 PM
Cool :thumbsup I'd read that post before , but forgot about it. Thanks.
I've seen a werll operated.......
Was that "well", or does that mean something else? Something Australians say?

I haven't seen Deas on here in a long time.:beatsme I always enjoyed his post too. I hope everythings ok.

RonG
09-02-2006, 05:35 AM
Jeff,you will see a pretty big difference between the 350 and the 450 as far as pushing ability.Generally speaking the 450/550/650 do not vary much in weight but the drivetrain is what has changed in them,more horsepower as you move up,tougher trannies and final drives etc.
You should stick with John Deere as the preferred brand as parts should not be much of a problem and there are so many of them out there that used parts become a possibility in some cases.Cat would probably be next and then there is a big gap to whatever you would call third place.International does not have anything even close to the top two.The older Case with that trick jerky transmission is a joke,just cleaning the tracks on those old Case dozers is a joke if you have to do it every night in cold weather.
Komatsu seems to have the best import but getting parts for an older one in your price range might be a problem.
The weak points of the old John Deeres are an occasional head gasket,the track adjusters blow the seals and leak down and the blade linkage where the small end of the cylinder (rod) up near the radiator tends to crack and the ones you look at have probably already been welded.
I am not mentioning Allis Chalmers which was a great dozer because there are no dealers/parts available unless you happened to have one with the old Detroit engine and needed engine parts.
My rule of thumb is D6 size and up should be Caterpillar.Anything smaller and John Deere gets the nod.Ron G

Jeff D.
09-02-2006, 08:57 PM
I looked at another dozer today, a JD450B. It was basically an assembled collection of worn out parts.:crying

So, I returned too the 350 and checked it out some more. It's been in the nicest shape of all the older dozers I've found so far in my price range. I may be making a mistake, but I've decided that it's the one. I can put it too work without any repairs needed, and with some practice, and possibly new grousers and/or the addition of rippers, I'm hoping it'll do what I want. I really don't need it for much more than smaller landscaping jobs/driveways anyway.

I measure the grousers. They were 3/4" high. Is that worn?? I also measured the blade. It's 90", the widest of the ones available for it. That may have added to my perception that it was light?

As long as he didn't sell it inbetween yesterday, and my message I left on his phone tonight, it'll be mine.

Thanks again everyone for all the advice. It's been really apperciated.:thumbsup

jmac
09-02-2006, 09:55 PM
Hey Jeff, congrats on the new machine. I have 2001 JD450H and even with that I have to work the tree out of the ground sometimes. Get the corner of the blade under the tree and lift and turn blade at the same time to wiggle tree loose. Evergreens come out better than hard woods. I realize that my machine is newer but it still takes some effort. I love the machine and glad I spent the money. I sometimes wish I had a 650 but for the most part I can do what I need to, sometimes it just take more time to do.
After I bought the dozer I was able to do a lot more jobs that a skid steer just can't do. I see more older JD350 around than any other machine in the weight class and vintage and that says something. The smaller dozer use less fuel and are easier to transport. I think the 350 will scape some dog poor off sidewalks better than a skid steer, look I found a new company for you, Jeff's dog poor removal INC. :yup
Keep use informed on how you make out.

Squizzy246B
09-02-2006, 10:02 PM
Well hope you get it...and don't forget the pic's...like Digger:rolleyes:

Cat420
09-02-2006, 10:16 PM
Unless I'm picturing the wrong part, 3/4" for the grouser sounds very worn. That would definitely be a big cause of the traction problems that you mentioned.

We had a member on here that advertised a regrouser system rather than buying a completely new shoe to save money. It may be worthwhile to look them up.

Good luck with the new toy.

Jeff D.
09-02-2006, 10:31 PM
Evergreens come out better than hard woods.
I've thought that too. On my property I usually leave the pines (Norway) and remove everything else. I'm not really up on trees that much, but we've alot of Poplar, Willow, and this brushy crap, I think is called either "Elder" or "Alder" that grows like weeds, and has roots that go everywhere. No Birch, they've all died off around here. Any of them that are left are near dead, but they can be a real treat getting the stumps out sometimes.

I've maybe two acres left I want to clean up, but will leave some of the bigger stuff there grow, and just clean between them.


3/4" for the grouser sounds very worn.I'll be checking into that, for sure.:thumbsup

Squizzy, Pic's.........I promise. Here's a couple of my fun, so far, without a dozer.

Ford LT-9000
09-03-2006, 12:03 AM
You call those trees you can push those babies over by hand :confused:

If the sprocket and chain are worn out putting heavier grouser bars on the pads just excelerates the wear on the track chain and sprocket. You can buy grouser bar stock and well them to the existing grouser bar on the pads if the pads are not bent.

If you want to keep the machine for a long time its not that bad to swap out the tracks for new ones and replace the rollers,sproket and check the idler.

The worse thing to happen is working somewhere and throw a track.

If the machine doesn't have them you may want to put some sweeps from the ROPs to the rad support to protect the hood from tree damage.

You might want to find a arch for the back for skidding your huge trees around the property :lmao

Anyhow good luck with the new machine :thumbsup

Jeff D.
09-03-2006, 12:49 AM
The sprockets, pins, bushings, have been replaced in the recent past. The grousers and link(?)(the part grouser bolts too & pins go through) are not new though. The link looks in decent shape, as far as I can tell. The grousers, I have no idea about, but they aren't bent atleast.

You call those trees you can push those babies over by hand :confused: .......You might want to find a arch for the back for skidding your huge trees around the property :lmao I don't remember saying I had huge trees to move. I'm sure I mentioned moving 4" trees. My trees are so spindly and small because I lack the solid granite it takes too grow them really big.

Touche' :rolleyes:

Anyhow good luck with the new machine :thumbsup Thank You. I'm anxious too try it out.:yup

NWH
09-03-2006, 01:00 AM
On the 350 - 450 B C D & E series JD dozers make sure the large bolts
that hold the transmission on are tight. They tend to loosen often under
hard working conditions resulting in broken transmission mounts.
This is a very common problem on these units. I have owned several
450s.

Ford LT-9000
09-03-2006, 01:12 AM
Just giving you a hard time :yup

Make sure the machine has a seat belt that works or make one fit so when your running the machine you have a seat belt. Your slopes may not look steep but if you ever do flop the machine on the side the seat belt keeps you from getting flung out and crushed.

Here is a company that sells grouser bar stock you weld onto your existing track pads. Its time consuming to cut and weld new bars onto the pads but it will be worth it if you really need more bite.

www.fordsteel.com/wearalloy_grouser_bar.htm

I found some info the grouser bars on your tracks are supposed to be approximatly 1" tall and about 5/8" thick.

Here is another site its in Acrobat format

www.wescovan.com/catalogs/GrouserBar.pdf#search=%22Grouser%20Bar%20Stock%22

Jeff D.
09-03-2006, 01:12 AM
Thanks NWH, I'll check that out.

I looked at a 450B today, and when I pulled the right steer lever back hard, it wanted too kill the motor, but dozer wouldn't turn. Stuck clutch most likely???

When I pulled the left, the handle moved all the way back, but dozer went straight. Worn out/ misadjusted left steer brake???

I think the left may have been more than just misadjustment. The owner said he needed to adjust that side quite often, too get it to turn left. That didn't sound right at all.

Jeff D.
09-03-2006, 01:19 AM
I found some info the grouser bars on your tracks are supposed to be approximatly 1" tall and about 5/8" thick.

:thumbsup So these are worn approx 1/4" down. I wonder what's acceptable?

I looked on JD's site, but they didn't give the grousers dimensions.

I don't even remember seeing a seat belt. Maybe it was tucked under the seat or something. I'll be getting one if not.

Thanks for the links.

Ford LT-9000
09-03-2006, 01:54 AM
The only way you can tell if you need more traction is running the machine. One thing about worn grousers is they do keep you from gouging up the ground when turning especially in areas where you are trying to keep smooth.

Another benefit the tracks have less chances of you digging yourself down to the belly pan
then your stuck :Banghead

The old 963 Cat loader I used to run the tracks were so loose they jumped up and down the grouser bars were darn near worn smooth. One side of the track was missing a few pads.

Grader4me
09-03-2006, 06:40 AM
Cool :thumbsup I'd read that post before , but forgot about it. Thanks.
Was that "well", or does that mean something else? Something Australians say?

I haven't seen Deas on here in a long time.:beatsme I always enjoyed his post too. I hope everythings ok.

Interesting discussion. I was wondering about Deas as well. He sent me a copy of his "book in progress" which I read and throughly enjoyed. As you say I hope everything is okay with him.

iceberg210
09-03-2006, 02:33 PM
There are two things that I would be careful with.
A. Don't get too small of a dozer. I think the 350 is in the same bucket as the D2 from what I've heard in that they are just too small to do any serious material moving.
B. If you are serious about grading I would very much suggest, urge, beg you not to use anything but a power six way. You can grade with even just a two way but it takes alot more time and ussually (unless you're really good) never even close to what a 6 way can do.

JBL
09-03-2006, 06:23 PM
Jeff, I just measured the grousers on my 350B and they are 1 1/2". I think they only have about 40 hours them.

Jeff D.
09-03-2006, 09:22 PM
Jeff, I just measured the grousers on my 350B and they are 1 1/2". I think they only have about 40 hours them.Ok, I would think 3/4" less grouser would make a difference that could be noticed. Thanks!:yup

Jeff D.
09-05-2006, 09:47 PM
Don't get too small of a dozer. I think the 350 is in the same bucket as the D2 from what I've heard in that they are just too small to do any serious material moving.:eek:

I would very much suggest, urge, beg you not to use anything but a power six way.:eek: :eek:

Oh, you're not going to be impressed with me now.I just got done paying for the 350. It has a manual 6 way, is that close enough.:beatsme:bouncegri

I know that it would've been smarter to have bought a little bigger, and with power six way, but you really don't get much dozer for what I paid. This ones in decent shape, so I'll make the best of it. It's paid for now, so if it sits and doesn't do anything I won't be making payments on something I'm not using atleast.

It shouldn't depreciate much either being as old as it is. It's reached bottom already.:yup

Thanks again Iceberg, and everyone for all the advice/help.

digger242j
09-05-2006, 09:53 PM
It has a manual 6 way, is that close enough.

Well, learning with that will make you a better dozer operator in the long run...

iceberg210
09-05-2006, 10:44 PM
I overemphasized mainly because I've met many people who have made the mistake of buying less then they need. The 350 is a great machine and I'd like to have one of them or a Cletrac/Oliver someday. The manual six way will be alot of fun and as long as you aren't doing real high production dozing you should be alright. Besides digger is right it will make you a great dozer driver with the manual 6 way. Anyway glad to here you got your dozer hope you have fun with it and by the way I think we'd all like to see a picture.

Jeff D.
09-05-2006, 11:01 PM
.......and by the way I think we'd all like to see a picture.Will do! :thumbsup Soon as I go pick er' up.

woberlin
09-05-2006, 11:36 PM
Congrats on your new dozer! For what you paid you can't really loose, barring a major breakdown. Even then, plenty of used parts available, and if you can do the work yourself, you won't get hurt to bad. I would bet you'll find that once word gets out you have it, you'll keep it working.

Squizzy246B
09-06-2006, 05:08 AM
:D
It shouldn't depreciate much either being as old as it is. It's reached bottom already

Now thats what I call leading with your chin:bash :bouncegri

"Come to Jeff's Place where all good old machinery goes to die"

:cool: :rolleyes: :D :D

digger242j
09-06-2006, 06:16 AM
]"Come to Jeff's Place where all good old machinery goes to die"[/I]

Or bad old machinery goes, to live forever... :yup

Orchard Ex
09-06-2006, 08:28 AM
I bet he starts an equipment museum and charges $$ to come over an look at it! :thumbsup

digger242j
09-06-2006, 06:13 PM
Yeah. You think we'll get a discount on the admission? :spaz

Jeff D.
09-06-2006, 07:12 PM
Yeah. You think we'll get a discount on the admission? :spazIt'll be BYOB.................................Bring Your Old Backhoe.(or acceptable alternative equipment):thumbsup

There's people worse than I am with the old equipment. I've a buddy who collects and restores old farm tractors. He's now so many that he makes his wife park in the driveway so he can use the garage space for tractor parking.
His tractors get waxed more often than my pick-up.:rolleyes:

littledenny
09-06-2006, 08:09 PM
Am I wrong in thinking that's how you move trees with a dozer?


In the for what it's worth department - I'd suspect that the guys here will tell you that's there's no single right answer to that one. In the recent past, I found it quite effective to raise the blade high, and push against the trunk to get things going. The idea is to use the weight of the tree to do most of the work. If the first push doesn't get things started, then you wait for the tree to rebound back, and push again when the tree moves away from you. I've managed to take down some 12 inch trees with an old 400 series Deere dozer this way.

Big thing to remember here is not to let the root ball catch your blade and lift you from underneath, or to let it get into your front end, radiator, etc. In other words, back off once things are headed in the right direction. By the time the tree goes horizontal, you should be well back from the root ball. Takes timing.

That said, This is not a good technique if you don't have a good overhead structure, brush guards, etc. Really, it all depends on the species of tree, as some are better rooted than others; the tree's natural lean, soil composition, soil moisture content, slope, traction, and probably 50 other factors I'm not thinking about right now.

And I'd bet that any three operators would have three solutions to any given tree.

All in all, I prefer to use a track hoe.

Jeff D.
09-07-2006, 10:54 PM
Thanks Littledenny, I'll try out what you said, as carefully as possible.:yup I'll be building a ROPS for it this winter, before I do any pushing over of trees.
..........we'd all like to see a picture. As promised.

JBL
09-07-2006, 11:31 PM
Jeff, If you build a ROPS for the machine and then decide to sell it later on be sure to remove them. You can be held liable if the ROPS fails.

Jeff D.
09-07-2006, 11:55 PM
JBL, do you have a ROPS on your 350B? If so, and you get a chance sometime, take some pictures of it. I'd like to see how it's built so I can design mine the best way.

I will remove it if I do sell it though.:yup

Thanks.:thumbsup

Electra_Glide
09-08-2006, 08:55 AM
Well, now that you got it, why don't you throw it in the back of the Mack and drag it down here. I can give you all the stump removin' practice you want. I spent two hours last night tryin' to uproot some stumps with the skidskeer, but didn't have much luck. Of course, these stumps are a little bigger, maybe 24-30"...:eek:

I think I need to get Nac to bring me some of that rock bustin' expanding goo or have Ford LT-9000 bring me some of them B.C. high explosives...:bouncegri

Either that or go rent an excavator...


Joe

Squizzy246B
09-08-2006, 09:40 AM
..........we'd all like to see a picture.......... As promised.

Geez, all you need in that shed now is a Hart Parr and your ready for business:rolleyes: ...wait a minute...whats that up the back??:D :lmao ;)

Jeff D.
09-08-2006, 11:56 AM
Geez, all you need in that shed now is a Hart Parr and your ready for business:rolleyes: ...wait a minute...whats that up the back??:D :lmao ;)That's way too new to be a Hart-Parr! Why, that was probobly made in the 50's (it's not even as old as Digger).:eek: :rolleyes:

Jeff D.
09-08-2006, 12:04 PM
I spent two hours last night tryin' to uproot some stumps with the skidskeer, but didn't have much luck. Of course, these stumps are a little bigger, maybe 24-30"...:eek:That's been my luck too. MY little skid steer won't barely wiggle most stumps.
Before I had my Backhoe, I'd a 14-18" pine that went down in the front yard during an ice storm. Even though it was already over, I still needed too use my semi to pull it out the rest of the way, and it even worked that.:eek:

Cat420
09-08-2006, 01:05 PM
Did I hear people talking about fighting trees?:bouncegri I prefer to take the tree and stump out at the same time.

Squizzy246B
09-08-2006, 05:58 PM
That's way too new to be a Hart-Parr! Why, that was probobly made in the 50's (it's not even as old as Digger).:eek: :rolleyes:

Yep, your right....I was talking antique...not pre-historic:rolleyes:


Congratulations on the dozer. You see how 420 has pushed over the tree with his hoe...thats what the pusher bars are for. You get up high and use the weight of the tree to bring the roots up then you can get into it with a blade. The old D7 and D8 we used to clear sections of our farm used them to push out massive trees like 60" in Diameter. Its all about technique. So when you finished with the Rops just knock up a pusher.

Orchard Ex
09-08-2006, 07:24 PM
Its all about technique. So when you finished with the Rops just knock up a pusher.
Now Jeff, before you get too excited remember he's speaking Austrailian...
not :naughty
:bouncegri

Ford LT-9000
09-08-2006, 09:51 PM
Oh man you need some kind of cab on that machine even if you make a heavy enough hoop over the back and canterlever a roof over top.

If you start pushing a tree over and a branch falls out of the tree and hits you its going to hurt :roll

I do agree if you do build a ROPs you could have some legal issues if somebody runs the machine and it flops on its side and the ROPs bends.

You mainly want some head protection and keep the rain off ya.

Cat 420 your a brave man pushing a tree over like that with a rubber tired hoe :eek:

I would rather pull out the chainsaw or use the backhoe and a chainsaw to help the tree go over. You leave enough stump for leverage to rip it out.

The problem when pushing a tree over and its not very strong on the top or rotten you could start pushing on it and the wobbling of the tree could make the top snap off and fall backwards onto the machine. Or you can have a widow maker come down and it will hurt you or kill you without a ROPs with a ROPs and it falls on top unexpectantly it may make you xxxxx your pants :naughty

The equipment that Jeff has in his shed should be in a museum :lmao

One of the local guys had a large stump in his yard the tree was about 60"s in diameter. Anyhow he had pigs (porky pigs) so he drilled holes in around the stump and shoved corn on the cob down the holes. The pigs eventually dug around the stump getting at the corn. They dug away the dirt so he could eventually get a chainsaw to cut the tap roots.

We don't have many large stumps left on residential lots but using dynamite was common to loosen up a big stump. Most stumps now are from trees with a 36" diameter where as some of the old trees here had a 72" diameter or more.

Another way of pulling trees over is take a 1/2 or 5/8s steel cable get it up as high as you can get it in the tree and pull the tree over. A excavator or a loaded tandem axle dump truck can yank a tree over if its small enough.

Squizzy246B
09-09-2006, 12:11 AM
Cat 420 your a brave man pushing a tree over like that with a rubber tired hoe

I don't know why he is brave??. Maybe experienced and cautious??

Here ya goes Jeff old son...like this dozer:

http://www.motorsm.com/AUS/machinery/pics_ads/case_1150c.jpg

Squizzy246B
09-09-2006, 12:20 AM
and if a tree pusher don't work you can always get some balls!::eek:

http://www.gatewaybbs.com.au/Heytbury/Simpson.htm

and here, I found a new grader for Digger:

http://www.reotb.com/custftp/26/Prop/2664/Brochure/DaleySale0015.JPG

Jeff D.
09-09-2006, 12:25 AM
Here ya goes Jeff old son...like this dozer:

http://www.motorsm.com/AUS/machinery...case_1150c.jpg

That'de do the trick alright!:thumbsup

I probobly won't be building a tree pusher. I won't be using it that much for pushing over trees. If I were though, it'de be like that.


So when you finished with the Rops just knock up a pusher.

Now Jeff, before you get too excited remember he's speaking Austrailian...:naughty :beatsme Had he said "just push up a knocker" I'da knew what he meant.

Been there, done that!!:bouncegri

Cat420
09-09-2006, 06:49 PM
I guess I could have provided a little more information about the tree pictures.

First I fill the front bucket with dirt and then flip the stabilizer pads over the the dirt side. It puts the machine at around 24-25,000lbs and with the dirt pads down it doesn't move at all. Also I dig up the roots facing the machine. With slow steady pressure, the tree practically takes itself down in the direction you want it to go. An excavator is best, because you can put the bucket against the tree and drive to take it down, but you use what you have on hand.

Jeff D.
09-09-2006, 08:52 PM
I guess I could have provided a little more information about the tree pictures.It appears your system must work good. Doesn't hurt to see how other people do things either. That's how we learn.......:thumbsup Anythings better than the way I've done it before my backhoe. And even with the backhoe, I always cut the tree down first , and pulled the stump. I can see how having the tree still standing helps get the stump loose. Saves alot of work.

I got too play a bit this evening with my dozer. It doesn't have any traction problems here. When I tried it originally, before buying it, I was operating it on surface of mostly very dry rocky pit run, and that's probobly why it didn't get the best traction. I my field it would run out of power before spinning a track. My soil has alot of clay with very little rock, so the grousers really have good traction.

What a blast too play with.:yup

A question for JD guys. I was looking at the grease fittings and they aren't like any I've seen before. They look like a button instead of a nipple, and I don't understand how a grease gun attaches to it. Is there a special fitting I need to put on my grease gun, or should I just pull them all and buy regular zerks?

Squizzy246B
09-09-2006, 09:25 PM
A question for JD guys. I was looking at the grease fittings and they aren't like any I've seen before. They look like a button instead of a nipple, and I don't understand how a grease gun attaches to it. Is there a special fitting I need to put on my grease gun, or should I just pull them all and buy regular zerks?

Jeff, if they are the large octagonal slide on type with a small pin in the middle they are just an older type. You can normally buy a new connector which just screws onto your regular grease gun. They can actually be a lot easier to use as they disconnect from the gun easy. Replacing them is generally preferrable (for commonality) but screw one out and check the thread type first.

Jeff D.
09-09-2006, 10:36 PM
They aren't octagonal, but must slide on from the side like you said. They are fairly large. I'll check with the Snap-on or Mac tool guy, see if they have a fitting for it.

Looks like this:

Ford LT-9000
09-09-2006, 11:42 PM
Those type fittings are usually found on old crane turn tables dads old crane has those type fittings. The there is a special fitting for the hose on a grease gun. Is there a little ball bearing in the fitting ?

One way you can grease that is with a Pin greaser its a like a needle that a doctor uses but on a larger scale its meant to pushed into the hole where the ball bearing is. A pin greaser is for greasing zerks were you can't get the coupler into.

Or you can get one of these

Lincoln Part numbers

80933 For 7/8s diameter Button head fittings
81458 For 5/8s diameter Button head fittings

Needle Nozzel Part numbers

5803

Jeff D.
09-10-2006, 12:03 AM
Is there a little ball bearing in the fitting ?I didn't notice a ball bearing, but there very well may have been one. I didn't have good lighting when I looked at it.

Thanks for the #'s. I'll measure the head and check them out.:thumbsup

Dwan Hall
09-10-2006, 02:56 AM
I got mine at NAPA. I have 1 grease gun which I use thoes fittings.

RonG
09-10-2006, 07:36 AM
They are the old style button fittings and they are still sold by Alemite etc.
Some of the old equipment used gear oil in the bottom rollers instead of grease and that is the fitting they used.The grease reservoir and pump are made to hold a few gallons,they sat on the ground with a long handle to pump with and a tab on the bottom to put your foot on to hold it in place while you pumped so you would have a free hand to hold the head on the fitting.
Most everyone just started using grease in everything and a convenient way to do it was to buy the proper head to fit the button fitting and plumb a zerk fitting to the input side of it so you only need to carry one grease gun and the adapter you made could stay with the machine that needs it so you won't lose it.Ron G

smalltime
09-10-2006, 10:26 AM
It seems like you can not go wring with a Case 450 with a 6 way blade

JBL
09-10-2006, 12:56 PM
Jeff, my 350B is about a million pieces. :) so can't get a good picture for you. I scanned the rops section of the parts book for you so you can get an idea of how it looks.

http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e323/JBL71/Picture002.jpg

#12 and #11 bolt to the top of the hardnose just in front of the hood. Where you see the bracket with bolt #7, those brackets mount to the side of the machine behind the footstep.Where you see bolt#5 those brackets mount to the back of the machine above the drawbar. Hope this helps you out.

littledenny
09-11-2006, 03:33 AM
The problem when pushing a tree over and its not very strong on the top or rotten you could start pushing on it and the wobbling of the tree could make the top snap off and fall backwards onto the machine. Or you can have a widow maker come down and it will hurt you or kill you without a ROPs with a ROPs and it falls on top unexpectantly it may make you shiat your pants :naughty



This is good advice, regardless of what equipment you use - backhoe, track hoe, dozer, loader, cable, etc. (I've also used a backhoe on some good sized trees.)

My normal method these days is to notch a tree, get a trackhoe bucket as high as possible on the back side of the tree, and apply a bit of pressure, then backcut the tree as the hoe pushes the tree over. We tend to cut the stump high, so that we have some leverage against the stump. This is a two man operation, and it takes some coordination. And it really puts the cut man in a dangerous position - caught between a falling tree (and usually on some sort of a slope), a stationary stump, within the swing radius of a moving hoe boom, and under the possibility of falling limbs and branches. (Come to think of it, I'm usually the cut man here.)

Guess the advantage of pushing the tree without cutting it first is that it's a one man operation, and you might get by without having to spend time digging out the stump later, assuming the weight of the tree pulls the stump out in the process. The disadvantage is that you might have to rock the tree a few times, and that could lead to the infamous widowmaker situation, and falling limbs when you least expect them.

Seems the best answer is to have equipment big enough to only have to push once.

Just for grins' sake - another couple things to consider:

Be careful about getting a backhoe/track hoe bucket hooked behind a tree falling away from the machine. One guy locally did so, trying to muscle a good sized pine with a mini-excavator, and ended up following the tree down an embankment. He lived through it, but it wasn't pretty.

Likewise, if you ever try to pull a tree with a hoe, make sure you have the boom between you and the tree. This way, you have the possibility of steering the tree away from you if things go wrong. If you have your cab and the tree on the same side, you may pull it in on top of you. (I do not recommend pulling ANY tree towards you. This is simply asking for trouble.)
Same goes for getting a dozer blade behind a tree, and pulling - this is bad juju. (I learned this one the hard way. )

tylermckee
09-11-2006, 09:21 AM
I would never "rock" a tree with an excavator, i'll either dig all the way around the tree so there is pretty much nothing holding it up (don't do it on a very windy day), or i will pull out the old chainsaw. If the tree looks/feels like its rotten and might snap off where im pushing ill usually cut it down, or sometimes preceed with the machine, just very gently. I prefer to clear with a guy on the saw and a guy in the machine, it's usually a little cleaner.

digger242j
09-11-2006, 09:19 PM
I prefer the digging and then pushing method myself.


Also I dig up the roots facing the machine.

That's right--if you dig the roots out on the side facing the machine, but leave them alone on the side you want it to fall towards, you give yourself a little extra margin of safety. The roots on the near side will no longer hold the tree from falling away from you, but the ones on the far side will help to keep it from falling back towards you. At the same time, they don't do much to keep it from falling away from you, because they just bend up and snap.

All the cautions about rotten trees and rocking trees stated above are good advice. Even if you're going to push it over, you need to study it and determine how far it's going to reach when it hits the ground and which way it wants to fall. If you're pushing it to where it wants to go anyway, life is good, but if it wants to fall hard to the south, you're taking a chance in trying to push it over to the north.

Just a couple weeks ago, I pushed over a dead and partly rotten tree, and got a real thrill. The trunk forked about fifteen feet above the ground, and when I pushed it, one of the forks caught in the branches of a nearby tree. It snapped off--the rest of the tree went away in the opposite direction, as I had intended, but the part that contacted the other tree fell back toward me. It landed about six feet to my left, but it was long enough that if it had fallen directly at me, it would've hit the cab of the excavator.

tylermckee
09-12-2006, 03:13 AM
I prefer the digging and then pushing method myself.



That's right--if you dig the roots out on the side facing the machine, but leave them alone on the side you want it to fall towards, you give yourself a little extra margin of safety. The roots on the near side will no longer hold the tree from falling away from you, but the ones on the far side will help to keep it from falling back towards you. At the same time, they don't do much to keep it from falling away from you, because they just bend up and snap.

All the cautions about rotten trees and rocking trees stated above are good advice. Even if you're going to push it over, you need to study it and determine how far it's going to reach when it hits the ground and which way it wants to fall. If you're pushing it to where it wants to go anyway, life is good, but if it wants to fall hard to the south, you're taking a chance in trying to push it over to the north.

Just a couple weeks ago, I pushed over a dead and partly rotten tree, and got a real thrill. The trunk forked about fifteen feet above the ground, and when I pushed it, one of the forks caught in the branches of a nearby tree. It snapped off--the rest of the tree went away in the opposite direction, as I had intended, but the part that contacted the other tree fell back toward me. It landed about six feet to my left, but it was long enough that if it had fallen directly at me, it would've hit the cab of the excavator.

Now that have successfully got this thread off topic, lets share tree pushing experiences. The other week i was clearing some land behind a foundation i was backfilling. Just a bunch of decent sized alder, and some big cedar
trees. There were two big cedar trees growing right next to eachother that had kind of grown together. I wanted to just push them both over at once and have them fall parallel to eachother but once i started pushing on one the stump from it would lift the stump of the other one and push it towards the foundation. I had to get right beside the trees and push them apart from eachother so that one tree fell away from the machine and the other right beside it, it was a little spooky having a 30+" diam tree falling so damn close.

digger242j
09-12-2006, 05:52 AM
Now that have successfully got this thread off topic, lets share tree pushing experiences.

It's a thankless job, but somebody's got to do it... :wink2

Squizzy246B
09-12-2006, 07:35 AM
It's a thankless job, but somebody's got to do it... :wink2

Hey, Get your own job!:rolleyes:

digger242j
09-12-2006, 08:46 AM
Hey, Get your own job!:rolleyes:

Hey, we're on page seven of this thread! We should be trading pineapple upside-down cake recipies by this point. If you can't keep up, we're gonna have to look elsewhere for someone to take up the slack. :rolleyes:

:)

Squizzy246B
09-12-2006, 09:14 AM
I have a great recipe for Piragi

and an even better one for stir fried kangaroo.....we call it Hop Suey!:laugh

I crack me up sometimes

tylermckee
09-12-2006, 09:16 AM
Here you go guys, tell me how it turns out, maybe get a pic or two.

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake
2 tablespoons butter
1 can (20 ounces) pineapple slices, drained
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup shortening
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 egg, beaten
1 1/2 cups cake flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/3 cup milk



Melt butter in an 8-inch square cake pan. Add brown sugar; blend with the butter. Arrange 5 or 6 pineapple slices over the bottom of the pan, cutting as needed to fit as many as possible. In a mixing bowl, cream shortening, vanilla, and granulated sugar. Add egg; beat thoroughly. Add sifted dry ingredients alternately with the milk. Pour batter over pineapple. Bake at 350° for 35 minutes, or until a wooden pick or cake tester inserted in center comes out clean.

Squizzy246B
09-12-2006, 09:29 AM
Here you go guys, tell me how it turns out, maybe get a pic or two.

Pineapple Upside-Down Cake
2 tablespoons butter
1 can (20 ounces) pineapple slices, drained
1/2 cup brown sugar
1/4 cup shortening
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup granulated sugar
1 egg, beaten
1 1/2 cups cake flour
1/4 teaspoon salt
2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/3 cup milk

.

See..ask and ye shall receive:thumbsup

digger242j
09-12-2006, 09:36 AM
Nice try Tyler, but you need to keep an eye on Squizzy--he's the master. Notice how he didn't even respond to the idea of pineapple upside-down cake, but went directly to kangaroos.

Awesome, just awesome...

:notworthy


On edit:
ARRGH! Squizzy, you got drawn back in to a reply to the cake discussion!

My idol has feet of clay...

:Banghead

Squizzy246B
09-12-2006, 09:50 AM
Nice try Tyler, but you need to keep an eye on Squizzy--he's the master. Notice how he didn't even respond to the idea of pineapple upside-down cake, but went directly to kangaroos.

Awesome, just awesome...

:notworthy


On edit:
ARRGH! Squizzy, you got drawn back in to a reply to the cake discussion!

My idol has feet of clay...

:Banghead

Wellllllll The recipe for Hop Suey starts off...1st catch kangaroo:bouncegri

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 11:09 AM
I had all intentions of this being a serious thread
:Banghead "Yeah.........what this guy ^ said!!"

I can't even say that without starting too laugh:bouncegri




I'm not suprised Squizzy's eating kangaroo, I mean he's eating peanut butter and groundhog sandwich's too, for Gods sack.

I don't care how thinly you slice groundhog, it's still gonna taste like "groundhog"!!:spaz :rolleyes:

Kangaroo's got too be somewhat of a step up, atleast.

Squizzy246B
09-12-2006, 06:16 PM
I don't care how thinly you slice groundhog, it's still gonna taste like "groundhog"!!:spaz :rolleyes:

Kangaroo's got too be somewhat of a step up, atleast.

Reminds me of an old recipe for Cockatoo:rolleyes: or was that Crow???:confused:

I think I'll pass on the groundhog:eek:

All this discussion on how to push trees over is very interesting but I got to tell you, as a kid, we cleared a lot of country with nothing more than a 185 Massey with a blade and an older 35 Massey and big snig chain. ROPs ..what was that?

I like this thread. Anybody have a good pancake recipe?:bouncegri

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 07:15 PM
All this discussion on how to push trees over is very interesting but I got to tell you, as a kid, we cleared a lot of country with nothing more than a 185 Massey with a blade and an older 35 Massey and big snig chain. ROPs ..what was that?:yup Testify my brutha!! I've a strong desire to hook a chain to the stumps I have and pull them out with the dozer, rather than push them out.

I don't know why that is either, maybe because that's the way I'm used to doing it.:beatsme

Anybody have a good pancake recipe?1st catch pan.............:bouncegri

littledenny
09-12-2006, 07:31 PM
Would you settle for a really good BBQ recipe that's been in my family for one generation?

digger242j
09-12-2006, 07:44 PM
Would you settle for a really good BBQ recipe that's been in my family for one generation?


As long as it's as good on Kangaroo as it is on groundhog, why not? :)


Anybody have a good pancake recipe?

I do.

-One tall tree.
-One dozer, without ROPS.
-One sturdy chain.

Attach chain to tree. Pull. :dizzy

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 07:46 PM
Would you settle for a really good BBQ recipe that's been in my family for one generation?
Can you use it too BBQ hotdogs?

Like I told someone recently, I've spent all my money on old dozers/etc., and don't have no mo' money left now.:crying

All I can afford for food is wieners, and wiener water soup.:eek:

But BBQ wieners doesn't sound so bad!!

digger242j
09-12-2006, 07:47 PM
Testify my brutha!! I've a strong desire to hook a chain to the stumps I have and pull them out with the dozer, rather than push them out.

On a much more serious note--keep in mind the real hazards associated with pulling anything with a chain. Pull hard enough to snap the chain, and the backlash could literally remove your head... :nono

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 07:56 PM
-One tall tree.
-One dozer, without ROPS.
-One sturdy chain.

Attach chain to tree. Pull. :dizzyAhhh......just so ya know, when I do that I put the dozer in gear, jump off, and hide a safe distance away until all the crashing sounds are done.................So there!!:bouncegri

On a much more serious note--keep in mind the real hazards associated with pulling anything with a chain. Pull hard enough to snap the chain, and the backlash could literally remove your head...
I've a short story about something like that. The company I truck for has a drop yard in McCook Il. The yard had terrible potholes, and during the winter the potholes got really deep. A truck got stuck in one of the potholes, and another truck tried pulling him out with a chain. In the process the chain let go, and sprang back, over the hood, and right through the windshield of the truck. Luckily the driver didn't get hurt, but it sure made a mess of his truck.:nono

tylermckee
09-12-2006, 08:02 PM
Can you use it too BBQ hotdogs?

Like I told someone recently, I've spent all my money on old dozers/etc., and don't have no mo' money left now.:crying

All I can afford for food is wieners, and wiener water soup.:eek:

But BBQ wieners doesn't sound so bad!!

Better watch who you tell that too, you tell the wrong guy all you eat is weiners and you might find yourself in an uncomfortable situation :wink2

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 08:36 PM
Eeeeuuwww!!!:spaz:eek2 Yuck!!

Now I won't even be able to enjoy my measely dinner.

Thanks Tyler!!:bouncegri

tylermckee
09-12-2006, 08:57 PM
You can always try a few of the other "guy who spent all his money on antique construction equipment" dinners. Things like top ramen, mac & cheese, squirrel, potatoes, rice, dead animals you see while driving around the ol' dump truck. Best to find roadkill that has a few different tread patterns on it, its the most tender. :thumbsup

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 09:21 PM
You can always try a few of the other "guy who spent all his money on antique construction equipment" dinners. Things like top ramen, mac & cheese, squirrel, potatoes, rice, dead animals you see while driving around the ol' dump truck. Best to find roadkill that has a few different tread patterns on it, its the most tender. :thumbsupFunny thing, about two weeks ago I was leaving in the morning and glanced in my back yard as I was crawling in my truck. Here was a bunch of rabbits (black and white ones)nibbling at the grass. I returned home later and didn't see em' around. Walking into the polebarn, there they were. They were tame rabbits.

They stayed in there for quite a few days, until I finally rounded them all up and took them too the area animal shelter. I've no idea how they got here either, but they weren't any of the neighbors.:beatsme

I could've been enjoying rabbit stew right now.:crying

Electra_Glide
09-12-2006, 09:57 PM
All this discussion on how to push trees over is very interesting but I got to tell you, as a kid, we cleared a lot of country with nothing more than a 185 Massey with a blade and an older 35 Massey and big snig chain. ROPs ..what was that?
Ah ha!!!!! we may be on to something here...

Squizzy, were you ever smacked in the head by a large tree in your youth, maybe more than once? That would explain a lot of things...:dizzy

:roll :roll :roll


Well, now that you got it, why don't you throw it in the back of the Mack and drag it down here. I can give you all the stump removin' practice you want. I spent two hours last night tryin' to uproot some stumps with the skidskeer, but didn't have much luck. Of course, these stumps are a little bigger, maybe 24-30"...:eek:

I think I need to get Nac to bring me some of that rock bustin' expanding goo or have Ford LT-9000 bring me some of them B.C. high explosives...:bouncegri
Well, Jeff didn't bring the dozer and neither Nac or Ford sent me any explosives, so I had to go get an excavator.

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 10:16 PM
Now you get the fun of trying to load them stumps in the back of your truck.

Dey's get kinda heavy sometimes.

LT said he was going to bring some explosives, just as soon as he finishes deciding on the truck he'll be buying :sleeping ..........................so it might be alittle bit.:bouncegri

(payback for all the "old equipment" jokes):wink2

Jeff D.
09-12-2006, 10:35 PM
Besides Joe, this thread isn't about trees anymore.:nono It's now about recipes, food, and what can be done to fix my current problem, ("Emptimus Fridgeratimus" for the Australians).

itsgottobegreen
09-12-2006, 11:55 PM
Damn something must have died in that fridge. You got three open boxes of baking soda in there. :eek:

Jeff D.
09-13-2006, 12:10 AM
Damn something must have died in that fridge. You got three open boxes of baking soda in there. :eek:Well, I wanta keep that pizza fresh. It'll take much longer for it too curl into a complete circle with three boxes soda.:cool:

tylermckee
09-13-2006, 02:55 AM
I thought my fridge was pretty empty and ive got 2 gallons of water, 2 -1/2 gallons of milk, 2- 1/2 gallons of orange juice, 2 bags of baby carrots, leftover chili, leftover spanish rice and beans, cheese, hot dogs, flour tortillas, turkey lunch meat, can of whipped cream, 2 tubs of yogurt, butter, jam, eggs, some jimmy dean, and the usuall condiments like ketchup, bbq sauce, ranch, etc.
My camera battery is dead so i wrote down a mental picture.

tylermckee
09-13-2006, 03:01 AM
How about a shot of the freezer?

This forum requires that you wait 300 seconds between posts. Please try again in 257 seconds.

wasnt it 60 seconds before?

digger242j
09-13-2006, 06:06 AM
This forum requires that you wait 300 seconds between posts. Please try again in 257 seconds.

wasnt it 60 seconds before?

I know Steve recently upped the time required between PMs, because spammers have begun to register at sites and use the PM systems to spam members. By increasing the time you must wait between PMs, it discourages that. I didn't know he'd adjusted the post time as well, or maybe the two are tied together somehow.

Now there's an idea! Everybody send Jeff some Spam. Mmmmm...yummy. :bouncegri

Electra_Glide
09-13-2006, 07:58 AM
Now you get the fun of trying to load them stumps in the back of your truck.
Nope, just rolled them into the woods...

This job is filling in the remains of a old abandoned in-ground pool. The original plan was to just push the stumps into what's left of the pool, and bury them, but when I pushed them in there, the hole wasn't deep enough...:eek: Most of the concrete was still in the bottom of the pool, so diging it deeper wasn't going to work either without a jackhammer.


Joe

Is it really thread hi-jacking if you're trying to bring it back to somewhere close to the original topic...:beatsme

Electra_Glide
09-13-2006, 08:06 AM
Besides Joe, this thread isn't about trees anymore.:nono It's now about recipes, food, and what can be done to fix my current problem, ("Emptimus Fridgeratimus" for the Australians).
We have the opposite problem. My wife loves to cook, but doesn't like left-overs, so the fridge is always packed with tons of leftovers, and there's usually one or two, way in the back, that have some pretty funnky stuff growing on them. Comes in lots of pretty colors too.

Maybe I should have her sign-up for the forum, and she could post her recipies...:thumbsup

Joe

digger242j
09-13-2006, 08:37 AM
The original plan was to just push the stumps into what's left of the pool, and bury them,

Bad plan. They'll eventually rot--actually, they'll rot over a long period of time, and you, or the homeowner, will have settlement that'll need attention. The woods is a better place for them.


Maybe I should have her sign-up for the forum, and she could post her recipies...

Or share her opinions on small used dozers... :yup

Squizzy246B
09-13-2006, 10:13 AM
Ah ha!!!!! we may be on to something here...

Squizzy, were you ever smacked in the head by a large tree in your youth, maybe more than once? That would explain a lot of things...:dizzy



Ummm Yes....How did you guess???:eek:

I see people here starting to develop their thread hi-jacking skills. Thread hi-jacking is an art form. Some of us (I can't believe I'm missing NCIS to type this) are born with it and actually do it totally unintentionally. Others have to work on it.

Its best to use a thin veil of continuitity from the original topic to slowly turn the thread...like this "Thinking of Jeff pulling a tree on himself with the dozer reminds me of the episode of the roadrunner where the Coyote...

or there is the virtual Bulldozer approach where right in the middle of the post you spout hey, did anyone see that movie Attack of the killer tomatoes??

There's a lot more to this...

Jeff D.
09-13-2006, 10:31 AM
My idea of "Zen" would be to have a thread slowly and unintetionally morphe from it's original subject, through most other subjects, and then accidentally arrive back at it's original subject.
(like the folk song "There's a hole in the bucket" er, something like that)

At this point it would achieve "balance", "unity", and "oneness". It would contain the continuous cycle that defines most everything.

But it has too be done unintentionally, otherwise if forced or manipulated to do the same it would........................I don't know what it would do, but I'm sure it'de be bad.:nono

And I've got to leave for work now, dang-it! Just when Squizzy was actually starting too make sense.:rolleyes:

digger242j
09-13-2006, 10:55 AM
My idea of "Zen" would be to have a thread slowly and unintetionally morphe from it's original subject, through most other subjects, and then accidentally arrive back at it's original subject.

Ahhh...but you need to realize that each of those potentially circular threads is but one of an infinite number of circular paths that might be inscribed upon the face of a globe--the globe that is "Heavy Equipment Forums". To have all of those circular paths lead back to one, single, point on the globe, and arrive, all at the same time....

Jeff D.
09-13-2006, 09:45 PM
Perhaps we went alittle too "Carl Sagan" on them Digger?:beatsme

digger242j
09-13-2006, 10:13 PM
Perhaps we went alittle too "Carl Sagan" on them Digger?:beatsme


Yeah. Maybe. I stopped there because it was making my own head hurt. :dizzy

Anybody try Tyler's recipie for pineapple upside-down cake yet?

tylermckee
09-14-2006, 12:44 AM
Ill try it tomorrow ive been busy, i cooked a 23lb turkey tonight

Electra_Glide
09-14-2006, 08:00 AM
Ill try it tomorrow ive been busy, i cooked a 23lb turkey tonight

Did you have to catch it first?

Joe

Squizzy246B
09-14-2006, 08:42 AM
At this point it would achieve "balance", "unity", and "oneness". It would contain the continuous cycle that defines most everything.

Wow...thats very profound...Having read that I feel much less like a t**d sitting in the momentos S bend of life waiting for the great flush of eternity



And I've got to leave for work now, dang-it! Just when Squizzy was actually starting too make sense.:rolleyes:

If I'm making sense...then your in DEEP DEEP Doo Doo:cool:

BTW...my wife is cranky...something about another American conspiracy....Rockstar Supernova???...whats that about?..

(How's that for a subtle Hi-jack)

tylermckee
09-14-2006, 08:57 AM
Did you have to catch it first?

Joe

No, i just laid a trail of pinneapple upside down cake leading into my stove and it jumped right in.

digger242j
09-14-2006, 09:10 AM
LOL, Tyler. :)



BTW...my wife is cranky...something about another American conspiracy....Rockstar Supernova???...whats that about?..

(How's that for a subtle Hi-jack)

It works better if the rest of us have some frame of reference to put it in. In other words, what the hell are you talkng about? :confused:

tylermckee
09-14-2006, 09:21 AM
So is anyone here doing any interesting jobs? after we button up the water main we are working on now we are headed to the beach. have to redo all the storm system from our development all the way to the beach where it outlets. 24" pipe dumping into a 60,000lb baysaver (fany $8,000 filter). Then it heads out, through the 2' thick sea wall we have to break through. we are trying to start tomorrow, the baysaver is getting delivered on tuesday.

Squizzy246B
09-14-2006, 09:43 AM
It works better if the rest of us have some frame of reference to put it in. In other words, what the hell are you talkng about? :confused:

Digger, its this new thing they invented...its called Television. I think "Rockstar Supernova" is on Foxtel (thats another thing for television called "cable").:cool:

Jeff D.
09-14-2006, 10:24 PM
BTW...my wife is cranky...something about another American conspiracy....Rockstar Supernova???...whats that about?..

(How's that for a subtle Hi-jack)I've never watched that show, but I guess it's something like "American Idol", except they're trying to become a rockstar.

So why was your wife cranky? Was it:
A: She watches the show, and was upset by something on it.(and secretly she dreams of replacing Squizzy with a tattooed, long haired, head banger type.)
or
B: She's sick of her TV being filled with "crap", and feels we (America) are beaming trashy TV programs too her on purpose, in order to make her crazy.

I already know the answer is "B". We have only "good" programs here, and we beam all the crap to other countries. We do this because it's fun, and we're just plain bored. Might as well rile up the "have not's":cool:

I could tell you all about our "good" TV programs here Squizzy, but we've all been sworn to secrecy.

(I can hear him now, "I knew it!!"):bouncegri

Jeff D.
09-14-2006, 10:39 PM
But seriously Squizzy, there's a whole lotta nuthin' on TV anymore, here too.

If it weren't for "Discovery","The History Channel","The Learning Channel", "News", etc. I wouldn't even have a TV.

It started about the time they quit playing "The Benny Hill show". (The last of the "good ones"):wink2

Cat420
09-15-2006, 01:48 PM
Ill try it tomorrow ive been busy, i cooked a 23lb turkey tonight

Want some more? This is right out our back door. Actually I should offer them to Jeff D first to supplement his "wiener water soup":bouncegri

Wolf
09-15-2006, 06:03 PM
Yummy. And I see you have the grill ready for those gobblers already.

You'll be a popular dude around Thanksgiving time.

Bob Horrell
09-15-2006, 10:41 PM
Looking at those pictures made my trigger finger twitch. I envy you.