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JD Green
12-02-2009, 08:52 PM
Noticed left track was loose, and has 2 "kinks" in it as if pins are frozen or rusted up. Will these kinks work themselves free again with time, or is there something wrong? I adjusted track tension, but that side still makes more noise than the other. Has me concerned, any feedback would be great. Thanks

QuickTrax
12-02-2009, 09:09 PM
Your track is loose because your track adjuster seals are probably leaking. The kinks in your track are probably because it is frozen. You can try to work the machine until it is free but it probably will not work itself free. We press a lot of frozen tracks apart and brush all of the rust off of the pins and from the inside of the bushings and coat them with grease then press them back together. I also see a lot of bushings cracked because the pin is trying to turn inside the bushing. I would take the chains to a track shop and have them press the chains apart and clean the pins and bushings up before you start cracking your bushings.
Good luck, QuickTrax

John C.
12-02-2009, 09:14 PM
The kinks are called bridging and this issue started when the Japanese put grease in the pin and bushing joints. It happens when the machine is not moving for a long time usually in some kind of adverse climate conditions. Salt water marine environment of extreme cold come to mind. Basically the grease turns hard and acts like concrete in the joint.

Whether the kinks will come out or not depends on how long they have been frozen. I've seen gray market excavators where they never came out. Does it hurt anything? Usually not but you have to adjust your tracks when the links place it at its tightest. Otherwise the recoil springs will get worked real hard and you get lots of noise evertime the track comes up tight.

Good Luck!

QuickTrax
12-02-2009, 09:47 PM
The kinks are called bridging and this issue started when the Japanese put grease in the pin and bushing joints. It happens when the machine is not moving for a long time usually in some kind of adverse climate conditions. Salt water marine environment of extreme cold come to mind. Basically the grease turns hard and acts like concrete in the joint.

Whether the kinks will come out or not depends on how long they have been frozen. I've seen gray market excavators where they never came out. Does it hurt anything? Usually not but you have to adjust your tracks when the links place it at its tightest. Otherwise the recoil springs will get worked real hard and you get lots of noise evertime the track comes up tight.

Good Luck!

John, The majority of the frozen chains that we come across are not greased chains. They are dry chains w/ seal washers that have been on a machine that has not been used for a while. Does it hurt anything? Yes, you can possibly break bushings, it puts added stress on your track adjuster spring and track adjuster seals. It also puts added stress on your finals. You are right, frozen joints can come loose and it does depend on how long they have been frozen.
QuickTrax

John C.
12-03-2009, 01:19 AM
I don't think I know of anyone now that doesn't run greased tracks on excavators. I haven't seen a dry set on an excavator in about seven years.

As far as busting bushings, adjusters and springs, that's why I spoke of adjusting the tracks when they are at their tightest point. They will be loose when the bridged link goes over the sprocket or the idler.

In my experience I've only seen a couple of bridging tracks that have come loose in several hundred machines I have had the pleasure of being associated with.

QuickTrax
12-03-2009, 08:25 AM
I don't think I know of anyone now that doesn't run greased tracks on excavators. I haven't seen a dry set on an excavator in about seven years.

As far as busting bushings, adjusters and springs, that's why I spoke of adjusting the tracks when they are at their tightest point. They will be loose when the bridged link goes over the sprocket or the idler.

In my experience I've only seen a couple of bridging tracks that have come loose in several hundred machines I have had the pleasure of being associated with.

JohnC, The dry chains are becoming more and more rare. The sealed and greased chains are more popular. The dry chains cost less than the sealed and greased chains and w/ the down economy we have been giving our customers all of their options and a lot of people are buying the dry chains to save a few bucks. We inform them that they will not get the hours w/ the dry chain that they would get w/ a greased chain but it seems like everyones concerned with getting their machines going for the cheapest price. I completely understand where they are coming from. We can always install sealed and greased pins and bushings into their links whenever that time comes. Even with adjusting the tracks, bushings could possibly break because while the frozen joints go over the idler or the sprocket the pin is trying to turn inside the bushing. Due to the joint being frozen, something has to give and its either going to be the pin and bushing freeing up or the bushing cracking. A machine can run w/ frozen joints for a while but eventually problems will occur.
QuickTrax
QuickTrax